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John D. Williams
Works at Law Offices of John D. Williams
Attended Southwestern University School of Law
Lives in Westlake Village, CA
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John D. Williams

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HORRIBLE, HORRIBLE HORRIBLE Service! Do no use their recommended VS card. Been trying for months to get credit for charge on card for product never received. On phone again with them. Do NOT get their VS card, worst card ever! Product was ordered 1/12/14, called after 2 months and found out product was not delivered. Said would not be charged, but charged and still trying to get amount $140 plus late fees off. A total nightmare!
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The IRS is your patient partner waiting to collect around 35% of what you own in the form of Death Taxes. Estate planning is necessary to make sure that your assets go to family and charitable recipients rather than to the IRS. Estate taxes are generally due within 9 months of death.
The following is a list of ideas and advice on steps you can take now to minimize the tax hit for your heirs.
1.  BASIC INFORMATION
Presently, the first $5,000,000 worth of assets will pass estate tax free on death, although the threshold is reduced by any "lifetime taxable gifts."
Each person has the ability to gift up to $13,000 per year to any other person, or to special trusts that are established for other people who have special withdrawal rights over these trusts.
For example, a married couple with three children could gift $78,000 worth of assets to their children or in trust for their benefit without this counting as a "taxable gift."
When a "taxable gift" is made by a donor a gift tax return is filed, but no gift tax is due until $1,000,000 in taxable gifts have been given by a donor.
For example, if a husband and wife have two children, then their annual gifting allowance is $52,000. If they gift $248,000 in one year, then each of them would have used $100,000 of his or her $1,000,000 lifetime gift tax exemption. Assuming they make no other taxable gifts, when each spouse dies, the first $1,900,000 would pass free of estate tax instead of $2,000,000.
While there was obviously intent to eliminate the estate tax, the $1,000,000 lifetime gift tax exemption has never been scheduled for expansion. This assures Washington, DC, that if the estate tax was repealed and then brought back, there would still be plenty of assets held by the older generation which would be subject to estate tax upon passage.
The exemption for 2011 and 2012 is $5,000,000, the exemption is scheduled to go to $1,000,000 in 2013, and there is no estate tax for people who die in 2010.
2.  STRATEGIES
It makes sense, therefore, to set aside wealth to be held outside the "taxable estate" of a financially successful individual by making use of the $13,000 per year per person gift tax exemption.
To concentrate on annual gifting clients may consider the following:
A.  Outright Gifts to Children and Grandchildren
This is the simplest form of gifting, but may result in unwise use of funds or gifted assets.
B.  Funding Uniform Gift to Minors Act Accounts
The two big problems with Uniform Gift to Minors Act Accounts are that at age 21 the assets have to be handed over to the child whether the parent wants to or not, and if the child causes an automobile accident or is sued for some other reason, the assets in the account are exposed to his or her creditor claims.
Where the person who funds the Uniform Gift to Minors Act Account also signs on the account as custodian, then under the estate tax law the account assets will be considered as owned by the custodian and taxable in that person's estate. This is why it is important to have someone other than the contributor be the custodian under the Uniform Gift to Minors Act Accounts.
C.  Establish 529 Accounts
The tax law allows certain plans to be funded for the purpose of providing college education and associated living expenses for family members. These plans are sponsored by states and administered by investment firms.
If the entire fund is spent on college tuition, support and living expenses during college and graduate school, then there is no tax whatsoever on the growth. If the funds are spent for other purposes, then the income within the 529 Plan Account is subject to tax as ordinary income, plus an additional 10% of that income is charged as an excise tax.
The contributions to these plans must be made in cash, and cannot be made in property.
The 529 rules also allow accelerated gifting by permitting front loading of the $13,000 per year gifting allowance for up to five years.
For example, instead of gifting $13,000 per year to or for the benefit of a grandchild, a grandparent might elect to put $65,000 into a 529 Plan in one year and to consider that to be a gift of $13,000 per year for the year of the gift and for the next four years. If the person dies before the fifth year, then the contributions attributable to the years that have not yet occurred are considered as added to the person's taxable estate.
