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Scyap Inc
"Providing Hope and Tools to Succeed"
"Providing Hope and Tools to Succeed"
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WHO WE ARE
Saskatoon Community Youth Arts Programming (SCYAP) Inc, is a charitable and non-profit organization that meets the social, educational and economic needs of youth at risk through arts and cultural programming.

SCYAP was established in 2001 by Darrell B. Lechman, to offer street-level, youth-centered solutions to crime, unemployment and youth homelessness by using our youth's artistic interest and inclination as a tool to personal development and redirection towards a healthier, happier and more productive life.

One of SCYAP’s principal goals is to foster acceptance, integration and equality within the Saskatoon community by carrying out collaborative projects with different sectors, such as business, government, social and health services, and promoting inclusiveness and diverse cultural expression in classes, workshops and presentations.

SCYAP's programs give youth the opportunity to make a connection with the wider community and earn the recognition and confidence that comes with it.

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ABOUT SCYAP
Saskatoon Community Youth Arts Programming (SCYAP) Inc.
"Providing Hope and Tools to Succeed"

Mandate
Saskatoon Community Youth Arts Programming Inc. (SCYAP) is a charitable organization established in 2001 by Darrell Lechman to address the social, educational and economic needs of "at-risk" youth. SCYAP offers street-level, youth-oriented solutions to prevent youth crime, homelessness, and youth unemployment by utilizing our youth's artistic interest and inclination as the basis for personal development and redirection towards a healthier, happier and more productive life.

One of SCYAP’s principal goals is to foster acceptance, integration and equality within the Saskatoon community by carrying out collaborative projects with different sectors, such as business, government, social and health services, and promoting inclusiveness and diverse cultural expression in classes, workshops and presentations.

SCYAP’s objectives are to:
• Foster a constructive connection with the community among First Nations, Métis and ethnically diverse youth and youth at risk through community art activities.
• Implement a multi-dimensional crime-prevention strategy using art as the tool for engagement and participation.
• To encourage personal development and positive direction through art activities in a safe and
exciting youth friendly environment.
• Collaborate with social service and other community organizations to offer a single delivery window of programs to youth and youth at risk.
• To provide an open, welcoming environment where young people can receive mentorship, skills and positive direction from caring adults at no cost.
• To encourage personal development and education by providing youth with an opportunity to explore their creativity and experience the benefits derived from art- and culture-based activities.
• To encourage community integration and positive bonds between Saskatoon’s young people regardless of economic, social, cultural or racial differences.
• Provide a youth friendly environment where people can explore their creative drives, take risks and strengthen their cognitive skills through visual art.

Community Youth Arts Centre’s provide youth with an opportunity to learn new skills. They experience pride and satisfaction as their artwork improves and their self-confidence increases as they receive positive feedback and encouragement. The art projects involve extensive practice of skills and habits that education, employment and effective family life increasingly demand, as well as teamwork, persistent effort, self-monitoring, creative problem-solving and constructive dialogue and debate. In a recent U.S. employment survey of Fortune 500 companies, it was revealed that the top three most desirable qualities looked for in a potential new employee are experience, creativity and teamwork. These are all skills that are gained through art.
Within the first few weeks of entry into an Arts Centre, young artists show differences in their use of language as open questioning marks their talk as they critique one another’s work and make plans for the larger efforts of the group. They learn hypothetical reasoning, scenario building and strategy development. The art instruction and practice develops the skills young people need at school as well as providing positive reinforcement of their ability to succeed. In addition, the art leaders model the benefits of education and employment readiness and encourage the youth to pursue their educational interests.
According to research conducted at Stanford University and the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, of youth that were school leavers that frequented after school art centers, the majority tended to return to school. Those youth who were presently in school and started to frequent such after school and evening art centers showed a significant increase in their school marks and were twice as likely to win an award for academic achievement. As well, youth attending art centers were eight times more likely to win a community service award, four times more likely to participate in a math or science fair, 25% more likely to feel self-satisfied and 31% more likely to go on to higher education.
Recent studies have shown arts skill enhancement and instruction in the arts accelerates positive social, linguistic and cognitive development in young people. Visual art can be used as the key focus for the personal development and empowerment of youth, as well as in the redirection of “at-risk” youth to a healthy, happy and productive life. The positive development of our youth greatly influences the future moral and social fiber of the community. Arts and culture are not indulgences but rather mighty allies in the complex community-building process.
Community leaders, teachers and parents who hold high aspirations for students place considerable emphasis on what happens in non-school hours. Children and young people face large blocks of empty time during the hours they are not in school. These hours represent wasted and untapped resources for individual youth and their communities. 40-45% of students’ waking hours are not committed to school; nearly all of this time is spent either alone or with peers and not with adults. If you include weekends and summer hours, the percentage of “free time” increases to about 60%. This “free time” fails to contribute to positive personal development for our youth and has a significant negative impact on our city’s youth crime rate.
Subsidized sports-recreational programming has proven to be very successful with inner-city youth; however, this approach targets only a small percentage of a wide, diverse and rapidly growing population of young people. Similar programs focusing on art and culture are desperately needed to fill this gap making more complete the range of recreational/educational services and activities available to the City’s Aboriginal and “at-risk” youth.
SCYAP’s focus on art skills training addresses a strong, unmet need on the part of Saskatoon youth for arts programming. A recent Saskatoon District Health Teen Wellness Survey (120 youth ages 15-24) listed “art programs” as the number one choice of programs or classes that would increase their wellness. It was further mentioned in the Survey summary that “fine arts was something that you don’t get to learn much about in school” and that there was a “lack of art and music mentoring”.

