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Remove The High Places | Periscope 8/21/16
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GOVERNMENT WRONGFULLY DEDUCTS $78 MILLION FROM PAYMENTS TO DISABLED COMBAT VETERANS, SENATORS BOOZMAN AND WARNER INTRODUCE LEGISLATION TO RIGHT INJUSTICE
Boozman, Warner Seek to Protect Combat-Injured Veterans From Being Wrongfully Deprived of Full Severance
National Veterans Legal Services Program Informs Capitol Hill about Wrongful Withholding

WASHINGTON – U.S. Senators John Boozman (R-AR) and Mark Warner (D-VA) today introduced bipartisan legislation to ensure that veterans who suffer service-ending combat-related injuries are not taxed on the severance payment they receive from the Department of Defense (DOD).

Under federal law, veterans who suffer combat-related injuries and who are separated from the military are not supposed to be taxed on the one-time lump sum disability severance payment they receive from DOD.

Unfortunately, taxes on combat-related disability severance payments have nonetheless been withheld from qualifying veterans for a number of years due to the limitations of DOD’s automated payment system. Veterans are typically unaware that their benefits were improperly reduced as a result of DOD’s actions.

The Combat-Injured Veterans Tax Fairness Act of 2016, introduced by Boozman and Warner, corrects this problem by directing DOD to identify veterans who have been separated from service for combat-related injuries and received a severance payment. The bill instructs DOD to determine how much the combat-wounded veterans are owed and allow veterans who have been improperly taxed to recover the withheld amounts.

“It is absolutely wrong to deprive combat-injured veterans of their full severance upon separation. This has to be corrected. DOD has unjustly withheld taxes despite clearly-written federal law and a court opinion to the contrary. We have a responsibility to right this wrong and ensure that our nation’s wounded veterans receive the benefits they are rightfully due,” Boozman said.

“The intent of Congress, federal law and Department of Defense policy are all very clear: Service members separated as a result of combat-related injuries are not to have their severance pay taxed. It’s unbelievable that Congress has to act in order to ensure that the law is followed and that veterans who have already sacrificed so much receive every penny of their severance. Our legislation requires the Department of Defense to identify and notify individuals whose payments were reduced by improperly withheld taxes, and also extends the statute of limitations to ensure that those who were wronged long ago can still receive their full and proper payments,” Warner said.

The problem was originally identified by the National Veterans Legal Services Program (NVLSP), an independent, nonprofit veterans service organization that has served active duty military personnel and veterans since 1980.

“Most troubling is that we learned the government had known about this problem for decades yet continued to take this money from thousands of disabled veterans. After exploring all legal options, we concluded that the only large-scale fix to this problem was through legislation, and we are so grateful that Senator Boozman and Senator Warner are sponsoring this bill. The sad truth is that the government essentially stole $78 million dollars from disabled combat veterans because of an accounting problem it’s known about for years. To help undo the harm caused by this egregious oversight, we hope this legislation is passed quickly,” Tom Moore, attorney and manager of the Lawyers Serving Warriors project at NVLSP, said.

Moore worked on the issue with the pro-bono assistance of Frederick Eames, a partner at law firm Hunton & Williams.

NVLSP estimates that over 13,800 veterans potentially have been denied full severance pay as a result of wrongful taxation, including 165 veterans in Arkansas and 720 veterans in Virginia.

While introducing the bill, Boozman and Warner highlighted the financial burdens placed on two of their constituents—Brandon Davis of Greenwood, Arkansas and Leon Hill of Norfolk, Virginia.

“I was discharged from the Army due to combat-related injuries in 2005, a year after I was engaged in several enemy attacks during a deployment to Iraq. While I was going through the medical discharge process, I recall hearing that there was a computer problem related to disability severance payments, but no one ever explained what I needed to do to recover the money that was taken from me,” Davis said. “The government took eight thousand dollars from me without explaining that I could have recovered all of this money. This money would have helped me and my family as we adjusted to life after being discharged from the military. Because eleven years have passed since the money was taken, now I have no way to get it back unless this legislation is passed.”

