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Amina Samy
Works at Arab Development Initiative
Attended McGill University
Lived in Montreal
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Amina Samy

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Oh man. +Chris Guillebeau makes me love and hate the world simultaneously. Throwing little snippets of awesome my way on a semi-regular basis, only for me to enjoy it from this little cubicle.

+David El Achkar , +Majd Khaldi you might enjoy this :)
 
$100 Startup: Official Trailer

Today we're debuting the official trailer for The $100 Startup. Google+ gets it first -- I've posted it on my blog but haven't mailed the list or shared anywhere else yet.

Filming and production were overseen by +Wes Wages. Wes traveled to four cities to interview several of the people whose stories appear in the book.

We're now at T-8 days until the book launches. I'll be traveling to 22 cities for the first leg of the tour, and hope to see many of you on the road. (The schedule is at 100startup.com/#tour).

If you like the trailer, pass it on! Thanks for being a big part of this project.
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bonjwr😘
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Amina Samy

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That's right!
Arab Development Initiative originally shared:
 
Stay up to date with our latest activities, and sign up for our newsletter today
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salut cv 
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Amina Samy

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Arab Development Initiative originally shared:
 
... And we're up! Welcome to our official Google+ page. Still trying to get the hang of it, so bear with us. In the meantime, make sure to check out our website for more information about who we are and what we do:

http://arabdevelopment.com/
Support ADI · Shop · Envision Arabia Summit · Register · Speakers · Divisions · Health and Well Being · Society and Culture · Law and Human Rights · Economic Development · Education · Science and Tech...
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C LE CANADA CHANGE DE PAYS
 ·  Translate
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Amina Samy

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+Nabil Dalle Please show this to your sister!
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iiiiiiiiiimmmmmmmmmmmmm
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Hello Planet;
It's me. Amina.

I've been thinking about you a lot recently, and all those days we spent together doing nothing and everything at the same time. The days spent completely enveloped in the bliss of each others company. Absolutely and completely mesmerized.

Those days are long gone, but I know that someday, somehow we will find each other again. And still- to me- you're still the most beautiful thing ever.

--- END SCENE ---

Screw this. SOMEONE PUT ME ON A PLANE ALREADY.
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3alika assalem!
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Amina Samy

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Delhi: A City of [lost] Dreams, Disposable People, and Dichotomies.

A must-see short documentary; and I'm not just saying this as an India enthusiast :)
Interesting take on the subject on land and migrant rights, specifically in the context of slum development.

Added bonus: Great filming, and awesome soundtrack.
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dear friend are jurnalist 
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Amina Samy

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Too awesome.
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bonjour
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Wamda originally shared:
 
Entrepreneurship is not a luxury today, speakers seemed to say at the 6th Annual Global Competitiveness Forum last week. As global policy makers and thought…
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sl
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Any bakers out there?
I love this girl.

She doesn't know me. But I think we're best friends.
made with love, baked from scratch
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well don
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Amina Samy

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Bookshelf Porn = Too awesome for words.
I am now accepting applications for master carpenters :)
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I like thies
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Derek Slater originally shared:
 
Intro to an innovation agenda for 2012
cc +Nicklas Lundblad +Betsy Masiello +Dorothy Chou +Patrick Ryan +Brittany Smith +Alex Kozak +Kat Wang +Adrienne St. Aubin +TheRealKen +Jonathan Hall +Deven Desai +Eric Davis +Allie Basker +Dex Torricke-Barton +Travis Mason +TheRealPatriciaW +Max Senges +Lokman Tsui +Jess Hemerly +Charlie Hale

We live in a rapidly changing economic, cultural, and societal environment. At least the following three assumptions seem safe:

Embracing the full power of the Internet is essential to addressing the central economic, social, and political challenges we face today. Looking just at our nation’s economic challenges, the data is clear: the Internet creates 2.6 jobs for every 1 it displaces and represents trillions of dollars in global GDP, with growth of 21% over the last 5 years in mature economies.

Policymaking needs to be data-driven, with measurement and metrics built for the information society: We cannot measure the information society by industrial society metrics. The above stats are only a piece of the Internet’s full impact. Looking just at GDP, Wikipedia contributes $0.00 to the economy. The Internet has been a powerful source of creativity, with more music, video, written words, and other content being produced than ever before; this cannot be measured by looking at how many CDs and DVDs are sold.