Any further gifts during those years would be subject to the filing of a gift tax return and use of part of the lifetime gifting allowance.
D.  Irrevocable Gifting Trusts
Many clients have wisely chosen to establish and fund irrevocable trusts for their descendants.
While the client cannot maintain direct control over such a trust, the client can control who the trustee is, and can have the power to replace the trustee at any time and for any reason.
Typically the trust will provide that the trustee can make distributions to or for the children, and possibly even for a spouse, as reasonably needed.
On the death of the client or surviving spouse of the client, the trust will typically divide into separate equal shares for each child and may be held for the lifetime benefit of each child.
E.  Spousal Benefit Annual Exclusion Trust
A Spousal Benefit Annual Exclusion Trust would work like a gifting trust. It would permit a husband or wife who are married with three children and a grandchild to transfer $104,000 for 2011 and 2012 into a Trust for the lifetime benefit of the other spouse, children, and grandchildren. An additional $5,000 can be contributed each year if the trust is also given an annual withdrawal power.
The beneficiary spouse can be the trustee of this trust, and receive amounts as she might need for health, education, and maintenance during her lifetime. The beneficiary spouse might also have the right to appoint how the trust assets will be devised among children and grandchildren at the time of her eventual death.
The "Lifetime By-Pass Trust" is commonly used in conjunction with a Family Limited Partnership or Limited Liability Company to facilitate discounted gifting.
F.  Discounted Gifting
Many clients have wisely established family limited partnerships or limited liability companies, and then gifted partial ownership interests in these entities either to gifting trusts for the children or outright to the children.
Assuming a 30% discount, a 10% ownership interest in a family limited partnership holding $2,000,000 worth of assets may be worth for tax valuation purposes only $140,000. A gift of that 10% interest effectively removes $200,000 of actual value plus 10% of the partnership's future growth from the client's estate.
As stated above, a married couple with three children has the ability to gift $72,000 per year 2008 and $78,000 in 2009 in value without making a "taxable gift." Assuming no other gifting and a 28% or more valuation discount, if this couple gifts a 5% interest in a $2,000,000 family limited partnership, then there would be no reportable gift, although the couple will have removed $100,000 in value from their taxable estates, assuming that there is proper structuring and administration of the limited partnership.
The IRS does not like these discounts, but many court cases support them. The amount of discount to be taken will vary based upon the circumstances of the partnership or LLC arrangement. For large gifts, we recommend appraisal reports to determine the discount amount to be taken.
G.  Family Limited Partnership and Gifting Trust
This technique provides significant estate and gift tax planning utility, while also providing a significant degree of creditor protection for the client who can remain in control of the partnership arrangement.
It is often advantageous to make the trustee of the gifting trust a one-half of 1% general partner and the client or clients the other one-half of 1% general partner in order to divide control of the entity for discounting and other purposes.
Properly structured gift trusts and family limited partnerships may be disregarded for income tax purposes, so that no separate tax returns need to be filed for these entities. As a result of this, the grantor or grantors of the trust simply report all of the income and deductions of the limited partnership and the trust on their personal return.
Clients with family limited partnerships who have not engaged in annual gifting may wish to begin doing so based upon the greater possibility of an active estate tax existing for the foreseeable future.
H.  Freeze Transactions
The most effective wealth transfer techniques now available involve "freeze transactions" whereby future growth in investments can be channeled to trusts that benefit a spouse and/or descendants. An example would be the ability to sell an ownership interest in a family limited partnership to a trust for children in exchange for a long-term low interest promissory note. A client holding $1,000,000 of investments could sell those investments to a Gifting Trust in exchange for a 9-year interest only 2.95% promissory note, and this would not be considered a gift. When the investments double in value, the only thing owed back to the client is the $1,000,000 plus interest at 2.95%. The excess growth inures to the Gifting Trust.