“The government took more than $11,000 from my disability severance check after I was involuntarily separated from the Navy due to combat-related disabilities,” Hill said. “During my medical discharge proceedings, I received very little guidance. No one ever explained the tax issue to me. I didn't even know I had been shortchanged until Mr. Moore from NVLSP called me to explain the issue. Now I understand that there is no way to recover the money that was taken from me without this legislation.”

Estimates for affected veterans in other states available by request.

BACKGROUND ON THE NEED FOR THE LEGISLATION
One-time lump sum disability severance payments to active duty service members have been excluded from taxable income since a 1991 court ruling. This exclusion has been codified into the Department of Defense’s Financial Management Regulation, and also clarified in regulations used by the service branches. Due to limitations in its accounting system, DFAS knowingly took $78 million in “tax payments” from combat disabled service members. To recoup wrongfully withheld funds, veterans could have filed an amended tax return with the Internal Revenue Service, but most of the thousands of veterans affected are outside of the three-year period in which they can file an amended tax return. Only legislation passed by Congress and signed into law by the President can correct this injustice.

MEDIA CONTACTS
For NVLSP: Ami Neiberger-Miller, 703.887.4877, ami@steppingstoneLLC.com
For Senator Boozman's Office: Patrick Creamer, 202.224-4843, patrick_Creamer@boozman.senate.gov 
Boozman Statement on Meeting With Judge Garland. WASHINGTON –U.S. Senator John Boozman (R-AR) released the following statement after meeting with Supreme Court nominee Judge Merrick Garland: “Americans deserve a voice on the future di... Read More ...
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GOVERNMENT WRONGFULLY DEDUCTS $78 MILLION FROM PAYMENTS TO DISABLED COMBAT VETERANS, SENATORS BOOZMAN AND WARNER INTRODUCE LEGISLATION TO RIGHT INJUSTICE
Boozman, Warner Seek to Protect Combat-Injured Veterans From Being Wrongfully Deprived of Full Severance
National Veterans Legal Services Program Informs Capitol Hill about Wrongful Withholding

WASHINGTON – U.S. Senators John Boozman (R-AR) and Mark Warner (D-VA) today introduced bipartisan legislation to ensure that veterans who suffer service-ending combat-related injuries are not taxed on the severance payment they receive from the Department of Defense (DOD).

Under federal law, veterans who suffer combat-related injuries and who are separated from the military are not supposed to be taxed on the one-time lump sum disability severance payment they receive from DOD.

Unfortunately, taxes on combat-related disability severance payments have nonetheless been withheld from qualifying veterans for a number of years due to the limitations of DOD’s automated payment system. Veterans are typically unaware that their benefits were improperly reduced as a result of DOD’s actions.

The Combat-Injured Veterans Tax Fairness Act of 2016, introduced by Boozman and Warner, corrects this problem by directing DOD to identify veterans who have been separated from service for combat-related injuries and received a severance payment. The bill instructs DOD to determine how much the combat-wounded veterans are owed and allow veterans who have been improperly taxed to recover the withheld amounts.

“It is absolutely wrong to deprive combat-injured veterans of their full severance upon separation. This has to be corrected. DOD has unjustly withheld taxes despite clearly-written federal law and a court opinion to the contrary. We have a responsibility to right this wrong and ensure that our nation’s wounded veterans receive the benefits they are rightfully due,” Boozman said.

“The intent of Congress, federal law and Department of Defense policy are all very clear: Service members separated as a result of combat-related injuries are not to have their severance pay taxed. It’s unbelievable that Congress has to act in order to ensure that the law is followed and that veterans who have already sacrificed so much receive every penny of their severance. Our legislation requires the Department of Defense to identify and notify individuals whose payments were reduced by improperly withheld taxes, and also extends the statute of limitations to ensure that those who were wronged long ago can still receive their full and proper payments,” Warner said.

The problem was originally identified by the National Veterans Legal Services Program (NVLSP), an independent, nonprofit veterans service organization that has served active duty military personnel and veterans since 1980.