To harness the full potential of the Internet, we need data-driven innovation policies. Given the Internet’s immense contributions to the economy, culture, and society, we have to ask: how does all that good stuff come about? what makes the Internet special? and how can we accelerate that growth (while mitigating the harms)?


To us, those are among the central questions of 21st century innovation policy, and it’s the subject of this short paper. We focus on Internet innovation not because it is the only driver of innovation today, but rather because the Internet is increasingly intimately connected to virtually every facet of our economy, our society, and our lives.

What is innovation, where does it come from, and why does the Internet matter?

Peter Drucker defines innovation as "the effort to create purposeful, focused change in an enterprise's economic or social potential." The central driver for innovation is the idea: ideas allow us to take resources and make something more out of them. As economist Paul Romer puts it, the biggest advances come from better recipes for how we can use the ingredients at our disposal, rather than simply more cooking.

Good ideas alone are not enough, of course. There needs to be the right social, cultural, market, and political environment for those ideas to be turned to new, productive uses. A better idea for how to reap wheat or manufacture pins means little if there is no effective means to implement the idea and then exchange the result with others. Just as Einstein built on Newton and the entire smartphone industry has followed the trail blazed by the iPhone, ideas build on top of one another. People need the knowledge and incentives to create and implement ideas, and communities need the means to communicate and collaborate in order to improve them.

The Internet is the most powerful infrastructure for the creation, exchange, and implementation of ideas. It empowers the individual, and it empowers individuals who wish to work together. In 1989, Tim Berners-Lee used the Internet to speak to other computer scientists around the world, and then come up with and implemented the World Wide Web. Through the Internet, he could make the foundational elements of the Web available to anyone, anywhere in the world. And just 22 years later, the Web has fundamentally transformed myriad aspects of modern life. Berners-Lee didn’t have to negotiate for permission to create the Web, nor did the people who built on top of it have to negotiate with him. Instead, they could innovate without having to get permission first.

“Innovation without permission” is what makes the Internet special: the ability for anyone, anywhere to create, exchange, and implement new ideas, and make them available to people all around the world, with minimal barriers to entry. And today, innovation without permission isn’t just for the geeks. When an artist sells their works direct to fans over the Internet, that’s innovation without permission; when you blog or tweet and reach billions without the need to own a TV network, that’s innovation without permission.

The proverbial “inventor in the garage” is a misleading concept here, for innovation is actually much more decentralized than even that suggests. The online services you use today were not the product of a few inventors, but rather of a process of evolution and competition among hundreds of thousands of entrepreneurs in an open market, innovating at the edge of the network -- myriad “guys (and girls) in the garage”, who were able to reach the market with minimal resources.

Innovation remains an evolving discipline of study, but research and experience suggests that policymakers need to adapt themselves to the way innovation happens today. Many government policies intended to increase innovation are focused on big company, big science, and big budget research projects. These policies can help sometimes, but they’re very different from an agenda that truly harnesses the decentralized innovation we see today.

Innovation isn’t a solved issue, nor is it always good for everyone. Innovation can be disruptive. It can reshape markets and industries. It can transform culture. It can be scary.

But it is also at the root of economic, social, and cultural advancement, as well as individual empowerment. And thus it’s essential that we find ways to maximize the good, while mitigating the transitory harms.

What’s ahead
This paper is not an exhaustive examination of what those policies ought to be. No one can claim to know the entire truth about how innovation works, but we believe that everyone can contribute with what they have learnt to be true about innovation.

The purpose of this innovation agenda is exactly that, to contribute our experience to the ongoing public discussion about innovation that is taking shape throughout different policy venues in the world today. Our hope is that this document can serve as a useful addition to the innovation policy dialogue globally, and that it can help frame a path forward.

The paper is structured around three key questions:
How can policymakers create the infrastructure for innovation?
Open
Data
Networks

How can policymakers foster the production and exchange of good ideas and useful knowledge?
Education
Creativity
Invention

How can policymakers ensure that good ideas become new businesses, organizations, and jobs?
Entrepreneurship
Investment
Trust

Case study: How can Internet innovation address big challenges?
Clean tech
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nice Post
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Amina Samy

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If a TV show were to be made out of my life, I'm almost 100% certain this would be my theme song.

"I love the whole world, and being part of it"- An oldie, but it's just too good!
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i love awhol world i love all the pepole
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  • Arab Development Initiative
    Social Media and Outreach Coordinator, present
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Montreal - Kuwait - Cairo - Jaipur
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Job-seeking super hobbyist.

Education
  • McGill University
    International Development/Economics, 2007 - 2011
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Female