Structure
SCYAP was founded in Saskatoon in 2001 by Darrell B Lechman and was incorporated under Saskatchewan’s Non-Profit Corporations Act on June 15, 2001 with the Registration Number 101022728. SCYAP gained registered charity status (870537412RR0001) through Canada Revenue Agency on October 27, 2005.

Governance
President: Darrell B Lechman

A volunteer board of community leaders governs SCYAP.

Chair: Valerie Schmidt, Entrepreneur, Small Business Owner
Retired Government of Saskatchewan Community Program Consultant

Kearney Healy, Lawyer
Saskatchewan Legal Aid Commission

Craig Podgursky, Regional Investigator
Correctional Service of Canada

Kim Lonsdale
Former Vice-President, Canada Youth Business Foundation
President, IMG Managing Group

Bev Dubois
Professional Consultant
Former City of Saskatoon Councilor


History, Accomplishments, Cultural Involvement and Current Activities

Founder and President Darrell Lechman’s gained information, knowledge and experience from working for over 14 years at Stony Mountain Penitentiary and as a Personal Development Coach for Aboriginal youth with Boys' & Girls Clubs of Edmonton led to his starting and running a group home for mentally and behaviourally challenged young man for Protengra Group Homes of Alberta and working for the City of Edmonton in youth programs. These experiences fertilized the seed that led him to start SCYAP. He said, “I believed that art could be used as a tool for personal development and redirection for those young people who were not necessarily interested in sports and had some artistic talent and interest.”

Further to that Darrell believed that “there comes a time in the life of most “at-risk” youth that a change or redirection can happen. It is at this time that the influences within their environment can and quite frequently will affect the direction in which the individual will choose. It is more than providing our youth with an influential environment that will furnish an opportunity for positive direction. It is getting them there and having them want to be there. With the Urban Canvas Project we have provided a tool that for these particular youth, is what attracts them and makes them what to be a part.

Art is the tool that holds these young people and creates the structure that allows for the building blocks of trust, belief, and confidence and leads them to higher self-esteem, self-worth and the desire to lead healthy, happy and productive lives. Quite simply, art is used as the focus to literally change lives.
We really have done this, the Urban Canvas Project is much more than an arts project, its personal development, crime prevention, crime intervention, redirection, direction, structure, camaraderie, team building, life skills, education, work experience, lifestyle alteration, community bonding, community building, community beautification, and that’s really only a partial list. We have seen participants who were living on the street with no direction whatsoever prior to the project now in a structured lifestyle, living in suites, paying bills, budgeting and contributing to society in a positive manner. These people now have direction, they want to work, or go to school. They have pride in themselves and in their community.

We have seen participants, who prior to the project received their only recognition through graffiti vandalism or other crime have now put their interest, effort and dollars into positive art works on canvas, Masonite and appropriate venues. But its goes way deeper than that, it’s a total psychological alteration.

They now believe in themselves and no longer feel the need for negative recognition. They are proud of themselves and of the artwork that they now create. They have been recognized as artists by their community, their peers, gallery artists they’ve met, and most importantly by themselves. This is major; it is also contagious, as these young people will now influence others in a positive manner, not only their children and family, but friends, relatives and the community as a whole.

