Profile

Cover photo
Hemal Varambhia
Works at Abelson Info
17 followers|30,751 views
AboutPostsPhotosVideos

Stream

Hemal Varambhia

Shared publicly  - 
 
Scientific American Reader: New Cosmic Distance Measurement Points the Way to Elusive Dark Energy. http://google.com/producer/s/CBIwheje2Q4
1
Add a comment...

Hemal Varambhia

Shared publicly  - 
 
Rainbow Nation
1
Add a comment...

Hemal Varambhia

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Hugging hemes help electrons hop - Researchers simulating how certain bacteria run electrical current through tiny molecular wires have discovered a secret Nature uses for electron travel. The results are key to understanding how the bacteria do chemistry in the ground, and will help researchers use them in microbial fuel cells, batteries, or for turning waste into electricity. http://ow.ly/2CYqY8
1
Add a comment...

Hemal Varambhia

Shared publicly  - 
 
New Scientist News: Astrophile: Trio of dead stars could take on Einstein. http://google.com/producer/s/CBIwpJnZ6w8
1
Add a comment...
Have him in circles
17 people
Tejas Gajjar's profile photo
Devan Varambhia's profile photo
Nehal Gajjar's profile photo
James Munro's profile photo
Himanshu Gajjar's profile photo
Mala KV's profile photo
Chiara Piccarreta's profile photo

Hemal Varambhia

Shared publicly  - 
 
Joy, joy, joy!
1
Add a comment...
 
Scientific American Reader: Cheap Battery Can Store Energy for a Rainy Day. http://google.com/producer/s/CBIw8rDZ2g4
1
Add a comment...

Hemal Varambhia

Shared publicly  - 
 
 
Astronomy Picture of the Day: 01/15/14 – Barnard 68

Contrary to your first instinct upon viewing this image, this is not a black hole. Not in the conventional sense anyway. It isn't sucking in matter that comes too close to it. Instead, this is a dark absorption nebula that's located about 500 light-years away in the constellation Ophiuchus, known as Barnard 68 (the object itself is believed to be about half a light-year in length). Since all of the light from the background stars is being obstructed, astronomers can accurately determine that the cloud is close in distance (cosmically speaking, of course) to us.

In contrast to the surrounding stars of varying sizes and colors, the "black hole" is quite a sight indeed. These so-called "molecular clouds" are some of the coldest and most isolated places in the universe where all of the light being emitted from the stars inside of them is being blocked from view by high concentrations of fine dust and molecular gas. Said material absorbs most of (if not all) the light that can be seen at optical wavelengths.

As I mentioned previously, these things are both cold and dark. The temperature inside is a mere 10 kelvin above absolute zero (or about -440 degrees F/-263 C), which is around 40 degrees Fahrenheit colder than the dwarf-planet, Pluto. At these extreme temperatures, most of the carbon monoxide and nitrogen molecules have attached and frozen onto the tiny dust grains within the cloud, which are composed mainly of molecular hydrogen and atomic helium, with bits of heavier elements peppered throughout to contribute to the darkness. On that note, if you were able to shoot a trillion photons of yellow light through the center of the cloud, only one single photon would reach the other side!

Sources & Further Reading: http://www.fromquarkstoquasars.com/apod-barnard-68/

Image by João Alves (European Southern Observatory), Charles Lada (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics), and Elizabeth Lada (University of Florida), using the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope in Chile
1
Add a comment...

Hemal Varambhia

Shared publicly  - 
 
Scientific American Reader: Is the Universe Made of Math? [Excerpt] http://google.com/producer/s/CBIw36u8_A8
1
Add a comment...

Hemal Varambhia

Shared publicly  - 
1
Add a comment...
People
Have him in circles
17 people
Tejas Gajjar's profile photo
Devan Varambhia's profile photo
Nehal Gajjar's profile photo
James Munro's profile photo
Himanshu Gajjar's profile photo
Mala KV's profile photo
Chiara Piccarreta's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Software Developer
Skills
DDD, TDD, BDD, Java, C#, python, postgresql, android, iOS development, RoR, rspec, shoulda, chef API
Employment
  • Abelson Info
    Software Developer, 2012 - present
    Web and Mobile Application development
Links
Story
Introduction
Hi, my name is Hemal Varambhia and I am a web and mobile application developer based in Chiswick, West London.

My interests include Theoretical Physics, software development and engineering, 'Xena Warrior Princess' and 'The Big Bang Theory' (people tell me I am the closest person to Sheldon Cooper they know!)
Basic Information
Gender
Male