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Jaimal Yogis
Worked at Harper Collins
Attended Columbia University
Lives in San Francisco, CA.
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Jaimal Yogis

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Thanks Lion's Roar and Lilly Greenblatt for the great piece:

“Surfing is the perfect metaphor for samsara. You paddle, paddle, paddle, suffer, suffer, suffer, for this fleeting rush, one wave, but then it ends so quickly, and you’re sent back to the beach.”

We spoke with journalist and author Jaimal Yogis about his documentary "Saltwater Buddha," which tells his personal story of self-discovery through surfing and Zen practice.
http://www.lionsroar.com/saltwater-buddha/
For surfer, journalist, and Zen practitioner Jaimal Yogis, his documentary film, "Saltwater Buddha," has been the ultimate lesson in letting go.
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Jaimal Yogis

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The spiritual path shouldn't produce jealousy of those who appear more accomplished or sagely. The masters' point is that we are one fluid world and body. So the Buddha's enlightenment- and the awakening of any being - is our benefit. Just as our awakening, no matter how small, benefits others. #saltwaterbuddha  
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Get your tickets for the SF Premiere of SALTWATER BUDDHA. This event will sell out so grab em early!
https://www.facebook.com/events/1554973781473662/
San Franpsycho, Surf for Life, and the Saltwater Buddha crew are so happy to invite you to the SF premieres of two new films, SALTWATER BUDDHA (a feature documentary based on the best-selling book of the same title) and THANK YOU, SURF AGAIN (a 20-minute Surf for Life team documentary).
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Looking forward to co-teaching this retreat with Arnie Kozak.
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East Coast! #SaltwaterBuddha will have its New Jersey Premiere on Long Beach Island this Friday at the Lighthouse International Film Festival. Here's how to get tickets!
http://www.lighthousefilmfestival.org/
(We hear there are some decent breaks nearby too.)
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Since we couldn’t take the big budget approach we fell back on the good old-fashioned surf movie tradition: tell a story by having the dude on camera tell a story. Then, add waves and music.
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Jaimal Yogis

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It's hard to know what to do in the face of so many tragedies. Political channels can be good. We need meaningful gun control, a fair justice system and I applaud those working on these levels.

But I keep coming back to the basics too. We're social animals. We learn from watching others and mimic them, especially our parents, friends, and public figures. People - be they cops, criminals or ordinary people - who use violence against others because of difference didn't encounter enough good examples to mimic. They never learned that harm has a ripple effect that eventually harms them too. Furthermore, they weren't given tools to find peace in themselves and regulate anger - learned skills as much as math and reading are.

So first off, we have to have compassion for these people who have done horrible things. I'm not saying there shouldn't be justice, but justice should be motivated by compassion and forgiveness. We all have similar types of brains that soak up our surroundings and we could have easily been born into their circumstances. We could easily be full of anger and hate. We could be terribly confused and have just shot someone.

It's tempting to want to go rage and blame some person or group for all the shootings and that's natural. But I don't think this will help in the long run. The problem of violence has a root that we are all responsible for. The root, I think, is:

A.) That not enough of us have encountered tools to find peace and satisfaction inside.

B.) Because of that, we adhere to a false belief, through the way are own biology and brains trick us, that we are hardened, separate individuals who can find happiness by acquiring more stuff and popularity, which usually means exploiting others or beating others to have more. In other words, we buy into a belief that we are not part of the fluid body of life that includes black, white, and brown people, cops and not-cops, Muslim and non-Muslim, LGBTQ or not, urban and rural, animals and plants.


Talking about peace is good. Creating laws that bring about peace is excellent. But this is, in a certain sense, the window dressing on real peace. REAL PEACE, LASTING PEACE, COMES FROM THE MIND AND TAKES PRACTICE. DAILY TRAINING. It takes understanding the human mind enough to give it a regimen. I know there are many good ones out there, but meditation and yoga - and I include access to nature in these traditions - are the ones I'm most familiar with so I'll preach about those.

These practices are really simple and they work to build experiences of equanimity, contentment, compassion, and unity without any need for external input. We even have the research now to prove it. And without an experience of peace inside - which is a catalyst to an experience of the unified field of all life - there can be no peace out there.

If you haven't had this experience, this may sound nuts. But that's just the issue. Because if you have, you'll know exactly what I mean and know how important it is. Those of us who know what I mean, who have been fortunate enough to encounter these tools, have a responsibility. We have a responsibility to:

A.) Practice the tools ourselves and embody them as fully as we're able, which takes real commitment day after day. Our children and friends are mimicking us and we are mimicking them. Every one of our actions, every one of our breaths, every one of our words, is rippling through this sea and transforming it.