If the same client owns a 50% limited partner interest in a limited partnership owning $2,000,000 in assets, then the 50% limited partnership interest, representing $1,000,000 in assets, might be sold to the Gifting Trust for a $650,000 promissory note, taking into account a 35% valuation discount. Now, the growth on $1,000,000 worth of assets inures to the trust for the children, which owes back only $650,000 plus interest at 2.95% to the parent. Conceptually, this immediately moves $350,000 worth of wealth from the parent's taxable estate, and if the $1,000,000 worth of assets increases to $2,000,000 worth of assets, the difference between $2,000,000 and $650,000 plus interest at 2.95% has been shifted to the trust for the children.
Another technique involves something called a Grantor Retained Annuity Trust (GRAT). Under a GRAT, assets are simply transferred from the Grantor to a trust that pays a stream of monies and/or assets back to the Grantor based upon giving the Grantor a rate of return of approximately 4%. Any growth over the 4% rate of return can be held in the trust for the lifetime benefit of the Grantor's spouse and/or descendants without ever being subject to federal estate taxes. A properly tuned GRAT will use very little, if any, gift tax exclusion, but can obviously cause a significant amount of assets to pass estate tax free.
I.  Qualified Personal Residence Trust
The estate tax law specifically condones placing a home or a vacation home in a "personal residence trust" whereby the donor retains the right to live in the home for a term of years, and thereafter the home can be rented from the trust with all trust value thereafter inuring to other family members. With real estate values now being low, many clients are considering a transfer of their vacation properties or personal homes to qualified personal residence trusts.
3.  TIME FOR ESTATE PLAN UPDATE?
Typically we find that three to four years after preparing estate planning documents, a review of financial and family information will result in appropriate changes being made for family protection purposes.
Please call (818) 991-6664 or email us now to make an appointment.
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NO RECOVERY  - NO FEE
If you suffer a personal injury, you must file your lawsuit before the applicable deadline, known as the "statute of limitations," passes or your claim will be forever barred. It is therefore of the utmost importance that if you have suffered a personal injury and you believe someone else is responsible for causing that injury, that you immediately consult with an attorney. The specific time limitation will depend on the type of injury and the circumstances. As a general rule, a personal injury negligence lawsuit in California must be filed within two (2) years of the date the injury occurred. However, under some circumstances, you must take action in less than two years. For example, if you believe that a governmental entity is responsible for causing your injury, you must file a claim within six (6) months of the injury. Similarly, there are other shortened time limitations. There are separate time limitations for malpractice actions against professionals. Therefore, you must speak with a lawyer concerning your particular case immediately.
 If you wait until near the end of the period to file a claim or lawsuit, your attorney may not have enough time to help you. Consequently, if you have suffered a Personal Injury Claim, it is essential that you immediately consult with an experienced attorney.
 Should you require assistance with a Personal Injury Claim, please call (818) 991-6664 or e-mail now for an immediate free evaluation of your case. If we decide to accept your case, we advance all costs and if there is no recovery there is no fee.
 We are centrally located to represent clients throughout California, in Los Angeles County and Ventura County, including Camarillo, Moorpark, Newbury Park, Oak Park, Ojai, Oxnard, Simi Valley, Thousand Oaks, Ventura, Westlake Village, Agoura Hills, Calabasas, Canoga Park, Chatsworth, Encino, Granada Hills, Malibu, Northridge, Reseda, San Fernando Valley, Sepulveda, Sherman Oaks, Tarzana, Van Nuys, West Hills, Woodland Hills.
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NO RECOVERY NO FEE
Identify the witnesses
Make a doctor appointment
Take pictures of you car and injuries
Keep notes about your injuries
You need proof of all accident related expenses
Insurance adjuster may say your claim is much less
The insurance company is not on your side

Identify the witnesses (including the responsible party) so there will be someone to support your case if it goes to court. Write down their names and addresses and interview them. Ask them what they saw and make a note of phrases they used like "slammed into," "plowed," "speeding," or "he ran the red light." Beware of insurance representatives at the accident scene. It has been rumored that some insurance companies send adjusters to accident scenes in order to catch people off guard with incriminating questions or to have them sign away any rights they may have to future compensation.
