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Nick Wernham
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Nick Wernham

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Nice kill, guys!

Nick Wernham

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I think that you guys are right to say that people are being a bit hasty in crowning Masai Ujiri "The Masaiah", but that he is still very good. His body of work needs to be a bit more substantial before we regard him as "great". I do like his process to this point, but it's hard for a GM's entire process to be revealed in under two years with a club.

I would argue though that the Raptors would not merely be "in the playoff conversation" if they were in the West. I think they'd be an obvious playoff team. I'd say they'd still be in the conversation for home court advantage in the West.

Furthermore, while the Raptors have had an easy schedule to this point they actually have the easiest schedule the rest of the way as well. The reason? They are the only team in the Eastern Conference that does not have to play the Toronto Raptors.

Nick Wernham

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Run The Jewels shout out! Album of the Year!

Nick Wernham

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Oh. I wanted to add that I really like the format. Nice work, fellas!

Nick Wernham

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For me, two of the most interesting things when analyzing a sport have to be examining:

1) Which qualities players are purported to have that are true "repeatable skills' and which patterns of success involve variables outside of their control.
2) Which of these repeatable skills can be trained at all at an advanced stage of development (and by the time an athlete reaches the NBA they are at an advanced stage), to what extent can that development occur and what success rate is there in developing these skills.

This video does a wonderful job of examining the capacity for NBA players to improve their abilities on the court. Nice work!

Nick Wernham

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In all seriousness, I'd love to see some videos where you guys explain the meaning behind and importance of different types of numbers. What does true shooting percentage actually mean? How does it address some of the problems with conventional shooting percentage numbers (FG%, 3FG%, FT%) as metrics of performance? What issues are there with it? Is the data which people are working with good enough or what other data could be gathered to improve these metrics? I really enjoy that kind of analysis. Thanks again, fellas and keep up the good work!
Have him in circles
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Nick Wernham

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Great summary, Will. I'm honestly not sure how I feel about this strategy, but I do feel better informed about what tanking is, what the alternatives are the likelihood of the strategy working. Nice job!

Nick Wernham

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Man, I've been sleeping on Raef! What a stud.

Also, been sleeping on your videos, fellas. Looking forward to catching up with the ones I've missed over the past couple of weeks.

Nick Wernham

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NIce one, Josh. I'd heard a lot of arguments both ways from various talking heads, but nothing so articulate that gave me any new information. Lots of stuff about he CBA that I didn't understand until now. I'll have to do some more reading about it.

Nick Wernham

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Damn! I am only fifteen minutes in and this is already my favourite video yet. I hate the "rings" narrative so much. I firmly believe that a player can win zero championships and be the best player of their era by a mile. The best example of this I can think of is Barry Bonds in baseball. Understand that I am not a Barry Bonds fan. Aside from believing him to be a cheater I find him boorish and rude.

Allegedly he started doing steroids during the off season between the 1998 and 1999 seasons. At that point he was already far and away the greatest player of his era and one of the ten greatest outfielders of all time (on the edge of the top five actually). He had more of Bill James' Win Shares in the 1990s, Craig Biggio was second and Greg Maddux was tenth. There was a bigger gap between Bonds and Biggio than there was between Biggio and Maddux. It wasn't close. We were already seeing one of the greatest players to ever live. He hit for power, he hit for average, he drew walks, he played a sparkling left field, he ran the bases as well as anybody short of Rickey Henderson and he never won a championship. Then he did steroids and put together what is easily the greatest run of seasons of all time. Three of the five greatest offensive seasons of all time belong to Barry Bonds. He still never won a championship.

Does the fact that Bonds never won a ring preclude him from being one of the three greatest hitters of all time (alongside Babe Ruth and Ted WIlliams)? No. It doesn't. Heck, I think that in baseball you can be one of the greatest players of your era and never even make it to the postseason. Ted Williams' Re Sox only finished first in the AL to qualify for the World Series once. They only finished second five other times and the guy played from 1939 to 1960 in an eight team American League.

In basketball where over half of the teams make the playoffs you couldn't say something like this, but I would contend that LeBron was the greatest player in the league during his Cleveland years championships or not. And, hypothetically, an incredible player with amazing efficiency and an immense usage rate who passed the eye test as the best player in every way were on a terribly coached team otherwise comprised of guys who are nowhere close to NBA-level talents and they finished last every year then that guy is still the greatest player in basketball.

Nick Wernham

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Good research, Will. This is a question I'd been wondering about.

Nick Wernham

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Fuck Brooklyn!

It's interesting that they did so poorly in terms of defensive above-the-break three point field goal percentage given that they were going with this all switching lineup. Conceptually you'd think that defense would do a good job against that type of shot.

Just to be clear, is an all switching defense one where the defenders switch every time the opposing offense invites them to regardless of matchups?
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Have him in circles
57 people
Karin Hinze's profile photo
Ivan Barragan's profile photo
Todd O'Day's profile photo
Thomas Wischhoefer (Elapsed)'s profile photo
Jared Sargent's profile photo
Matthew Brown's profile photo
Frank Balistreri's profile photo
Manuel Reynolds's profile photo
Jason Hinze's profile photo
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  • Wernham Entertainment
    C.E.O., 2010 - present
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I am a director based in Toronto. I like cinema, music and baseball.
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