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Reihan Salam
Works at R Street Institute
Attended P.S. 160
Lives in New York, NY
2,352 followers|7,146 views
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Reihan Salam

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It's happening. It's really, really happening. This logo is courtesy of +Rosten Woo.
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Reihan Salam

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Highways, fireplaces, and Christmas trees.
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Hmm. Sounds like Iron & Wine, Will Oldham and Swedish Depression Pop in a blender. I like it.
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Reihan Salam

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This is very interesting.
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I always wonder about your reading list because you seem to pull up a large variety of good stuff.
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Reihan Salam

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As Jared Diamond points out in Guns Germs and Steel (http://www.amazon.com/dp/0393061310/), humans caused ecological damage, particularly large animal extinctions, long before the Mesopotamian agriculture revolution. GGS also claims that human agricultural productivity were contributing factors to the decline of arrable land in areas where farming has existed the longest. The great cedar forests of Syria, the hanging gardens of Babylon, even the Fertile Crescent itself; Diamond gives as examples of societies over-leveraging their natural habitats' ability to support large populations and a society's inability to comprehend when such an over extension has taken place. A point that he explores further in the even better book Collapse (http://www.amazon.com/dp/0143117009/). Both are excellent books. Full of conjecture, to be sure, but great reading and backed up by interesting archaeological analysis of what our ancestors left behind.

Thank you for sharing.
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Have him in circles
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Reihan Salam

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David: on the culture element, I agree. There are lots of attractive things about the past, but also a great many of those advantages were restricted to white males. We have to develop a new social structure to account to for the inclusion of women and minorities. Nostalgia in this sense is culpably-racist to the degree that it identifies specifically with the white-maleness of the time, and it is non-culpably-racist to the degree it identifies with social institutions that were a byproduct of that white-maleness.

Also, on free trade: Krugman (http://goo.gl/xGNNv) specifically links to Rodrik (http://goo.gl/zsP1E), who says:

"In particular, since scale economies are not compatible with perfect competition, we find ourselves in a second-best world with all kinds of strange possibilities. Opening up to trade can leave some countries worse off, and in general trade-distorting policies like tariffs and subsidies can make individual countries better off. So be careful how you describe the world we live in..."

Same lesson - free trade is generally good, but often specifically bad, and this is understood by top trade theorists like Krugman. Read the Keynes piece I linked to earlier for more, if you haven't already.
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I could try. Learning the theremin at the moment. 
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(Via John M.)
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Entirely plausible. It wouldn't be the first time.
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"Conservatives also tend to think that loosening monetary policy is a kind of intervention in free markets, and therefore to be suspicious of it. But this is an error. Professor Hendrickson points out that in a system of free banking, with competitive note issue rather than a central bank, the desire for profit and the need for solvency would lead to the supply of banknotes roughly equaling the demand. In a fiat-money regime such as the one under which we, for better or worse, live, a central bank’s withholding of a sufficient supply of money is just as much of an intervention in the economy as its overproduction of it." -- Ramesh Ponnuru
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It's not just conservatives, though. Everyone thinks that, more or less. Sometimes I wonder if the reason so many people like the gold standard is that it was relatively easy to understand.
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Oh, I've been waiting for this alright.
Josh Levin originally shared:
 
The day you haven't been waiting for, but might have considered maybe, possibly waiting for if you knew it was coming: Day 1 of my "Big Man, Little Countries" travel series on Slate. Today: Andorra. Tomorrow through Friday: Monaco, San Marino, Liechtenstein ... and still more Liechtenstein!
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I'm horribly biased, having lived there and loved it, but I am sad to not see Luxembourg on the list. I suppose it just isn't small enough.

Cool project, though!
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People
Have him in circles
2,352 people
Philip Tinari's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Cultural Worker
Employment
  • R Street Institute
    Fellow, present
  • Economics 21
    2013
  • The New Republic
  • The Council on Foreign Relations
  • The New York Times
  • NBC News
  • The Atlantic
  • The New America Foundation
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
New York, NY
Previously
Brooklyn, NY - Ithaca, New York - Cambridge, Massachusetts - Washington, DC
Story
Introduction
I'm really hoping Google will open the social graph. Also: I like to read. 
Education
  • P.S. 160
  • P.S. 179
  • I.S. 201
  • Stuyvesant High School
  • Telluride Association Summer Program
  • Cornell University
  • Harvard University
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Other names
Pritu