 Schedule a doctor's appointment as soon as possible after the accident so the adjuster cannot question your injury. Insurance adjusters frequently ask us, "If your client was truly hurt, why did he wait so long to see a doctor?" We all can be reluctant to seek medical treatment when we're injured; we want to tough it out. But if you're hurt, you need to pursue medical treatment immediately.
 Take pictures of your car immediately after the accident. When the adjuster asks for proof of the accident, it is difficult to dispute a picture taken of your car at the accident scene. Pictures of the damage will help tell your story. If possible, take pictures of the other cars involved in the accident as well. These picture will help supply information about the severity of the impact associated with your accident.
 Take pictures of your injuries before they heal. In many cases, the seat belt strap will bruise our clients across their shoulder and chest, but after several weeks those bruises heal. Months later, when the insurance adjuster is arguing that the crash was not very significant, pictures of your bruises and other injuries will help solidify your claim of injury.
 Keep notes about your injuries. In six or seven months, you might forget how it hurt just to get dressed, and the adjuster will try to make it seem like any description you give is an exaggeration. Write down your pain medications. Get letters from your employer and family describing how the injury has changed your life. These kinds of written documents are invaluable when presenting your claim to the insurance adjuster or to a judge and jury in court.
 The adjuster will ask for proof of anything you claim as an expense. Be sure you keep receipts for prescriptions, household services like lawn-mowing and getting someone to cook for you, car rentals, and so forth. Keep each of those receipts so you can document every expense.
 The insurance adjuster may try to tell you that your claim is worth much less than it really is. It is his or her job to save the insurance company money by settling your claim for as little as possible. The adjuster will try to make your claim seem unimportant. Without legal help from injury lawyers like us, you may have no idea of the real value of your claim.
 The bottom line is that the insurance company is not on your side. Their goal is to make as much money as possible by giving you as little as possible for your injuries. Whether you choose the Law Offices of John D. Williams to represent you or not, you need an experienced, tough law firm on your side. Don't go it alone.
 Should you require assistance with a Personal Injury Claim, please call (818) 991-6664 or email us now for an immediate free evaluation of your case. If we decide to accept your case, we advance all costs and if there is no recovery there is no fee.
 We are centrally located to represent clients throughout California, in Los Angeles County and Ventura County, including Camarillo, Moorpark, Newbury Park, Oak Park, Ojai, Oxnard, Simi Valley, Thousand Oaks, Ventura, Westlake Village, Agoura Hills, Calabasas, Canoga Park, Chatsworth, Encino, Granada Hills, Malibu, Northridge, Reseda, San Fernando Valley, Sepulveda, Sherman Oaks, Tarzana, Van Nuys, West Hills, Woodland Hills.
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NO RECOVERY NO FEE
Do I need to hire a lawyer?
Maybe. In this day and age, even the simplest of car accident cases may require the services of an attorney. Many insurance companies have been known to make settlement of claims, especially claims involving whiplash injuries, very difficult for individuals without the representation of an attorney. Even though you will pay your attorney a fee for handling your case, in many instances, it is worth it, because the settlement or final award you receive is greater with an attorney than without. 

How much is my claim worth?
It depends on many factors. In most cases, if someone else's negligence caused the car accident and resulted in your injuries, you should be entitled to payment of your bills plus compensation for pain and suffering. If you were seriously injured and missed time from work, you may be entitled to compensation for lost wages or loss of earnings capacity in addition to payment of your medical bills and pain and suffering. Also, you may be entitled to recover for emotional distress, even if your injuries were not debilitating. Generally, the more seriously injured you are, the more the monetary value of your case is, because you have more pain and suffering, medical bills, lost time from work, and other expenses. Again, many firms handling car accident cases resulting in whiplash or other injuries will offer a free first consultation to discuss these issues with you. 
 What if I wasn't injured, but my car was damaged or totaled?