SCYAP has touched lives, beautified our community, developed numerous community connections, partnerships, and supporters and gained National and Local recognition through media, networking and strong community service.

SCYAP initiated its activities in 2001 with the first Urban Canvas Project, intensive 39-week visual arts, personal development and employment readiness program for "youth at risk". Historically, 70% of participants have been First Nations and Métis.

Since moving into a downtown storefront location in 2002, SCYAP has expanded its activities to include; a formal public art gallery; a comprehensive multi-venue drop-in art program; specialized art workshops; a cultural connections program; art & culture exhibitions; outreach initiatives carried out in partnership with community-based organizations, schools, and First Nation communities; employment skills training, job readiness & employment search assistance, crisis intervention and life coaching; a social enterprise including commercial signage, graphic design murals and artistic decoration and corporate gifts.

SCYAP is now regarded as a community resource for information on:
• Using art as a tool for personal development & re-direction
• Art as a therapeutic device to help individuals with mental development challenges
• Aboriginal youth engagement
• the use of visual arts as a method of crime prevention and intervention
• community graffiti consultants
• Aboriginal visual arts

While SCYAP provides training to young people with visual arts interest, it also presents exhibitions in its gallery and off-site at festivals and community events. It engages emerging and professional artists, many of them Indigenous, in public art projects such as murals, design and the decoration of street furniture. It is the only visual arts organization in Saskatchewan whose programs fall squarely into the new form of community art practice directly involving young people as a way of integrating them into the larger society while youth community development. The genre it promulgates has been called “youth art”, with an emphasis on legitimizing graffiti-styled art and a marked sympathy for both traditional and contemporary forms of Indigenous art. Its primary commitment within the visual arts discipline is to emerging artists, many of them First Nations and Métis, with professional artists playing a mentorship role.

The Saskatoon Community Youth Arts Programming Inc. (SCYAP) is based in the inner city of Saskatoon but has served communities throughout Saskatchewan. A high proportion (70%) of its program participants are youth from First Nations, Métis and ethnically diverse communities.

In 2016, SCYAP celebrated its 15th anniversary. Since 2001, it has grown from a single-program not-for-profit offering the Urban Canvas Project to a registered charity that has won a national award and advised academics, governments and agencies on best practices for engaging indigenous youth and reintegrating marginalized youth. It remains on the cutting edge of service to youth through ongoing assessment and innovation, learning from the clients themselves and remaining in close touch with issues in the community. It now functions as a leader, locally and nationally, in the use of visual arts as a vehicle for personal development and rehabilitation for children and youth at risk.
SCYAP’s philosophy, which is that the beneficial, youth-oriented use of artistic self-expression coupled with an influential personal development coach can engender and enhance positive socialization and in some cases heal socially disadvantaged individuals. There are multiple benefits for the community in terms of crime prevention and social integration. We are committed not only to carrying out the programs but to performing outreach to inform the larger community about the potential of this approach.
SCYAP has worked with the City of Saskatoon, many institutions and private businesses on public art projects that function as both hands-on practical learning situations for program participants and employment opportunities for young artists. This is a key innovative element in its approach, creating durable, beneficial links between the larger community and its participants. It allows them to see themselves not as outcasts and threats to the social order, but as citizens who can make a unique contribution.

In 2007, SCYAP received the CIBC – Eva’s Initiative Award, a national award for innovative work with youth at risk.

Director and Founder Darrell Lechman has been sought out by the federal Department of Canadian Heritage, the Laidlaw Foundation, and McMaster, McGill and York Universities for consultation on best practices for engaging youth. This information was used in crafting federal funding policy and contributing to a university textbook on the subject.

The authors of Marginality and Condemnation: Critical Criminology in Canadian Society, a published textbook used in major universities across North America, have cited SCYAP's Urban Canvas Project philosophy and practices as an inspiration for the textbook. SCYAP youth also provided artwork for the cover.

Researchers from Ontario’s Ministry of culture have contacted Darrell regarding best practices and strategies in engaging youth in arts, sports and leadership, for use in a major provincial report titled Routes of Violence Review.

Cities across Canada, as well as the Twin Cities of Minneapolis-St. Paul, have contacted Darrell about developing a program like the Urban Canvas Project to link youth to community economic development in their communities.

There have been well over 200 print media features on SCYAP’s programming in such publications as MacLean's Magazine, The Times of London, Calgary Herald, Regina Leader-Post, Saskatoon Star Phoenix and many of the Canadian Press affiliates across the country.