“Most troubling is that we learned the government had known about this problem for decades yet continued to take this money from thousands of disabled veterans. After exploring all legal options, we concluded that the only large-scale fix to this problem was through legislation, and we are so grateful that Senator Boozman and Senator Warner are sponsoring this bill. The sad truth is that the government essentially stole $78 million dollars from disabled combat veterans because of an accounting problem it’s known about for years. To help undo the harm caused by this egregious oversight, we hope this legislation is passed quickly,” Tom Moore, attorney and manager of the Lawyers Serving Warriors project at NVLSP, said.

Moore worked on the issue with the pro-bono assistance of Frederick Eames, a partner at law firm Hunton & Williams.

NVLSP estimates that over 13,800 veterans potentially have been denied full severance pay as a result of wrongful taxation, including 165 veterans in Arkansas and 720 veterans in Virginia.

While introducing the bill, Boozman and Warner highlighted the financial burdens placed on two of their constituents—Brandon Davis of Greenwood, Arkansas and Leon Hill of Norfolk, Virginia.

“I was discharged from the Army due to combat-related injuries in 2005, a year after I was engaged in several enemy attacks during a deployment to Iraq. While I was going through the medical discharge process, I recall hearing that there was a computer problem related to disability severance payments, but no one ever explained what I needed to do to recover the money that was taken from me,” Davis said. “The government took eight thousand dollars from me without explaining that I could have recovered all of this money. This money would have helped me and my family as we adjusted to life after being discharged from the military. Because eleven years have passed since the money was taken, now I have no way to get it back unless this legislation is passed.”

“The government took more than $11,000 from my disability severance check after I was involuntarily separated from the Navy due to combat-related disabilities,” Hill said. “During my medical discharge proceedings, I received very little guidance. No one ever explained the tax issue to me. I didn't even know I had been shortchanged until Mr. Moore from NVLSP called me to explain the issue. Now I understand that there is no way to recover the money that was taken from me without this legislation.”

Estimates for affected veterans in other states available by request.

BACKGROUND ON THE NEED FOR THE LEGISLATION
One-time lump sum disability severance payments to active duty service members have been excluded from taxable income since a 1991 court ruling. This exclusion has been codified into the Department of Defense’s Financial Management Regulation, and also clarified in regulations used by the service branches. Due to limitations in its accounting system, DFAS knowingly took $78 million in “tax payments” from combat disabled service members. To recoup wrongfully withheld funds, veterans could have filed an amended tax return with the Internal Revenue Service, but most of the thousands of veterans affected are outside of the three-year period in which they can file an amended tax return. Only legislation passed by Congress and signed into law by the President can correct this injustice.

MEDIA CONTACTS
For NVLSP: Ami Neiberger-Miller, 703.887.4877, ami@steppingstoneLLC.com
For Senator Boozman's Office: Patrick Creamer, 202.224-4843, patrick_Creamer@boozman.senate.gov 
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richard barwick

Military Spouses  - 
 
Are You An Atomic Veteran?

An Atomic Veteran is defined in legislation as a veteran who, as part of his or her military service:
Participated in an above-ground nuclear test, 1945 – 1962; or
Was part of the U.S. military occupation forces in/around Hiroshima/Nagasaki before 1946; or
Was held as a POW in or near Hiroshima or Nagasaki (certain cases).
Adverse Health Conditions You should Know About

Presumptive Cancers

If you have developed a “Presumptive Cancer,” which is presumed to be due to radiation exposure during your military service, all you have to do is verify that you are an Atomic Veteran to be eligible for disability compensation. Your service connection is established without considering the does received.

There are 21 presumptive cancers defined by law:

1. Leukemia (except chronic lymphocytic leukemia)
2. Cancer of the thyroid
3. Breast
4. Pharynx
5. Esophagus
6. Stomach
7. Small intestine
8. Pancreas
9. Bile ducts
10. Gall Bladder
11. Salivary glands
12. Urinary tract (kidneys, renal pelvis, ureter, urinary bladder and urethra)
13. Bone
14. Brain
15. Colon
16. Lung
17.Ovary
18. Lymphomas (except Hodgkin’s disease)
19. Multiple Myeloma
20. Primary Liver cancer (except if cirrhosis or hepatitis B is indicated)
21. Bronchio-Alveolar carcinoma (a rare lung cancer)

Nonpresumptive Cancers or Conditions

If you have developed a “nonpresumptive cancer or condition,” VA will consider additional factors to determine your entitlement to compensation based on radiation exposure. These include the amount of your radiation exposure and the elapsed time between exposure and the onset of the disease. An estimate is based on scientific principles, records maintained by the Department of Defense, and information you provide to VA and the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), which runs NTPR.