In most cases, your property damage can be settled fairly quickly and efficiently, even if you have to take the car for more than one estimate. Many times, you will not need an attorney to handle the property damage from a car accident, even if you need an attorney to handle a personal injury claim from the same accident. You probably will not be entitled to recover more than the value of the repairs to your car or the value of the car if it was totaled. Because of that, if you hire an attorney for a fee, paying that fee may reduce the amount you are able to put toward your car. If you have an attorney representing you on a personal injury claim, you should check with your attorney to see if he or she will help you with your property damage claim. 
 What if I didn't think I was injured at the time, but I felt hurt later?
You should immediately consult your medical provider regarding any pain, discomfort or possible injuries from a car accident, even if you think they may be only minor injuries or whiplash. Contrary to some common misperceptions, whiplash injuries from car accidents can be very serious. Only your doctor can answer your medical questions.
Even if you did not complain of whiplash or other injuries at the scene of the car accident, if you were injured in the accident from someone else's negligence, you may be entitled to payment of your medical bills, compensation for pain and suffering, lost wages, loss of earnings capacity, and/or emotional distress. You should consult an attorney to discuss whether you need representation on your claim. 
 What if the driver who hit me in the accident wasn't insured?
Unfortunately, many drivers are not insured, even though the law requires insurance. However, your own insurance may cover your claims, depending on your policy. Also, if you were a passenger, the driver's insurance or the owner's insurance of the car in which you were a passenger may be responsible for your claims. It is very important to explore all the options regarding insurance if you have been injured in a car accident, and this can be somewhat complicated. Attorneys who handle car accident cases should be very familiar with insurance issues. 
 How much will it cost me to hire a lawyer?
It varies, but many law firms that represent people who were injured in car accidents will work for a contingency fee; in other words, the fee is a percentage of any settlement or verdict. By hiring a lawyer this way, you save yourself a great deal of out-of-pocket, up-front expenses. Also, some lawyers who work for a contingency fee will advance the costs associated with your case (the costs of copies, filing fees, investigation, depositions, etc.), which again keeps your out-of-pocket, up-front expenses to a minimum. After your case settles or is tried, your costs and fees come out of any settlement or verdict. 
 Should I talk to my insurance company about the accident?
At first, only talk to your insurance company to notify them that an accident occurred. Before giving detailed statements, and especially tape recorded statements or interviews, to either your insurance company or the insurance company of the person who hit you, you should carefully evaluate whether you may first want legal representation. Insurance companies often want to settle the matter quickly, and this may be before you know the full extent of your injuries. If you make a settlement agreement with an insurance company, and then discover later that you have additional medical bills or time off work for which you were not compensated, you probably will not be able to get more money later.
Many law firms that handle cases for people who have been injured in car accidents offer free initial consultations. Before having settlement discussions with an insurance company, you may want to consult an attorney to discuss these issues. 
 How long will it take to get a settlement?
It depends. Some cases settle quickly, literally within a few weeks, and some cases take much longer. It doesn't always depend on how seriously injured you are, but oftentimes it depends on which insurance companies are involved, whether who is at fault for the accident is disputed, whether your treatment for your injuries is ongoing or completed, whether the case can be settled without formal litigation or whether a lawsuit must be filed, and many other factors. Your attorney will have a better idea of the time frame after he or she has had the opportunity to review the file and talk with the insurance companies and/or other attorneys involved. 
 Uninsured Motorist Coverage
Q: I maintain only the amount of insurance that is required by law in California. That means that if I get in an accident, I'm covered for any injuries I sustain, doesn't it?
A: No. Maintaining the amount required by law means only that you are complying with the law. It does not mean that in all situations you will be covered. For example, uninsured motorist coverage is not required by law, it can be waived, however the chances of you being hit by an uninsured driver in California are quite high. Despite the fact that you carry the mandatory amount of insurance, this will not protect you if you are hit by an uninsured driver. Uninsured motorist coverage provides that if your are involved in an accident with another driver who is at fault and does not have insurance, your insurance company will provide coverage, minus your deductible. If you do not have uninsured motorist coverage, it is possible you will not be able to recover anything for any damage or injuries sustained in an accident with an uninsured driver if you are not at fault. 
