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J Dark
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Cultivate a taste for distasteful truths -Ambrose Bierce
Cultivate a taste for distasteful truths -Ambrose Bierce

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One man. An extraordinary choice.

"The Names of Heaven" by Flavia Idà is available in hardcover, trade paperback, and digital editions. Signed copies are also available!

Discover his decision for yourself today!
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Here's the new cover artwork for 'Beguiling Voices'. I think the artist really did a great job!

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Nothing in the world can take the place of Persistence.
Talent will not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent.
Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb.
Education will not; the world is full of educated derelicts.
Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent.
The slogan 'Press On' has solved, and always will solve the problems of the human race.

-Calvin Coolidge

These words keep me going when I start to despair and think about leaving something 'just good enough'. I could do better, and these words help me remember that 'just good enough' is not what I'm capable of. I'm better than that, and writing is a joy. Why should I screw up what I love by settling for 'just good enough'?
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Thought for the day

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One thing that is interesting is personal perspective. As Stephen King once put it: "When you look at a pond in the forest, you may think it's a romantic spot. I look at it and see fog rising up off of it as dead growth surrounds it." It's not an exact quote, but you see the point. Everyone sees things differently. Which brings me to character perspective. How does your character in your story see things? How they interpret everything that goes on around them will influence every aspect of the scene they are in. If they share the scene with another character, it can get interesting if they see the setting before them completely at odds with the main character. Conflict isn't just physical or social, it's in every aspect you can think of. Perspective is one that can really liven up a scene when done with seeing it through the characters eyes
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One thing I've found is that I do truly enjoy writing, and I am finding the more I write, the more I like the editing, as the edits are from someone who read the story and cares enough to make a comment.

If you read a book, take the time to send a comment to the writer. I'm going to start reviewing stories in Goodreads again, as if I want comments, I should also give them. Comments and suggestions are win-win in my mind.
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How do you know when to edit a story? Easy. If you've written it, you always should look it over. Editing happens when the story is finally out of your head and on paper, or in your computer. Now you can look it over for redundancy (my big problem), overblown writing, confusing passages, and deviations from the core o the story. If you're not comfortable doing it right away, start a new story, let the old one percolate. But have fun with editing. You can find new ways to say things, a new idea that clarifies a section, or just find a way to add a corny joke in character. The thing is, it's hard to not to dread editing, because it changes the story. Don't look at it that way. Editing clarifies the story, and gives you a second chance to see where you can improve it.
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When I think of characters, I try to determine what is the type o motivation for them. The antagonist, to me, has to be more developed than the protagonist, as it is the antagonist that shapes the story around the main characters. That character has to have a rock-solid reason to do what s/he is doing, or the story falls flat. A dynamic antagonist with a solidly based development and personality, makes the story more compelling as the readers can feel the difference. This is what makes a character stand out. That s/he is solid in motivation, solid in thinking, and solid in performance in the story.
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I can see where people's styles can get lost in 'improvement'. As you go through your writing evolution, your style and story delivery will shift. Sometimes it's a very big shift that changes you fundamentally, more often it changes your style subtly, smoothing out rough spots and cleaning up redundancies and perhaps dialog or descriptive inadequacies. But as you improve, one can get lost in the improvements and forget that the joy of writing really does flow onto the pages. This 'feeling' can get lost in the professionalism of writing in my mind. I think this is why I like the early books of most authors. They may not be a technically good, or storytelling good, but they have a feel, a joy to them that later books, while better polished, have only the shiny polish to the feel of the story.
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“Would you say you were loved by the right people at the right time in the right way and for the right reasons?”

"Children of the Wrong Time" by Flavia Idà is available in hardcover, trade paperback, and digital edition. Signed copies are also available!

Explore a possible future of parenthood today!
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