Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Allred-Astro.com
9 followers
9 followers
About
Allred-Astro.com's posts

Post has attachment
I uploaded a new galactic image to my website.  Take a look... It's a goodie!

http://www.allred-astro.com/viewer.php?id=135&cat=1&sub=102

Post has attachment
Hello again to all. I have been busy taking images of galaxies with my new homemade astrograph (telescope). This time I focused on a galaxy known as M106, which is a beautiful spiral galaxy near the Big Dipper. It is an active galaxy, with a giant black hole at its core. We can't see the black hole, but we can see the emissions from material that is being ejected from it. Please take time to go to my website and look over the image. When you get to the website, just click the image a couple of times to see the full version of the image. If you look around, you can see many smaller galaxies scattered all over the image.
Enjoy!

http://www.allred-astro.com//viewer.php?id=126&cat=1&sub=11

Post has attachment
I just uploaded a new image to my astronomy website.    Take a look!

This beautiful image was taken from my backyard observatory over two nights in April, 2013. It is one of my favorite objects in the sky, and I just love looking around the image at all the smaller galaxies, of which there are literally hundreds. * Messier 100 (also known as NGC 4321) is an example of a grand design spiral galaxy located within the southern part of constellation Coma Berenices. 


http://www.allred-astro.com//viewer.php?id=122&cat=1&sub=100
Photo

Post has attachment
Roughly ten thousand years ago, before the dawn of recorded human history, an incredible new light must suddenly have appeared in the night sky which faded after a few weeks. Today we know this light was an exploding star, and we can see the remnants as a colorful expanding cloud known as the Veil Nebula or Cirrus Nebula. Pictured here is the west end of the Veil Nebula, catalogued as NGC 6960 but less formally known as the Witch's Broom Nebula. The expanding debris cloud gains its colors as the expanding shockwave sweeps up and excites existing nearby hydrogen, oxygen, and sulfur gasses.  The supernova remnant lies about 1400 light-years away towards the constellation of Cygnus. This section of the Veil Nebula actually spans over three times the angular size of the full Moon, so it is quite large in the sky.  However, it has a relatively low surface brightness that requires long exposures in order to capture the subtle undulations in the shockwave surface. The bright star 52 Cygni is visible with the unaided eye from a dark location but unrelated to the ancient supernova.

Here is a link to the full version with details…
http://www.allred-astro.com/viewer.php?file=nebulae&itemNum=17
Photo

I am about to release a new version of my website, programmed by Sean Olsen Design!
Wait while more posts are being loaded