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Chandran Seshagiri
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Has anyone else noticed that Google Play Newsstand has suddenly started using a lot of battery?

I recently noticed that my battery was draining much faster than usual. Upon checking the stats, I found that the highest amount of usage was from Google Play Newsstand. I do use this app, but only occasionally, so I was surprised by this. I checked the settings and set the app to only donwload on wi-fi and only when plugged in. 

In spite of making these changes, I found that Google Play Newsstand is still using the most battery of any service/app. I have attached a screenshot of recent battery usage.

I was surprised that I couldn't find any reports of this problem online, so I thought I'd throw this out here and see if anyone has had similar issues recently.
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+Heyno Despotovic, according to the screenshot, the sync is on.
I would think it might be background WiFi scanning as well, can't really see it from here
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Chandran Seshagiri

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I know that many of the folks following me here on Google+ are scientists, so I'd like to throw out a question to the audience:

The following is an ad for the new Samsung Galaxy Note:

Samsung Galaxy Note - Meet the Note

This ad and pieces of it are running in the US right now. Watch the video from about 0:18 to 0:25 seconds (the part about the stylus). I'm curious whether anyone else was as disturbed as I was by the apparent promotion of using the stylus to manipulate data in a graph?
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good moraning
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Very cool work on new approaches to neurostimulation. This is very exciting because of the potential for highly focal stimulation. I don't completely understand the underlying technology of the quantum dots, but if there are ways to harness this for non-invasive simulation, this offers a pretty powerful new tool in the arsenal for non-pharmaceutical, neural interventions.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/02/120208132721.htm
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More Clayton Christensen in Technology Review:

http://www.technologyreview.com/business/39205/

I think it's great that larger companies are embracing disruptive technologies (even at the potential short term cost of cannibalizing/undercutting their own cash cows).

In the Medical technology space, I think this will be even more critical - the innovation that the health care industry needs most desperately right now are exactly the sort of ideas that Clayton Christensen associates with disruptive technology:

1) Low cost alternative of existing technologies
2) Alternative and unconventional business models

I am encouraged by this article and the idea that the large, incumbent firms are paying more attention to disruptive opportunities - these large incumbent companies tend to have deep pockets and are well positioned to leverage cross platform opportunities that may be harder for startups with limited resources.
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Interesting article from Technology Review about the decline and fall of Kodak. On the surface it appears to be classic case of a technology leader being displaced because they failed to understand a new, disruptive technology. However, according to this article, Kodak were pioneers in digital photography, and even when the market was still very small with fairly minimal prospect of big revenues, management was still willing to put resources into developing the tech. Unfortunately (for Kodak), the new technology rendered their greatest strengths - picture development and processing - irrelevant.

Technology Review: You Press the Button. Kodak Used to Do the Rest. http://goo.gl/mag/IgahW
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Chandran Seshagiri

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US Biomedical Researchers - NIH Director wants to hear how the sequester is affecting your research

NIH Director Francis Collins just posted the following on twitter:

I want to hear; tell me how the #sequester is affecting your biomedical research right now. Use #NIHSequesterImpact

If you're a researcher in the US impacted by the sequester, I urge you to get on twitter and respond to this request.
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I'm sure this is a recurring theme in US public discourse, but over the past decade, basic science research has come under increasing attack from politicians who single out basic science research that seems frivolous or unnecessary.

These attacks miss a fundamental point that a lot of the major technological advances of the past century were built on the foundations of basic research, and yes, not all of this work seemed relevant or translational in the moment.

I applaud President Obama for taking a moment to defend peer review as the basis of strong science policy...I'm sure this will go largely unnoticed, but I think it is important to recognize and call attention to the President's remarks.

As someone who did a basic science Ph.D., but then found my place in the world working in industry on application, I am incredibly aware that most of the new technologies that we develop in industry are built on the backs of basic science. And much of this comes from passionate people who are simply curious about the world around them, and in ways that don't always obviously translate into application.

The US has been built on the dedicate passion and drive of individuals who are driven by motivations that often exceed profit and personal rewards. To begin demanding that all basic science justify it's existence beyond the simple curiosity and passion of smart, dedicated individuals, is to assume that we will advance as a country by turning out backs on knowledge. 
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Sorry? Which commenter??
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I know that there is a great science community here in Google+ (and I am fortunate that a good part of this community follows me here).

I'm increasingly frustrated by the level of discourse around basic science research and funding in the US these days. In particular, I find the cherry picking and bashing of seemingly obscure research projects a real failure of science discourse in the country.

As a response to this, and inspired by the great response from Patricia Brennan in Slate after being a target of these attacks, I'm considering creating some form of online platform to regularly (daily, weekly?) highlight basic science research that has (not obviously) translated into amazing advancements and technology.

I'd like to take advantage of this platform on Google+ to solicit any and all research that anyone thinks would be worthy of inclusion in such a listing/database - this could obviously be historical instances, or if, like Patricia Brennan, you would like to address contemporary research that you have been involved with, that would be great!

Looking forward to see what comes in!
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More interesting non-invasive neural stimulation work (h/t @neurotechnology on twitter)

http://news.engineering.iastate.edu/2012/02/07/iowa-state-steptoe-group-partner-to-treat-brain-disorders/

There's clearly a long road of research ahead to really refine technologies like this. However, developments like these make me optimistic that these devices/technologies will improve, and solutions will be found to deliver very targeted stimulation. With increasing sophistication in the these technologies, it's probably not too far in the future before these technologies start to offer real, effective, non-pharmaceutical interventions for a variety of neural pathologies.
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oh nice and good moraning
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US Politics Geek Alert!

While trying to figure out why last night's Republican primary/caucus events didn't win anyone any delegates, I came across the following website which explains the rules for each states primary or caucus:

http://frontloading.blogspot.com/?m=1

I highly recommend it for any political geeks out there (it's a bit disconcerting how loose some of the caucus rules are)
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Clayton Christensen is well known for developing the theory of disruptive innovation. He has written a couple of great books outlining the challenges of disruptive innovation to incumbent/market leaders. This theory outlines a cautionary tale for leaders of large companies who are often too focused on the short term growth of established technologies.

This Technology Review article points out that Clayton Christensen is investing in the technologies and companies that he identifies as disruptive technologies based on his own theories:

http://www.technologyreview.com/business/39352/

I am very curious to know how effective this is as an investment strategy. In particular, one of the characteristics that defines disruptive technologies is an initially small target market for the technology in question. In sharp contrast to our quarterly-driven investors, for this to be successful, it will require more patience to allow time for these technologies to mature to a point where they are truly disruptive to incumbent enterprises.

I'm assuming that there's no easy way to track the performance of Christensen's investments, but it would be interesting to see how they perform relative to more traditional VCs and investment houses.
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+Rachel Blum: Agreed - of course, these are only five public companies that Christensen was willing to reveal to the magazine. Who knows how many other companies (public and private) the fund is invested in.

I think your last point is the key - by the very definition of his theory of disruptive innovation, these companies will take a little while to mature. I'd be interested to know how long they will sit on these investments, and what would trigger a decision to get out of a particular investment.
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