What Benefits May I Be Eligible For?

Atomic Veterans who have developed one of several specific cancers or nonmalignant conditions, may be eligible for compensation and/or free VA medical care. This compensation would be in the form of a partial or full service-connected disability allowance, including potential payments to your surviving spouse or children.

For more information contact the Radiation Exposure Compensation Program (RECA) at 800-729-7327.
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richard barwick

Discussion  - 
 
Are You An Atomic Veteran?

An Atomic Veteran is defined in legislation as a veteran who, as part of his or her military service:
Participated in an above-ground nuclear test, 1945 – 1962; or
Was part of the U.S. military occupation forces in/around Hiroshima/Nagasaki before 1946; or
Was held as a POW in or near Hiroshima or Nagasaki (certain cases).
Adverse Health Conditions You should Know About

Presumptive Cancers

If you have developed a “Presumptive Cancer,” which is presumed to be due to radiation exposure during your military service, all you have to do is verify that you are an Atomic Veteran to be eligible for disability compensation. Your service connection is established without considering the does received.

There are 21 presumptive cancers defined by law:

1. Leukemia (except chronic lymphocytic leukemia)
2. Cancer of the thyroid
3. Breast
4. Pharynx
5. Esophagus
6. Stomach
7. Small intestine
8. Pancreas
9. Bile ducts
10. Gall Bladder
11. Salivary glands
12. Urinary tract (kidneys, renal pelvis, ureter, urinary bladder and urethra)
13. Bone
14. Brain
15. Colon
16. Lung
17.Ovary
18. Lymphomas (except Hodgkin’s disease)
19. Multiple Myeloma
20. Primary Liver cancer (except if cirrhosis or hepatitis B is indicated)
21. Bronchio-Alveolar carcinoma (a rare lung cancer)

Nonpresumptive Cancers or Conditions

If you have developed a “nonpresumptive cancer or condition,” VA will consider additional factors to determine your entitlement to compensation based on radiation exposure. These include the amount of your radiation exposure and the elapsed time between exposure and the onset of the disease. An estimate is based on scientific principles, records maintained by the Department of Defense, and information you provide to VA and the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), which runs NTPR.

What Benefits May I Be Eligible For?

Atomic Veterans who have developed one of several specific cancers or nonmalignant conditions, may be eligible for compensation and/or free VA medical care. This compensation would be in the form of a partial or full service-connected disability allowance, including potential payments to your surviving spouse or children.

For more information contact the Radiation Exposure Compensation Program (RECA) at 800-729-7327.
1
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Discussion  - 
 
GOVERNMENT WRONGFULLY DEDUCTS $78 MILLION FROM PAYMENTS TO DISABLED COMBAT VETERANS, SENATORS BOOZMAN AND WARNER INTRODUCE LEGISLATION TO RIGHT INJUSTICE
Boozman, Warner Seek to Protect Combat-Injured Veterans From Being Wrongfully Deprived of Full Severance
National Veterans Legal Services Program Informs Capitol Hill about Wrongful Withholding

WASHINGTON – U.S. Senators John Boozman (R-AR) and Mark Warner (D-VA) today introduced bipartisan legislation to ensure that veterans who suffer service-ending combat-related injuries are not taxed on the severance payment they receive from the Department of Defense (DOD).

Under federal law, veterans who suffer combat-related injuries and who are separated from the military are not supposed to be taxed on the one-time lump sum disability severance payment they receive from DOD.