SCYAP's television coverage includes over 200 features totalling in excess of 250 minutes of air time. CBC, CTV, Global, CFCQ, and Shaw have all covered the project. CBC National featured a 12-minute special on “Canada Now” that aired nationwide. As well, the project has garnered significant radio coverage from CKOM, Hot 93, 102FM, Magic 98, CJWW and C95, as well as a feature on CBC Radio 1.


Programming Overview

Art Ventures
Each year, SCYAP sees an increase in requests to develop and conduct custom workshops for other community base organizations. We offer workshops that enhance and augment the curriculum of these organizations, using art to engage these children and youth, helping them grow and take positive steps forward in their lives. Some individuals see these workshops as opportunities to enhance their artistic abilities, exercise and develop areas of critical thinking, and engage in art as a therapeutic exercise. As a result, we have established new relationships with these organizations and have become the leading holistic art workshop organization in Saskatchewan.

A large section of the groups are of aboriginal heritage, while others are interested in more cultural components to the workshops. SCYAP has developed new and modified existing workshops, incorporating cultural components, offering and conducting these workshops to existing and new community based organizations. This also allows our Art Leadersthrough their own experiences, struggles and journey’s, to engage young people through art, helping them realize a positive life path, to develop new and existing relationships in the community, while enhancing their teaching, preparation and work skills.

Through the workshops we create for these other social organizations, we can positively influence and affect people and their families throughout Saskatchewan. Our focus is to provide a safe and welcoming environment that encourages personal development and education by giving participants of all ages the opportunity to explore their creativity and experience the benefits derived from art- and culture-based activities. With this program, SCYAP has become an integral part in the path forward for thousands of participants. These organizations recognize that SCYAP engages individuals through art, giving them alternatives to life on the street, away from a life with illegal substances, and allowing them the opportunity to lead a healthy, positive lifestyle.

A focus of the activities is themes based on overcoming violence and empowering youth with a sense of community and belonging, instilling attitudes and behaviors that reduce barriers to their progress and future participation in society. The participants will use arts creation as a framework for social, cognitive and leadership development.

The workshops will give these young people the necessary attributes, skills and experiences to help them to stay in school and away from the negative street culture and will give youth a more confident and positive outlook on their future pathway into young adulthood and beyond.


After School and Weekend Art Drop-in
• To provide an open, welcoming environment where young people can receive mentorship, skills and positive direction from caring adults
• To encourage personal development and education by providing youth with an opportunity to explore their creativity and experience the benefits derived from art- and culture-based activities
• To encourage community integration and positive bonds between Saskatoon’s young people regardless of economic, social, cultural or racial differences

SCYAP has been holding after-school and drop-in visual arts classes at its downtown centre since 2002. The drop-in and after schoolprogramis intended to work against social marginalization, gang involvement, crime and substance abuse among Saskatoon’s children and youth, especially First Nations, Métis, diverse ethnic and street-involved young people. The program provides a safe environment and a constructive, holistic approach that can build self-confidence, social and cognitive skills and promote a healthy interaction between social groups and communities.People of all ages are welcome to participate.

The sessions are held in a fully equipped studio with large tables, art supplies and a clean-up area. Weekday activities can include instruction in particular art techniques, group projects, and individual projects. Some participants join in group projects in collage, painting, making puppets or sculpture. Others are aspiring artists who lack the space, resources and guidance to carry out their own projects. SCYAP has been enhancing and expanding our drop-in program by including cultural art activities and projects. SCYAP has three aboriginal art leaders that design and help to conduct these activities.

Over time we have formed and strengthened partnerships with the school boards to offer the program in the core neighborhood community schools and with numerous social service organizations to run regular workshops designed for clients with special needs. Our activities continue to expand to numerous venues and our Aboriginal Arts Leaders have expanded the activities to focus on more cultural themes and ideas.

At SCYAP’s Downtown Drop-In Centre, weekend workshops are periodically conducted on a particular theme all with the basis of building self-confidence and wellness. Examples of such workshops include Mask making, cartooning and Indigenous art and multicultural crafts, and are lead by Professional artists. Informal surveys indicate that many parents prefer a structured activity that will encourage their children and youth to learn new skills.

One of SCYAP’s principal goals is to foster acceptance, integration and equality within the Saskatoon community by carrying out collaborative projects with different sectors, such as business, government, social and health services, and promoting diverse cultural expression in classes, workshops and presentations. With this in mind, SCYAP will continue to offer regularly scheduled, free art programming and activities at our downtown location, as well as over 20 Community Based Organizations and more than 15 Community Schools. Activities are scheduled for outside school hours, for inner-city children, youth and community groups.

