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Carol Horton
135 followers
135 followers
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Carol's posts

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Please check out my review of Dr. Loren Fishman's new book, "Healing Yoga."

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"There’s something happening in the culture that’s sick, that’s literally sucking the life force out of youth who supposedly have everything to live for. And that’s where the yoga comes in."

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"Countless books promise to provide some extraordinary new set of tools to help us live healthier, happier, and more empowered lives. Disappointingly few, however, deliver more than a slightly new twist on some stock self-help method spiced up with a recycled insight or two. Jill Miller’s newly released The Roll Model: A Step-by-Step Guide to Erase Pain, Improve Mobility, and Live Better in Your Body (Victory Belt, 2014), however, proves a dazzling exception to the rule. This 432-page, carefully written and beautifully illustrated book lays out a comprehensive new system of “self-care healthcare” that’s grounded in science, honed by experience, and proven by an exceptional track record of success."

Check out my review of Jill Miller's fantastic new book, "The Roll Model," via Yoga U Online!

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"Although Pandit Rajmani Tigunait’s The Secret of the Yoga Sutra and David Gordon White’s The Yoga Sutra of Patanjali: A Biography could not be more different in terms of core message and approach, both share the same underlying problem. Essentially, this is that each in its own way replicates the dominant paradigm that divides our studies of the Yoga Sutra (YS) between 1) practitioner-oriented studies that are reverentially devoted to explicating it as a timeless truth, and 2) narrowly empiricist academic studies that are utterly dismissive of the concerns and experiences of practitioners. This split between lived practice and scholarly inquiry is unfortunate in that it narrows the scope of ideas and information in ways that impoverish both."

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"Ever since translations of Indian sacred texts first became available in the U.S., some of our most important cultural and political leaders, such as Henry David Thoreau and Martin Luther King, Jr., have felt these ancient ideas and the practices associated with them offer something important, and potentially transformative to our modernized, globalized, and technologically-driven world. I share this feeling, and am confident many others do as well. The trick is to coalesce our work into a more coherent movement that challenges contemporary social and political dysfunction, rather than simply accommodating to it. In the process, we can co-create a new vision of an alternative culture in which holistic health and spiritual meaning are actively embraced as social, and not simply individual values. Given the unprecedentedly high levels of public interest in yoga, meditation, and mindfulness today, the time to launch such a collaborative project is now."

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This post is generating some really interesting and valuable discussion. Thanks to all who've participated here & elsewhere!

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"one major panel discussion, several workshops, several roundtable discussions, and major parts of the closing session were dedicated to exploring classic social justice themes of inequality, difference, discrimination, and privilege. Topics addressed included how yoga philosophy and practices can help us work with these issues, conversational techniques drawn from the Quaker tradition and Nonviolent Communication method, how to address transgender students in mixed gender classes, how to work sensitively and effectively with students with larger bodies, and more."

My review of this spring's Yoga Service Council Conference at the Omega Institute in New York. It was great - and incredibly valuable - time; check it out!

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"What do you think is the biggest problem/issue with North American yoga today and what do you think we can do as a community to help solve it?

C: I feel that the biggest problem is the tendency to practice yoga in ways that encourage disconnection, distraction, and escape, rather than connection, awareness, and engagement."

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"If you had told me a few weeks ago that I’d soon be spending a weekend in NYC as a panelist at a Yoga Journal conference event along with Seane Corn and the CEO of Lululemon (among others), I’d have laughed and said you were crazy. And if you had nonetheless insisted on going on and telling me that not only would I be part of this event, but that doing it would radically reorient my feelings toward Lululemon – a company that I’ve long had a visceral aversion to – I’d have felt worried."

Reflections on last weekend's "Practice of Leadership" event . . . thoughts/comments welcome!
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