Unfortunately, taxes on combat-related disability severance payments have nonetheless been withheld from qualifying veterans for a number of years due to the limitations of DOD’s automated payment system. Veterans are typically unaware that their benefits were improperly reduced as a result of DOD’s actions.

The Combat-Injured Veterans Tax Fairness Act of 2016, introduced by Boozman and Warner, corrects this problem by directing DOD to identify veterans who have been separated from service for combat-related injuries and received a severance payment. The bill instructs DOD to determine how much the combat-wounded veterans are owed and allow veterans who have been improperly taxed to recover the withheld amounts.

“It is absolutely wrong to deprive combat-injured veterans of their full severance upon separation. This has to be corrected. DOD has unjustly withheld taxes despite clearly-written federal law and a court opinion to the contrary. We have a responsibility to right this wrong and ensure that our nation’s wounded veterans receive the benefits they are rightfully due,” Boozman said.

“The intent of Congress, federal law and Department of Defense policy are all very clear: Service members separated as a result of combat-related injuries are not to have their severance pay taxed. It’s unbelievable that Congress has to act in order to ensure that the law is followed and that veterans who have already sacrificed so much receive every penny of their severance. Our legislation requires the Department of Defense to identify and notify individuals whose payments were reduced by improperly withheld taxes, and also extends the statute of limitations to ensure that those who were wronged long ago can still receive their full and proper payments,” Warner said.

The problem was originally identified by the National Veterans Legal Services Program (NVLSP), an independent, nonprofit veterans service organization that has served active duty military personnel and veterans since 1980.

“Most troubling is that we learned the government had known about this problem for decades yet continued to take this money from thousands of disabled veterans. After exploring all legal options, we concluded that the only large-scale fix to this problem was through legislation, and we are so grateful that Senator Boozman and Senator Warner are sponsoring this bill. The sad truth is that the government essentially stole $78 million dollars from disabled combat veterans because of an accounting problem it’s known about for years. To help undo the harm caused by this egregious oversight, we hope this legislation is passed quickly,” Tom Moore, attorney and manager of the Lawyers Serving Warriors project at NVLSP, said.

Moore worked on the issue with the pro-bono assistance of Frederick Eames, a partner at law firm Hunton & Williams.

NVLSP estimates that over 13,800 veterans potentially have been denied full severance pay as a result of wrongful taxation, including 165 veterans in Arkansas and 720 veterans in Virginia.

While introducing the bill, Boozman and Warner highlighted the financial burdens placed on two of their constituents—Brandon Davis of Greenwood, Arkansas and Leon Hill of Norfolk, Virginia.

“I was discharged from the Army due to combat-related injuries in 2005, a year after I was engaged in several enemy attacks during a deployment to Iraq. While I was going through the medical discharge process, I recall hearing that there was a computer problem related to disability severance payments, but no one ever explained what I needed to do to recover the money that was taken from me,” Davis said. “The government took eight thousand dollars from me without explaining that I could have recovered all of this money. This money would have helped me and my family as we adjusted to life after being discharged from the military. Because eleven years have passed since the money was taken, now I have no way to get it back unless this legislation is passed.”

“The government took more than $11,000 from my disability severance check after I was involuntarily separated from the Navy due to combat-related disabilities,” Hill said. “During my medical discharge proceedings, I received very little guidance. No one ever explained the tax issue to me. I didn't even know I had been shortchanged until Mr. Moore from NVLSP called me to explain the issue. Now I understand that there is no way to recover the money that was taken from me without this legislation.”

Estimates for affected veterans in other states available by request.

BACKGROUND ON THE NEED FOR THE LEGISLATION
One-time lump sum disability severance payments to active duty service members have been excluded from taxable income since a 1991 court ruling. This exclusion has been codified into the Department of Defense’s Financial Management Regulation, and also clarified in regulations used by the service branches. Due to limitations in its accounting system, DFAS knowingly took $78 million in “tax payments” from combat disabled service members. To recoup wrongfully withheld funds, veterans could have filed an amended tax return with the Internal Revenue Service, but most of the thousands of veterans affected are outside of the three-year period in which they can file an amended tax return. Only legislation passed by Congress and signed into law by the President can correct this injustice.