Cultural Connections/Traditions
The project’s overall objective is to provide youth with workshops and activities, centered in both Indigenous and their own culture and community. Participants will strengthen their sense of self on personal and social levels, strengthen their critical thinking ability, and become engaged in the community around them.
SCYAP works with a number of schools and education organizations that look for additional programming that aids in the social and mental development of their youth.
SCYAP also works with community based organizations for newcomers to provide a safe environment where people new to Canada can learn Canadian culture and language while developing relationships and forming a bond to their new community.

Some of our targets for this project:
• Engage urban youth and other stakeholders in planning, development and delivery of programs and services to reduce barriers to the development of these youth.
• Deliver a consistent, structured program to youth in their own environment, with the involvement of mentors and other members from the community.
• Showcase visual art and storytelling practices through experienced Art Leaders. These practices are both traditional and contemporary, producing a revitalization of the art forms.
• Preservation and revitalization of cultural components in relation to the above mentioned initiatives and projects.
• Engage participants in collaborative public art activities with the larger community increasing their sense of involvement and the feeling of having a place within their communities.
• Promote a pro-active, creative and participatory approach to activities; fostering decision-making, negotiation and verbal presentation skills.


Summer Art in the Park
Along with following the goals of SCYAP, this program is meant to bring art and cognitive developing opportunities to children and youth during summer months when schools are not operating. Together with our Community After School and Drop In Programs SCYAP aims to offer a complete system to help the participants and community in which we live.

All community members regardless of age are encouraged to take an active role in a positive activity based program. SCYAP's young artists, who act as Art Leaders, are given the opportunity to develop teaching skills and deepen their understanding of our community, as well as earn a wage. Art activities allow participants to engage in stimulating fun activities that encourage a more positive attitude to the community. Bringing the art to the park will encourage people to enjoy the community around them, while learning art skills and techniques. These art activities will also help to promote greater awareness of local culture among all community members.

Urban Canvas
The Urban Canvas Project (UCP) is a 39-week program that seeks to help distressed and marginalized youth to build on a natural interest and ability in visual arts, while helping them also acquire marketable skills and tools in an effort to either find jobs or pursue further education. In some cases, SCYAP’s program is seen as a last resort for youth who have been in trouble with the justice system or encountered serious barriers (personal, family, or social reasons), to education. The Urban Canvas Project is unique in the province in providing rigorous, structured training that is intensive enough and long enough to make a lasting impact on participants, and therefore on the community in which they live and work.

The most important factor is to provide participants with intensive individual support and coaching, while encouraging them to produce work and participate in a sustained way. The principal long-term benefit of this constructive experience is to increase their self-esteem, confidence, and assertiveness, and to change their self-image from that of marginalized outcasts to that of respected, productive members of the community.

SCYAP is the only social service organization in the city to provide training in visual and graphic art, drawing on both mainstream and Aboriginal themes and styles. It also allows participants a hands-on experience that allows them to interact with community partners and employers, to acquire direct working experience in graphic arts, and to build a successful portfolio.

Along with technical training, UCP provides workshops on personal and professional development, life skills, health and wellness, and entrepreneurship. SCYAP has also been working with the literacy community and its own graduates to develop strategies for functional and job literacy acquisition.

The Urban Canvas Project is unique in two ways: It has a track record of making a successful connection with marginalized youth and changing their attitudes towards the community and themselves; and it involves its participants directly with community organizations in an interactive working relationship that brings them recognition, acceptance and reinforcement of pro-social attitudes.

Project participants are selected from among unemployed at-risk youth aged 16 to 30. Many are of First Nations, Métis or other diverse ethnic origins. No distinction is made as to status or gender. These young people may have dropped out of school, become involved in gangs, been in trouble with the law, or had addiction or emotional problems. Their common characteristics are having a troubled background, difficulty in finding employment, an interest in visual art, and a desire to change their life. Often this desire is felt when they have been out of school for some time, finding themselves excluded from the larger community, or when they have already been involved with the correctional system. Some of the individuals are sometimes considered “hopeless cases” in our society.