B.) We have a responsibility to share these peace-generating tools with others. The police should ALL have mandatory mindfulness training. Period. Children should ALL be taught in every grade how to find peace inside - and work with anger - through non-violent communication, mindfulness, arts etc. This doesn't need to be a religious thing at all. It's just basic understanding of what it means to have human biology and how to be happy.

Obviously, giving every human this experience is not going to happen overnight. But violence should be a motivator to practice these tools of peace and share these tools of peace.

As within, so without.
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l love your emphasis on taking our own responsibility. And putting learning /teaching peace tools into all curricula.
After the unholy incident at Holey Bakery, I too am guilty of dividing out the four or five men who have literally ruined much of Dhaka and perhaps obliterated the future of many lives in that country. It
Feels selfish to be glad to be home, to be safe. Yet in my own conversations I find it helps to not further divide amongst those who are angry, professional labelers filled with blame and the need to attack. My rolling eyes and grabbing stinging one liner retorts is fuel , not fodder. LISTENING is a tough practice but I notice it helps.
And it changes me, and that helps too.
Thanks Jaimal, yet again, for taking your time for making a difference out here💝

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Jaimal Yogis

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Thanks to #LionsRoar for starting things off with our little movie! If you join the Lion's Roar BuddhaFest online film festival (I think it's about $30) you can see a five other beautiful films and access original talks from Buddhist teachers like Sharon Salzberg, Tara Brach, Joan Halifax, and others.
http://www.lionsroar.com/the-lions-roar-and-buddhafest-online-film-festival-starts-today/
The Lion's Roar & BuddhaFest Online Film Festival starts today, and runs until July 24.
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Jaimal Yogis

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East Coast! Saltwater Buddha will have its New Jersey Premiere on Long Beach Island this Friday at the Lighthouse International Film Festival. Here's how to get tickets!

http://www.lighthousefilmfestival.org/

(We hear there are some decent breaks nearby too.)
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Honored to be one of six feature films Lion's Roar (formerly Shambhala Sun, the largest Buddhist Magazine in the world) has selected for BuddhaFest this year. Tickets here.
http://buddhafest.lionsroar.com/
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Thanks for sharing our story KorduroyTV! #saltwaterbuddha  
"The sea, once it casts its spell, holds one in it’s net of wonder forever” - Jacques Yves Cousteau
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Jaimal Yogis

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We'd love to see you for the Saltwater Buddha film premiere at the renowned San Diego Surf Film Festival. It has been quite a ride getting this project to the silver screen and we're stoked to celebrate at our first festival screening!
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People
In his circles
256 people
Have him in circles
141 people
Kristen Philipkoski's profile photo
Pandora Thomas's profile photo
Debbie Lopker's profile photo
Andrew Norton's profile photo
Alex Fang's profile photo
Kristen Philipkoski's profile photo
Hannah Park's profile photo
Jaco Pulco's profile photo
Reed Sherman's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Jaimal Yogis is an author, journalist, and screenwriter. His first book, a best-selling coming-of-age memoir called Saltwater Buddha, was praised by The Times of London, Publishers Weekly, and selected as one of E!’s Best Summer Reads as well as one of Headbutler.com’s 100 Essentials of all time. It has been translated into Spanish, Italian, German, and Finnish. A feature film based on the book is in production. Jaimal’s second book, The Fear Project, is a personal and scientific investigation into fear and courage. It was featured in Oprah, The Wall Street Journal, NPR, Forbes, Outside, and many others, and is currently being used in a number of schools as a contemporary way of teaching neuroscience and psychology. Currently, Jaimal is finishing a feature screenplay with producers Jon Silk (Gangster Squad) and Brad Fischer (Zodiac, Shutter Island, Black Swan) and working on a new memoir for Harper Collins. He is also the writer / producer for a forthcoming documentary, The Most Fearless. A graduate of Columbia Journalism School, Jaimal’s reporting has been featured in ESPN Magazine, The Washington Post, The Chicago Tribune, San Francisco Magazine, AFAR, The Surfers Journal, Sunset Magazine, and dozens of others. He is the recipient of the 2005 Leslie Rachel Sanders Award for Social Justice Reporting, a 2007 Maggie Award for Best Magazine Feature, and two Scripps Howard reporting scholarships. In 2010, The Common Wealth Club voted him “The New Face of San Francisco Media” for his popular writing in San Francisco Magazine. He lives in San Francisco with his wife, Amy, and their two sons.
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  • Harper Collins
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San Francisco, CA.
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Author of The Fear Project, Saltwater Buddha and soon a new Harper Collins novel. Upcoming films: Saltwater Buddha, City of Dragons, The Most Fearless
Education
  • Columbia University
    2005
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Male