MEDIA CONTACTS
For NVLSP: Ami Neiberger-Miller, 703.887.4877, ami@steppingstoneLLC.com
For Senator Boozman's Office: Patrick Creamer, 202.224-4843, patrick_Creamer@boozman.senate.gov 
Boozman Statement on Meeting With Judge Garland. WASHINGTON –U.S. Senator John Boozman (R-AR) released the following statement after meeting with Supreme Court nominee Judge Merrick Garland: “Americans deserve a voice on the future di... Read More ...
1
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richard barwick

Iraq War Veterans  - 
 
GOVERNMENT WRONGFULLY DEDUCTS $78 MILLION FROM PAYMENTS TO DISABLED COMBAT VETERANS, SENATORS BOOZMAN AND WARNER INTRODUCE LEGISLATION TO RIGHT INJUSTICE
Boozman, Warner Seek to Protect Combat-Injured Veterans From Being Wrongfully Deprived of Full Severance
National Veterans Legal Services Program Informs Capitol Hill about Wrongful Withholding

WASHINGTON – U.S. Senators John Boozman (R-AR) and Mark Warner (D-VA) today introduced bipartisan legislation to ensure that veterans who suffer service-ending combat-related injuries are not taxed on the severance payment they receive from the Department of Defense (DOD).

Under federal law, veterans who suffer combat-related injuries and who are separated from the military are not supposed to be taxed on the one-time lump sum disability severance payment they receive from DOD.

Unfortunately, taxes on combat-related disability severance payments have nonetheless been withheld from qualifying veterans for a number of years due to the limitations of DOD’s automated payment system. Veterans are typically unaware that their benefits were improperly reduced as a result of DOD’s actions.

The Combat-Injured Veterans Tax Fairness Act of 2016, introduced by Boozman and Warner, corrects this problem by directing DOD to identify veterans who have been separated from service for combat-related injuries and received a severance payment. The bill instructs DOD to determine how much the combat-wounded veterans are owed and allow veterans who have been improperly taxed to recover the withheld amounts.

“It is absolutely wrong to deprive combat-injured veterans of their full severance upon separation. This has to be corrected. DOD has unjustly withheld taxes despite clearly-written federal law and a court opinion to the contrary. We have a responsibility to right this wrong and ensure that our nation’s wounded veterans receive the benefits they are rightfully due,” Boozman said.

“The intent of Congress, federal law and Department of Defense policy are all very clear: Service members separated as a result of combat-related injuries are not to have their severance pay taxed. It’s unbelievable that Congress has to act in order to ensure that the law is followed and that veterans who have already sacrificed so much receive every penny of their severance. Our legislation requires the Department of Defense to identify and notify individuals whose payments were reduced by improperly withheld taxes, and also extends the statute of limitations to ensure that those who were wronged long ago can still receive their full and proper payments,” Warner said.

The problem was originally identified by the National Veterans Legal Services Program (NVLSP), an independent, nonprofit veterans service organization that has served active duty military personnel and veterans since 1980.

“Most troubling is that we learned the government had known about this problem for decades yet continued to take this money from thousands of disabled veterans. After exploring all legal options, we concluded that the only large-scale fix to this problem was through legislation, and we are so grateful that Senator Boozman and Senator Warner are sponsoring this bill. The sad truth is that the government essentially stole $78 million dollars from disabled combat veterans because of an accounting problem it’s known about for years. To help undo the harm caused by this egregious oversight, we hope this legislation is passed quickly,” Tom Moore, attorney and manager of the Lawyers Serving Warriors project at NVLSP, said.

Moore worked on the issue with the pro-bono assistance of Frederick Eames, a partner at law firm Hunton & Williams.

NVLSP estimates that over 13,800 veterans potentially have been denied full severance pay as a result of wrongful taxation, including 165 veterans in Arkansas and 720 veterans in Virginia.

While introducing the bill, Boozman and Warner highlighted the financial burdens placed on two of their constituents—Brandon Davis of Greenwood, Arkansas and Leon Hill of Norfolk, Virginia.

