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Gamze Sart
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The #needfinding #empathy #webinar will start in less than 10 minutes! Again, we will be live-tweetng the event, so stay tuned! #stanfordCPD
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Q1: What is the role of risk-taking in gen ideas? How do people overcome fear of failure? Ans: Have some lvl of comfort w/failing.
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New research has uncovered a growing disconnect between donors and community-based nonprofits. Join Part 1 of the SSIR Live! webinar series, The Giving Code, on February 28 to learn how this trend can affect you. Register now: http://bit.ly/ChangingLandscape
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Intelligence explosion
First there was a lot of scepticism about the warnings Nick Bostrom and others gave about artificial intelligence. But it seems those concerns are still there and need attention.
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Yapar zeka
Yeni Bir dönem
Transfer learning
On the long road towards a general artificial intelligence is transfer learning important. The ability of an AI to learn from different tasks and apply its pre-learned knowledge to a completely new task. Deepmind has made some progress in this field.
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Yasam bilimleri onemli
Obezite hakkinda bilmediklerimiz
Fructose is generated in the human brain

Fructose, a form of sugar linked to obesity and diabetes, is converted in the human brain from glucose, according to a new Yale study. The finding raises questions about fructose's effects on the brain and eating behavior. The study was published on Feb. 23 by JCI Insight.
Fructose is a simple sugar found in fruits, vegetables, table sugar, and many processed foods. Excess consumption of fructose contributes to high blood sugar and chronic diseases like obesity. The Yale research team had demonstrated in a prior study that fructose and another simple sugar, glucose, had different effects on brain activity. But it was not known whether fructose was produced in the brain or crossed over from the bloodstream. To investigate, the research team gave eight healthy, lean individuals infusions of glucose over a four-hour period. They measured sugar concentrations in the brains of the study participants using magnetic resonance spectroscopy, a noninvasive neuroimaging technique. Sugar concentrations in the blood were also assessed.
The researchers found cerebral fructose levels rose significantly in response to a glucose infusion, with minimal changes in fructose levels in the blood. They surmised that the high concentration of fructose in the brain was due to a metabolic pathway called the polyol pathway that converts glucose to fructose."In this study, we show for the first time that fructose can be produced in the human brain," said first author Janice Hwang, M.D., assistant professor of medicine. While the production of fructose in the brain had been seen in animals, it had not been demonstrated in humans, Hwang noted. The finding raises several key research questions, which the research team plans to pursue. "By showing that fructose in the brain is not simply due to dietary consumption of fructose, we've shown fructose can be generated from any sugar you eat," said Hwang. "It adds another dimension into understanding fructose's effects on the brain."_
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Yapay Zeka her alanda yeni bir dönem açıyor...
AI is more than a passing fad or unfortunate bubble. It’s the future.
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