Beautifying Communities

Traffic Control Cabinets
The young artists from Saskatoon Community Youth Arts Program have created some cultural history for downtown Saskatoon with their exciting designs on many traffic control boxes. The exquisitely painted boxes can be viewed throughout our downtown and depict the history of our city and province. Design themes range from modes of transportation, i.e. old trolley streetcars to modern buses, to famous Saskatoon buildings, people and landmarks, i.e., Gordie Howe, Joni Mitchel, the Delta Bessborough and the Victoria Bridge. Each cabinet has its own unique design and tells its own story in pictures.

Murals
SCYAP has become the more proficient and prominent mural organization in Saskatoon, with over 500 indoor and outdoor murals. Whether it is on an outside wall, such as the St. Paul’s Hospital mural, or indoors, such as the murals in many Saskatoon public libraries, the SCYAP mural crew can tackle requests, big or small. Once the mural has been painted, SCYAP is utilizing a special coating to help tackle the illegal graffiti.

Graffiti Restoration
SCYAP also specializes in restoring artwork that has been vandalized, bringing back the beautiful artwork. SCYAP has also been contracted to create unique paintings to help deter the spread the illegal graffiti, while helping to beautify Saskatoon. We are also able to color match any wall to restore a seamless colored wall, whether that be plain cement or brick.

Consultations
SCYAP has been asked to consult on various graffiti initiatives. Whether it is local community association, or public educational institutions, SCYAP staff can bring a wealth of information to help cleanup or alleviate illegal graffiti. From mural proposals, to how best to tackle “tagging” in a community, SCYAP will be able offer guidance to a solution that will help stem the activities and also beautify our city.



Program Sustainability
SCYAP has learned to be versatile and progressive in the search for program funding opportunities. We recognize that funding avenues may not be there in the future, and we also look for alternative funding opportunities to expand current programs, while also creating new ones. Over the past couple years,

SCYAP has applied for funding from the following organizations:
• Government of Saskatchewan
• Government of Canada
• City of Saskatoon
• Saskatoon Community Foundation
• SaskCulture
• Saskatoon Collaborative Funding Partnership
• Community Initiatives Fund
• Saskatchewan Arts Board
• Saskatoon Health Region
• Student Summer Works - Government of Saskatchewan
• Gabriel Dumont Institute
• Canadian Women’s Foundation
• Catherine Donnelly Foundation
• Home Depot Canada Foundation
• Northridge Developments
• ArtsVest
• SIGA
• SaskTel
• Tides Canada Foundation
• McLean Foundation
• Inspirit Foundation
• McConnell Foundation
• Paterson Foundation
• BHP Billiton
• Cameco
• PotashCorp
• Point 2
• Rio Tinto Alcan Canada Fund
• Dakota Dunes Community Development Corporation
• Affinity Credit Union
• Royal Bank After School Grants Project
• Imperial Oil Community Investment
• Connexus


Just for your information here are a few exciting little known facts about SCYAP
• Due to SCYAP’s well known success, SCYAP's Director and Founder Darrell Lechman was recently sought out by the Government of Canada’s Department of Heritage, the Laidlaw Foundation, McMaster, McGill and York Universities for consultation on “best practices” for youth engagement. Darrell’s information was to be used in Policy making for granting of funds through the Federal Government as well as for content in a textbook for the above-mentioned universities.

• As well researchers from the Ministry of Culture for the Province of Ontario contacted Darrell for “Best Practices and strategies in engaging youth in Arts, sports and Leadership” This to be used in a major Ontario governmental report called “Routes of Violence Review”

• Representatives from cities across Canada, as well as from the Twin Cities of Minneapolis - St. Paul, have also contacted Darrell to learn about developing a project such as SCYAP’s Urban Canvas and linking youth to community economic development.

• There have been well over 200 published features on SCYAP Programming. Some of the publications who have covered SCYAP programming include MacLean's News Magazine, London Times, Calgary Herald, Regina Leader Post, Saskatoon Star Phoenix and many of the Canadian press associated newspapers across the country.

• Along similar lines, SCYAP is part of a platform for higher education as the authors of a University Textbook called "Marginality and Condemnation: Critical Criminology in Canadian Society", (a recently published textbook that is used in the curriculum of major Universities across North America) have stated that SCYAP's Urban Canvas project philosophy and practices were inspiration for the book and utilized in the writing of. SCYAP youth also provided the painting for the Textbook Cover.

• In 2005 the City of Saskatoon and CTV Television selected Darrell as one of Saskatoon’s “100 People 100 Reasons”. A one-time city centennial honour given to only one hundred people who have made Saskatoon a better place to live.