“I was discharged from the Army due to combat-related injuries in 2005, a year after I was engaged in several enemy attacks during a deployment to Iraq. While I was going through the medical discharge process, I recall hearing that there was a computer problem related to disability severance payments, but no one ever explained what I needed to do to recover the money that was taken from me,” Davis said. “The government took eight thousand dollars from me without explaining that I could have recovered all of this money. This money would have helped me and my family as we adjusted to life after being discharged from the military. Because eleven years have passed since the money was taken, now I have no way to get it back unless this legislation is passed.”

“The government took more than $11,000 from my disability severance check after I was involuntarily separated from the Navy due to combat-related disabilities,” Hill said. “During my medical discharge proceedings, I received very little guidance. No one ever explained the tax issue to me. I didn't even know I had been shortchanged until Mr. Moore from NVLSP called me to explain the issue. Now I understand that there is no way to recover the money that was taken from me without this legislation.”

Estimates for affected veterans in other states available by request.

BACKGROUND ON THE NEED FOR THE LEGISLATION
One-time lump sum disability severance payments to active duty service members have been excluded from taxable income since a 1991 court ruling. This exclusion has been codified into the Department of Defense’s Financial Management Regulation, and also clarified in regulations used by the service branches. Due to limitations in its accounting system, DFAS knowingly took $78 million in “tax payments” from combat disabled service members. To recoup wrongfully withheld funds, veterans could have filed an amended tax return with the Internal Revenue Service, but most of the thousands of veterans affected are outside of the three-year period in which they can file an amended tax return. Only legislation passed by Congress and signed into law by the President can correct this injustice.

MEDIA CONTACTS
For NVLSP: Ami Neiberger-Miller, 703.887.4877, ami@steppingstoneLLC.com
For Senator Boozman's Office: Patrick Creamer, 202.224-4843, patrick_Creamer@boozman.senate.gov 
Boozman Statement on Meeting With Judge Garland. WASHINGTON –U.S. Senator John Boozman (R-AR) released the following statement after meeting with Supreme Court nominee Judge Merrick Garland: “Americans deserve a voice on the future di... Read More ...
3
Add a comment...

richard barwick

Discussion  - 
 
Are You An Atomic Veteran?

An Atomic Veteran is defined in legislation as a veteran who, as part of his or her military service:
Participated in an above-ground nuclear test, 1945 – 1962; or
Was part of the U.S. military occupation forces in/around Hiroshima/Nagasaki before 1946; or
Was held as a POW in or near Hiroshima or Nagasaki (certain cases).
Adverse Health Conditions You should Know About

Presumptive Cancers

If you have developed a “Presumptive Cancer,” which is presumed to be due to radiation exposure during your military service, all you have to do is verify that you are an Atomic Veteran to be eligible for disability compensation. Your service connection is established without considering the does received.

There are 21 presumptive cancers defined by law:

1. Leukemia (except chronic lymphocytic leukemia)
2. Cancer of the thyroid
3. Breast
4. Pharynx
5. Esophagus
6. Stomach
7. Small intestine
8. Pancreas
9. Bile ducts
10. Gall Bladder
11. Salivary glands
12. Urinary tract (kidneys, renal pelvis, ureter, urinary bladder and urethra)
13. Bone
14. Brain
15. Colon
16. Lung
17.Ovary
18. Lymphomas (except Hodgkin’s disease)
19. Multiple Myeloma
20. Primary Liver cancer (except if cirrhosis or hepatitis B is indicated)
21. Bronchio-Alveolar carcinoma (a rare lung cancer)

Nonpresumptive Cancers or Conditions

If you have developed a “nonpresumptive cancer or condition,” VA will consider additional factors to determine your entitlement to compensation based on radiation exposure. These include the amount of your radiation exposure and the elapsed time between exposure and the onset of the disease. An estimate is based on scientific principles, records maintained by the Department of Defense, and information you provide to VA and the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), which runs NTPR.

What Benefits May I Be Eligible For?