 Releases
Q: I was involved in a automobile accident recently, it was the other driver's fault. The other driver and I exchanged all the necessary insurance information and I called the insurance company and they said they will pay for all the damage to my car, but I have to sign a release. Is it okay to sign the release?
A: Most likely, it is okay to sign the release, but read it very thoroughly first. If the insurance company is offering only to pay for your property damage, make sure that the release states that this release is for property damage only. Many times releases are very general and release the insurance company and the insured from any and all claims arising from this particular accident. For example, if you don't think you suffered any visible injuries at the time of the accident, but were extremely sore for some time after the accident, it may be an indication that you have suffered some type of injury and might need future medical care. If you sign a general release and find out later that the your bad back or trick knee really did originate from the accident most likely you will not be able to receive any compensation for your medical bills. Even if you did not know of the injuries at the time you signed the release.
 Comparative Negligence
Q: It is my understanding that if I am at fault at all for an accident even if the other driver is equally or more at fault, I cannot recover anything, is that true?
A: It is true in some states, however California is not one of those states. California subscribes to the comparative theory of negligence. What that means is that if you were at fault, you can still recover, however your recovery will be reduced by whatever amount of fault you are apportioned. Thus, if you were driving inattentively and were involved in an accident where the other driver was driving completely recklessly. It might be found that you are 20% at fault for not paying more attention, and the other driver is found to be 80% at fault. If you were awarded $10,000, it would be reduced by 20% or $2,000. If you were found not to be at fault at all, then the award would not be reduced. 
 Alternative Dispute Resolution
Q: I've heard a lot about something called "ADR" what is it and is it important?
A: "ADR" stands for Alternative Dispute Resolution. It has become a very important mechanism in the legal community. In response to the amount of time it takes to pursue a lawsuit, in California it is generally twelve months to two years from the time of filing a lawsuit before getting to court.  The legal community has been exploring alternatives to the court system. The majority of the alternatives are done in conjunction with the court system and are designed to get timely and equitable results without having to go to trial. Some of these alternatives include mediation, settlement conferences and arbitration. All of these alternatives are designed to save both plaintiffs and defendants time and money while pursuing a mutually desirable result. Many times, cases are settled through these techniques. However, these techniques are not necessarily the best for all cases. It should be viewed on a case by case basis. Even after participating in some type of ADR a case still may go to trial. But it is an option that exists and in many cases has facilitated results without having to resort to a trial.   
 Loss of Consortium
Q: My wife was seriously injured in an automobile accident which was not her fault. She spent a month in the hospital and will need to spend at least two more months recuperating at home. We have two small children. I have had to take a lot of time off work to take care of the children and my wife. It has substantially affected my life, especially my job. My wife is pursuing a claim against the driver of the other vehicle for her injuries. Is there any way I can recover for the loss I have endured in my life because of this accident?
A: Consortium is defined as the right of each spouse to the company, society, co-operation, affection and aid of the other in every conjugal relation. Loss of consortium is a separate cause of action resulting from the injury to one's spouse. Indirectly, through the wife's injury, the husband has sustained an injury as well, in that he has to take over all the responsibilities that were previously shared, as well as losing the affections of his spouse, either permanently or temporarily) through injuries sustained as a result of the negligent actions of others. 
 Jurisdiction
Q: I am a resident of California. This past summer my family and I drove out to Colorado to visit my sister. While driving through Nevada we were rear ended by another driver. He was from Washington on his summer vacation as well. Can I sue him in California for the damage to the car and the injuries my family sustained as a result of the accident?
A: Where you can sue depends on the jurisdiction of the court. Jurisdiction refers to the court's authority to hear a case. Jurisdiction is determined by statute as well as common law. There are two kinds of jurisdiction, subject matter jurisdiction and personal jurisdiction. Subject Matter jurisdiction refers to the matter in dispute. In this case is would be the collision of the cars. Personal Jurisdiction refers to the people involved in the dispute. Depending on the circumstances surrounding the accident, you may be able to bring suit in California. More likely, though, the place of the accident will be the correct venue.  However, even if a California Court is found to have both subject matter and personal jurisdiction it does not necessarily mean that the law of that state will be used. Very often in the example above if jurisdiction was found in California, Nevada law may still be applied by the California Court since the accident occurred in Nevada.  Jurisdiction can be a complex issue.