• In 2006 the government of Saskatchewan honoured Darrell for his work with SCYAP by presenting him with the Saskatchewan Centennial Medal, which recognizes individuals who have made significant contributions to society and honours outstanding achievements.

• Darrell was sought out by the Canadian Urban Institute in Toronto to join Giles Bugailiskis (chief advisor to Winnipeg City Council), Kevin Stolarick (Research Director of the Martin Prosperity Institute) and Peter Stoicheff (President of the University of Saskatchewan) to form a four person advisory Board for a major initiative that involves a proposed Cultural Plan for the City of Saskatoon.

• SCYAP has also been recognized with the Lieutenant Governors Art Award for innovation in the Arts.

• SCYAP's extensive television coverage includes over 200 features totalling in excess of over 200 minutes of “air time”. CBC, CTV, Global, CFCQ, and Shaw have all covered the project as well as CBC National featured a 12-minute special on “Canada Now” which aired Nationwide. As well the project garnered significant radio coverage, CKOM, Hot 93, 102FM, Magic 98, CJWW, C95, and features on CBC National Radio 1 including a 12-minute national special.

• SCYAP through its multitude of programs has worked with well over 15000 young people since 2001.

• SCYAP has produced over 100 art exhibitions, painted over 50 major murals and has created well over 1000 pieces of public art since 2002

• SCYAP's Corporate Gift division which gives paid employment opportunities to past Urban Canvas youth has produced products for many agencies, businesses and organizations and amongst the products created were the Player of the Game Awards for the 2010 World Junior Hockey Championships and over 1300 gifts for the 2007 Juno Awards.

• In 2007, SCYAP received the CIBC – Eva’s Award, a national award for innovative work with youth at risk.