Atomic Veterans who have developed one of several specific cancers or nonmalignant conditions, may be eligible for compensation and/or free VA medical care. This compensation would be in the form of a partial or full service-connected disability allowance, including potential payments to your surviving spouse or children.

For more information contact the Radiation Exposure Compensation Program (RECA) at 800-729-7327.
1
Add a comment...

richard barwick

Discussion  - 
 
Are You An Atomic Veteran?

An Atomic Veteran is defined in legislation as a veteran who, as part of his or her military service:
Participated in an above-ground nuclear test, 1945 – 1962; or
Was part of the U.S. military occupation forces in/around Hiroshima/Nagasaki before 1946; or
Was held as a POW in or near Hiroshima or Nagasaki (certain cases).
Adverse Health Conditions You should Know About

Presumptive Cancers

If you have developed a “Presumptive Cancer,” which is presumed to be due to radiation exposure during your military service, all you have to do is verify that you are an Atomic Veteran to be eligible for disability compensation. Your service connection is established without considering the does received.

There are 21 presumptive cancers defined by law:

1. Leukemia (except chronic lymphocytic leukemia)
2. Cancer of the thyroid
3. Breast
4. Pharynx
5. Esophagus
6. Stomach
7. Small intestine
8. Pancreas
9. Bile ducts
10. Gall Bladder
11. Salivary glands
12. Urinary tract (kidneys, renal pelvis, ureter, urinary bladder and urethra)
13. Bone
14. Brain
15. Colon
16. Lung
17.Ovary
18. Lymphomas (except Hodgkin’s disease)
19. Multiple Myeloma
20. Primary Liver cancer (except if cirrhosis or hepatitis B is indicated)
21. Bronchio-Alveolar carcinoma (a rare lung cancer)

Nonpresumptive Cancers or Conditions

If you have developed a “nonpresumptive cancer or condition,” VA will consider additional factors to determine your entitlement to compensation based on radiation exposure. These include the amount of your radiation exposure and the elapsed time between exposure and the onset of the disease. An estimate is based on scientific principles, records maintained by the Department of Defense, and information you provide to VA and the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), which runs NTPR.

What Benefits May I Be Eligible For?

Atomic Veterans who have developed one of several specific cancers or nonmalignant conditions, may be eligible for compensation and/or free VA medical care. This compensation would be in the form of a partial or full service-connected disability allowance, including potential payments to your surviving spouse or children.

For more information contact the Radiation Exposure Compensation Program (RECA) at 800-729-7327.
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Forgotten Benefit
By Laura Martinez, USVCP Staff Writer
March 17, 2016


It can be a major undertaking to sift through all the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) benefits for the savviest of experts. One seemingly forgotten benefit is the Survivors’ and Dependents’ Educational Assistance (DEA) Program under Chapter 35.

Under this seldom used education program, family members of troops killed in action or those with 100% service-connected disabilities are able to obtain up to 45 months of education benefits in the form of a monthly stipend.

The DEA program provides education and training compensation to eligible dependents of veterans who are permanently and totally disabled due to a service-related condition or of veterans who died while on active duty or as a result of a service-related condition.

The amount allocated to a dependent can be up to a maximum of $1,021.00 a month for full-time students per rates as determined in October 2015.

The money from this program is intended to be used as supplemental income for dependents seeking degrees, certificate programs, apprenticeships, or on-the-job training.

The DEA program is separate from the Post-9/11 G.I. Bill. Dependents of service members who died in the line of duty or served adequate time to be able to transfer their G.I. Bill benefits can also be eligible for the DEA program, but only for up to 81 months of total full-time benefits. However, both programs may not be used concurrently.

Dependent children planning to apply for this benefit must fall between the ages of 18 and 26. As a dependent child, he/she will have up to age 26 to use the benefits. Spouses must use it within 10 years from the date VA finds one eligible or from the date of death of the Veteran.

The bill appears to be flexible in that children of fallen or disabled service members can be married, the money can be used for colleges or job training programs, and there are rates that vary and can apply to part-time or full-time schooling — unlike with the Post-9/11 G.I. Bill.

In order to apply, dependents must complete VA Form 22-5490 and submit it to the VA for consideration.
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