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Hamlin Dental Group
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In our practice, we often find that patients who are missing teeth underestimate the impact of this loss. Often the focus is on the aesthetic aspects of tooth loss, an important factor, but not the only effect of losing teeth.

WAYS TOOTH LOSS IMPACTS YOU

• Appearance and self-confidence- The psychological effect of losing a tooth often varies depending on the location of the empty socket. A missing back molar usually goes unseen and causes little to no emotional angst. However, if a front tooth falls out, the patient is generally in great distress. Losing a front tooth is often all of the incentives a patient needs to call us for an appointment.

• Eating and speaking abilities- The degree of disruption brought about by a lost tooth depends on which tooth is missing. Many patients report that difficulties biting, and a lisp accompany missing front teeth. The loss of a back tooth often will bring about problems chewing food. Many patients are compromising their nutrition because of missing teeth.

• Bone loss- A lost tooth has significant consequences for your jaw, the most serious of these is bone loss. When a tooth falls out of its socket, it starts a chain of events within your body. Your brain depends on stimulation from the tooth’s root, once your tooth is gone, your brain receives no message asking for nutrients to maintain the area. The brain believes that there is no reason to support the area and the bone begins to wither away. Eventually, the bone loss will lead to sagging facial skin and hollow, sunken cheeks. Both of these events cause you to look much older. Additionally, your other teeth and bones are at risk of falling out as well, because of the effects of bone loss.

If you are missing one or more teeth, you need the proper dental care to maintain your existing teeth and save your jaw from bone loss. Contact our office to set up a no-obligation consultation so you can learn more about your options and how to stop bone loss before it starts.
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The vast majority of our patients understand the insidious nature of diabetes as well as the myriad of health risks associated with the disease. However, many patients are unaware of the ways diabetes and dental care connect. Diabetic patients often do not know that our dental office is a place where they can get care for diabetes-related oral health problems.

In our practice, we are committed to the health and well-being of all our patients. This is why we pass on as much helpful information as possible. If you have diabetes, we will do all that we can to meet your unique needs.

It may sound obvious, but many people have prediabetes or diabetes and do not know it. Several health questions can lead to the discovery of a patient’s risks for diabetes. While this does not replace a full medical screening, it can reveal important risk factors.

Here are some typical questions:
• Do your gums bleed when you brush or floss your teeth?
• Do you experience frequent unexplainable thirst?
• Are you more than ten-percent over your ideal body weight?
• Do you have any biological family with diabetes?

Questions similar to these make it possible for our dentist to suggest diabetic screening to patients believed to have high risks. An estimated 20 percent of all dental patients discover they are prediabetic or at risk for diabetes via screenings such as this.

Our dentists understand the increased risks of periodontal disease accompanying diabetes. Because of these risks, we believe it is essential for our diabetic patients to spend extra time on their daily oral care. Once gum disease strikes a diabetic patient, it is much more difficult to cure. The infection also adds strain on the body, putting the patient at risk for higher blood glucose levels. Additionally, diabetic patients tend to lose more teeth to periodontal disease than non-diabetic patients.

Another common difficulty our diabetic patients experience is slow healing. Healing time after procedures is a significant concern for dental implant patients. Fortunately, recent findings show that it is possible for diabetic patients to get implants successfully and that the additional healing time did not hinder the process.

If you have diabetes, be sure to share this information with our dentist. We are happy to work with you to help make your teeth healthy and strong. Learn more at https://buff.ly/2G6QAN8
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