Darrell B. Lechman
President/ Founder SCYAP Inc.
Biography


Darrell created and founded Saskatoon Community Youth Arts Programming Inc. (SCYAP) in June 2001. His experience working as a personal development coach for Aboriginal youth, in combination with his admiration for the unbridled talent of graffiti artists, pushed him to answer his own questions: “How can we give these young, at-risk Aboriginal youth, and the underprivileged an opportunity to have equal access to arts training? How can we take these talented graffiti vandals and have them re-channel their talent to positive initiatives and mainstream galleries?” His answer was the creation of SCYAP.
Saskatoon Community Youth Arts Programming Inc. (SCYAP) is a not-for-profit organization established to address the social, educational and economic needs of youth and "at-risk" youth. SCYAP offers street-level, youth-oriented solutions to prevent youth crime and youth unemployment and utilizes our youth's artistic interest and inclination as the basis for personal development and redirection towards a healthier, happier and more productive life. Through SCYAP art & culture programming Darrell has been able to successfully link youth with community economic development
Darrell has over 30 years experience in youth program development and small business management. A few of his many experiences include developing and coordinating a group home for special needs youth with behavioural issues for Protega Homes of Edmonton, coordinating youth programs for the City of Edmonton, and coaching youth personal development with the Boy’s & Girl’s Club of Edmonton. Darrell has also been a Youth Skills Instructor with Winnipeg School Division #1, and was a facilitator/instructor with Frank Olson’s internationally recognized Street Proofing Our Kids (S.P.O.K. Inc) program in Vancouver. Darrell also brings 14 years of front line work experience in Federal Corrections at Stony Mountain Penitentiary. During that time he was involved in security, case management, recreation, and was a member of the Dog Unit, and the Emergency Response Team.
Darrell has given numerous presentations, lectures and Keynotes for various companies and schools including TEDX, Communicating Power Inc. of Edmonton, Saskatoon Police Service, SIIT, Saskatoon Tribal Council, Saskatoon Public School Division, Frontier College, Saskatoon Health Region, Ignite Art Conference – Toronto, Green Economic Conference – Indigenous Peoples Program, Tags Anti- Graffiti National Conference, and the University of Saskatchewan.
Due to SCYAP’s well-known success, the Government of Canada’s Department of Heritage, the Laidlaw Foundation, McMaster, McGill and York Universities recently sought Darrell out for consultation on “best practices” for youth engagement. Darrell’s information was used in Policy making for granting of funds through the Federal Government as well as for content in a textbook for the above-mentioned universities. In addition to, researchers from the Ministry of Culture for the Province of Ontario contacted SCYAP for “Best Practices and strategies in engaging youth in Arts, sports and Leadership” This to be used in a major Ontario governmental report called “Routes of Violence Review”. As well representatives from cities across Canada, as well as from the Twin Cities of Minneapolis - St. Paul in Minnesota USA, have contacted Darrell to learn about developing a project such as SCYAP’s Urban Canvas and linking youth to community economic development.
In 2005 the government of Saskatchewan honoured Darrell for his work with SCYAP by presenting him with the Saskatchewan Centennial Medal, which recognizes individuals who have made significant contributions to society and honours outstanding achievements.
In 2006 The City of Saskatoon and CTV Television selected Darrell as one of Saskatoon’s “100 People 100 Reasons”. A city centennial honour given to one hundred people who have made Saskatoon a better place to live.
Darrell was recently asked by the Canadian Urban Institute in Toronto to join Giles Bugailiskis (chief advisor to Winnipeg City Council), Kevin Stolarick (Research Director of the Martin Prosperity Institute) and Peter Stoicheff (Dean of Humanities and Fine Arts at the University of Saskatchewan) to form a four person advisory Board for a major initiative that involves a proposed Cultural Plan for the City of Saskatoon.
SCYAP has also been recognized with the Lieutenant Governors Art Award for innovation in the Arts, and the National EVA Award for innovative programming for the homeless.
Since its establishment in 2001 SCYAP projects have reached over 25000 youth. SCYAP projects have resulted in hundreds of public art installations and over 60 major murals including murals at Circle & Eight Mall, RUH Hospital, Cameco, Superstore, White Buffalo Youth Lodge, City Park Collegiate, Saskatoon Indian Métis Friendship Centre and St. Paul’s Hospital. SCYAP has also provided the City of Saskatoon with no less than 400 commissioned public art pieces, and staged at least 60 public Art Exhibitions at various venues including the Mendel Gallery, Wanuskewin Heritage Gallery and Toronto Public Library. As well SCYAP youth have administered art workshops for numerous organizations and agencies including the Saskatoon Public and Catholic School Divisions, Saskatoon Zoological Society, City of Saskatoon Leisure Services and the Cru Teen Wellness Centre. SCYAP also has an After School & Weekends Art Drop in Centre located in numerous venues across the city.
Our focus of re-direction through art has not only provided direction for young people, touched lives, and lead to beautification of our communities, but also literally saved lives.
Our Urban Canvas Commercial Art Training Project for “at-risk” youth continues to be an amazing success, tangible results indicate that 50% of the youth that have completed our programs have found post project employment, and 40% have returned to formal education (no less than 40 have went on to College or University). The intangible affects that the youth receive from our programs are truly amazing, a plethora of benefits that extend much further than commercial art training and job readiness, confidence, pride, self-esteem, self worth, leadership and the feeling of ownership and belonging within their community are just a few.
As far as visibility, SCYAP and its programs present unequalled positive media and community exposure. SCYAP has already gained extensive media acclaim through over 300 minutes of local and national television news video and no less than 200 published print features, including MacLean’s News Magazine, the London Free Press, Calgary Herald, Globe & Mail, Mendel Art Gallery Folio, Child Find Saskatchewan, Life in the City, Eagle Feather News, Planet S Magazine, the Canadian press news service, and numerous features in the Saskatoon Star Phoenix, CARFAC (Canadian Artists Representation) News, Regina Leader Post, and Saskatoon Sun newspapers.

Darrell has been involved in numerous Saskatoon community initiatives including the following:

Boards and Committees:

* Saskatoon Housing First Task Force
*CIBC - National EVA Awards Review/Adjudication Committee – Saskatchewan Representative
*Saskatoon Health Region Community Grants Adjudication Committee
*RIC Aboriginal Employment Strategy Steering Committee
*National Learning Committee for Youth Homelessness – Saskatchewan Representative
*City of Saskatoon Community Support Officers Advisory Committee
*Community University Institute for Social Research Review Committee
*Aboriginal Human Resource Council Workforce Connex Advisory Committee
*People for Action against Homelessness
*Premiers Project Hope
*Saskatoon Communities for Children
*Saskatoon Mediation Service’s Consultation Committee
*STC Urban First Nations Youth Detox Centres
*Caswell Community Association
*Caswell Art in Park Committee
*Canadian University Institute for Social Research
*Injection Drug Use Stakeholders Committee
*U of S Health Sciences Interdisciplinary Population Health Project Preceptor/Mentor
*Families against Meth
*Flicks Film Festival Stakeholders
*Saskatchewan Literacy Network
*CNYC Advisory Committee for the Rebuild
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