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Van Stavern Small Animal Hospital
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#6: What can I do for my dog between dental cleanings?
There are a variety of daily activities you can do at home to help prevent dog periodontal disease.
For example, you can:
Give your dog a dental chew
Add a drinking water additive to your dog’s water bowl to fight plaque and freshen breath
Squirt a dental oral rinse into your dog’s mouth (If your dog is sensitive to drinking water additives, many families find this option to be a good alternative.)
Brush your dog’s teeth with a special toothbrush and toothpaste
We know you may be thinking, “Seriously! Brush my dog’s teeth?!?”
If you’re skeptical or nervous, don’t worry. We’re here to help you understand your options.
We can help you figure out what works best for your dog and show you the right brushing techniques.
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Blue eyed baby...
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#5: What are some signs of dog periodontal disease that I should be looking for at home?
Keep in mind, dog periodontal disease can be difficult to identify. Plus, dogs are good at hiding pain.
For example, dogs with severe cases of periodontal disease may still be eating regularly.
Ultimately, though, they’ll reach a point in which they start swallowing their food without chewing it.
Nonetheless, you may notice your dog has:
Bad breath
Irritated gums
Heavy salivation
Problems picking up food
Reluctance to eat (particularly in cats)
A tendency to chew on one side of the mouth, and/or
Bumps and lumps in the mouth
If you begin to notice any of these symptoms, it’s best to bring your dog in for a veterinary visit.
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It's Monday!! Grab some coffee and be Awesome!!
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This symbol means that we have chosen to undergo regular evaluations to maintain our AAHA accreditation. Not every hospital puts in the work and chooses to earn this designation, but we’re proud to say we do!
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#4: What causes dog periodontal disease?
Dog periodontal disease is an inflammation and infection in the gums around your pet’s teeth. It’s caused by bacteria.
The bacteria build up in your dog’s mouth. They form soft plaque that can get underneath the gum line and harden into tartar.
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Dental FAQ #3: Do I really need to bring my dog in once a year for teeth cleaning?

Dental disease (aka, pet periodontal disease) is the most widespread disease in adult dogs and cats.
As many as 85% of dogs have the disease by the time they’re three or four years old.
If pet periodontal disease isn’t treated, it can really harm your dog’s body:
Causing chronic pain
Destroying your dog’s teeth, gums and bones
Contributing to even more serious issues, such as damage to your dog’s major organs

The good news is you can easily prevent periodontal disease in your dog, particularly if you start early.

It simply takes a combination of using dog dental care products at home and regular dental cleanings.

You can save your dog from a lot of discomfort and pain. Not to mention, you can save yourself a lot of money.

As other Van Stavern pet families will tell you, prevention is much less expensive than removing teeth!
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Because we're AAHA accredited, we are required to use monitoring equipment while your pet is under anesthesia and monitor your pet's vital signs throughout their surgery. Learn more about this AAHA standard here: https://www.aaha.org/pet_owner/about_aaha/why_accreditation_matters/about_accreditation/aaha_standards_require_anesthesia_monitoring_equipment_for_your_pet.aspx
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