 Please call (818) 991-6664 or email us  now for an immediate free evaluation of your case.   If we decide to accept your case, we advance all costs and if there is no recovery there is no fee.
 We are centrally located to represent clients throughout California, in Los Angeles County and Ventura County, including Camarillo, Moorpark, Newbury Park, Oak Park, Ojai, Oxnard, Simi Valley, Thousand Oaks, Ventura, Westlake Village, Agoura Hills, Calabasas, Canoga Park, Chatsworth, Encino, Granada Hills, Malibu, Northridge, Reseda, San Fernando Valley, Sepulveda, Sherman Oaks, Tarzana, Van Nuys, West Hills, Woodland Hills. 
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Occupation
Attorney, Principal Law Offices of John D. Williams 2625 Townsgate Road, Suite 330, Westlake Village, CA 91361 Phone (818) 991-6664, Fax (818) 991-0669
Employment
  • Law Offices of John D. Williams
    Attorney, Principal, 1982 - present
  • Los Angeles Superior Court
    Juvenile Dependency Tort Panel Attorney, 1994 - 2012
  • Los Angeles Superior Court
    Judge Pro Tem, 1988 - 1998
  • Ventura County Superior Court
    Judge Pro Tem, 1998 - 1999
  • San Fernando Valley Bar Association
    Senior Citizens Legal Program, 1986 - 1998
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Westlake Village, CA
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Work
Phone
818-991-6664
Fax
818-991-0669
Address
2625 Townsgate Road Suite 330 Westlake Village, CA 91361
Story
Introduction
Litigation, personal injury, auto accidents, real estate, estate planning, wills and trusts, estate administration and probate attorney and lawyer. Serving clients needs one case at a time for over 30 years. Better Business Bureau A+ Rating. Martindale-Hubbell Peer Review Rated Legal Ability High to Very High and General Recommendation Very High. Martindale-Hubbell Client Review Preeminent Rating. Firm has Martindale-Hubbell Client Review Preeminent Rating.
Bragging rights
Juvenile Dependency Tort Panel Attorney, Los Angeles Superior Court; Judge Pro Tem, Los Angeles Superior Court; Judge Pro Tem, Ventura County Superior Court; Corporations Counsel, California Dept. of Corporations; State Bar Pro Bono Award; Member Los Angles and Ventura County Bar Association, Ventura County Trial Lawyers Association, Better Business Bureau, State Bar of California, San Fernando Valley Bar Association, 1983-1996, Senior Citizen Legal Program, 1983-1987.
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  • Southwestern University School of Law
    Law
  • University of California, Los Angeles
    Psychology
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Excellent service from Farzad Mehzi and Sally Alatorre! Manager and loan officer are incompetent, rude, arrogant and do not know what they are doing regarding purchasing foreign currency. They were both argumentative and clearly wrong and have poor people skills. Thank god that Farzad and Sally work there and were very knowledgeable and helpful in opening an account and purchasing foreign currency. They should be running this branch.
Public - 3 weeks ago
reviewed 3 weeks ago
Terrible bank! Called repeatedly for 4 hours never answer phone. Finally go to branch to get currency exchange insist must open a checking or saving account. Do and make large deposit to get exchange. Then man gives exchange rate and it shows very low and tell lady in charge that is a lot of money to make. Go home call another bank and exchange is $19 more for $100 and they will deliver for free. Immediately return to bank and close account. Had account with BOA years ago and now I see why I closed it back then. I will never do business with BOA again. I recommend most another other bank. BOA stands for everything that is bad in America, CORPORATE GREED at the expense of the people.
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Public - a month ago
reviewed a month ago
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