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The ADHD Homestead
16 followers -
Helping ADHD families create a peaceful, organized life together.
Helping ADHD families create a peaceful, organized life together.

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This has been in my Netflix queue, but I haven't gotten to it yet. If you have a teenager in your life, you may want to read this short essay -- especially given that kids with #ADHD are at greater risk for self-harm.

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“Brian laughed and said, “It’s not a label, numbnuts, it’s a fact. Why the hell waste time denying what’s real? I sure as hell don’t. And neither does my blind friend Michael. There’s great power in acceptance, the power of accepting that you see the world differently than the regular Joe because your life experience is totally different. And then surprising the hell out of the regulars. Michael and I pretty much advertise our difference with society. But you look pretty normal, you can pass. Until you open your mouth and talk like you do, going all over the place, and still make great sense if somebody takes the time to listen. But most folks don’t. You’re pretty nuts, man. You should tell people the truth about it. You might get other people to open up, too.””

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Hosting: it can be a minefield for #ADHDWomen (and all homemakers with #AdultADHD). I love hosting guests, even though my #ADHD sometimes gets in the way.

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This is kind of embarrassing, but I suspect many #ADHDWomen can relate: I have a lot of trouble getting dressed in the morning. If I give myself too many options, or hold onto too many clothing pieces that don't excite me, I become paralyzed by indecision. My brain gets overwhelmed and shuts down.

Simplifying and minimizing my wardrobe has helped A LOT. If you have #ADHD / #AdultADHD and haven't tried it, I highly recommend taking a ruthless sweep through your closet. Simplifying by color further reduces stress by eliminating the fuss over what matches and what doesn't.

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In a previous life, I worked in human resources. Between that and having #AdultADHD myself, I learned a few things about the Americans With Disabilities Act, employer accommodations, and when it's a good idea to disclose your #ADHD to your boss -- or not. I also learned that even though ADHD is a disabilty, that doesn't always prevent you from being fired for it.

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Many people don't realize that stimulants affect #ADHD brains differently. This is a great example, and one I can relate to. I used to take two shorter-acting doses of Ritalin per day, and I once fell asleep in a hammock 20 minutes following my after-lunch dose. This surprised me because I'm NOT a napper. Even when I'm exhausted, it's pretty much impossible for me to settle long enough to take a nap during the day.

Unless, it turns out, I have a fresh dose of stimulants to help things along.

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I say this all the time: your brain isn't for storing your to-do list, it's for brainstorming and problem-solving and idea-generating. I've always coped with overwhelm by writing things down. It's especially important for people with #ADHD / #AdultADHD

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I can relate to much of what Liz is saying here -- especially that desire to create a certain kind of home environment, and the shame that often results from falling short.

This isn't just about social expectations. I thrive and feel happier in a well-kept home. It's what I want for myself and my family, not what my family and the world wants from me. When you have #AdultADHD, it's a daily struggle. When you fall short, there's this sense that "this isn't me, but it's what everyone sees."

#ADHDWomen

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I received an email this weeked about teen drivers with #ADHD. It made me realize, this June marks 16 years since my driver's license test. I've officially been driving for half my life. My primary vehicle has always been a five-speed, and I think it's made me a better driver.

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“I don’t remember whether I liked my dad calling me “Jacly.” I can see myself appreciating that someone gave me a nickname. Just as likely, I might’ve gotten my hackles up. All the anguish I remember from my childhood stemmed from my ADHD, though I had no idea at the time. ADHD’s quirks and foibles — like misspelling one’s own name, or throwing a third-grade classmate on the floor after he cuts in line — can come to define us. And that hurts. Maybe it’s who we are, but it’s not who we feel we are.” #ADHD
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