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Shawn Handran
1,021 followers -
Teaching, Bible Study Tools, Data Science, Visualization, Photography, Biology and Biotechnology
Teaching, Bible Study Tools, Data Science, Visualization, Photography, Biology and Biotechnology

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Genealogy of the Patriarchs in Genesis from Adam to Abraham

I created this biblical visualization in Tableau Public of the patriarch lineages in the Book of Genesis. Be sure to mouse-over for additional information in the tooltip, including the relevant Scripture passage for each patriarch.

https://public.tableau.com/profile/shawn.handran#!/vizhome/GenealogyofthePatriarchsinGenesisfromAdamtoAbraham/PatriarchLineagesinGenesis
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I created this tutorial as a beginner's guide for using Photoshop and Google Nik Collection to process the images of Jupiter collected by the Juno spacecraft.

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I created this tutorial as a beginner's guide for using Photoshop and Google Nik Collection to process the images of Jupiter collected by the Juno spacecraft.

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I created this tutorial as a beginner's guide for using Photoshop and Google Nik Collection to process the images of Jupiter collected by the Juno spacecraft.

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Getting Started with Tableau Public: A microcredential mini-course on Badge List

Interested in getting into data visualization, business analytics, or data science but aren't sure where to start? A great starting point for beginners is Tableau Public, a free desktop app based on the popular and powerful Tableau Software analytics program.

Tableau is intuitive and easy-to-use, features a host of pre-made visualizations (graphs), and most of the functionality is accessible through drag-and-drop or double-click mouse actions. If you're willing to spend a few minutes watching some short tutorial videos, you can get up to speed in less than an hour and start creating powerful, interactive visualizations in a couple hours time (most of which is going to be outside of Tableau finding and curating datasets of interest). As you become more familiar and comfortable with the features (and if you're willing to spend some more time searching Tableau's extensive and helpful Knowledge Base resource), you can learn more advanced functionality, such as creating map visualizations, filtering on variables, and using functions to analyze or transform data.

A little over a year ago, I took the plunge and started learning Tableau Public on my own (self study). The introductory videos and Knowledge Base articles (which I usually search on Google instead of directly from the Tableau KB website) were pretty much all I needed to get started. My purpose in learning Tableau Public was to introduce the vocation of data science to students in my AP Statistics class and to find ways to bring real-life data visualization experience into the classroom. I'm always on the lookout for large, publicly-available datasets that are (hopefully) in a format that doesn't require too much fiddling in a spreadsheet program.

I set up a public profile (here: https://public.tableau.com/profile/shawn.handran#!/), started analyzing datasets of interest, and uploaded the visualizations to my Tableau Public page.

Just a few weeks into my learning journey, I was (unexpectedly) asked to speak on data visualization at the 2015 inaugural Science Teacher Conference hosted by The Society for Science and the Public in Washington DC. I chose to give a talk that would hopefully encourage and inspire other high school teachers to bring data science in the classroom by lowering the barriers to entry for both teachers and students. You can see my presentation on Slideshare here: http://www.slideshare.net/ShawnHandran/beginners-guide-to-getting-public-data-into-the-classroom

In that same spirit, I took my own learning experience with Tableau Public and created a mini-course on Badge List to help others take the plunge into data visualization themselves. Simply visit the course homepage (https://www.badgelist.com/tableau) and press the Join Badge button to get started (the best place to start is here: https://www.badgelist.com/tableau/Create-a-Tableau-Public-Account). The learning process is broken down into logical step-by-step learning objectives (badges) to master the various aspects of visualizing public data using Tableau. Each badge contains straightforward and simple instructions along with examples posted by other learners who have already completed the badge (right now, there's only my visualizations but I hope this increases as other join and complete the badges!). Two of the badges contain a wiki with links to popular public datasets or Knowledge Base help articles, which learners can contribute to in order to enhance the learning experience for everyone. As you complete each badge by providing the requested evidence, you'll earn a microcredential (digital badge) that can be added to your digital portfolio on Mozilla Backpack or to your profile on LinkedIn.

Here are a few visualizations to whet your appetite. Most took a couple hours of work in total including searching and collating the data (this tends to be the most time consuming step) and creating a series of visualizations and interactive dashboards.

Malignant Cancer Death Rate by County
https://public.tableau.com/profile/shawn.handran#!/vizhome/MalignantCancerMap/MalignantCancer2008-2012

World Mortality by Cause, WHO 2012
https://public.tableau.com/profile/shawn.handran#!/vizhome/WHOMortalitybyTypeandAgeGroup2012/Dashboard1

FM Stations in the US
https://public.tableau.com/profile/shawn.handran#!/vizhome/FMStations/FMStationsUS

AM Stations in the Western Hemisphere
https://public.tableau.com/profile/shawn.handran#!/vizhome/AMStationsWesternHemisphere/AMStationsWesternHemisphere

USDA Employment Data
https://public.tableau.com/profile/shawn.handran#!/vizhome/USDAEmploymentData/MedianIncomebyCounty2014

As you can see, I am by no means a data visualization wizard! But I did learn how to make data visualizations of some very interesting datasets using a sophisticated and elegant software package. If you were hesitant to take the plunge, you've now got a simple, free, and easy-to-use mini-course to get you started. I hope to see you on my Badge List course and look forward to seeing what kind of visualizations you create!

Note: I don't make revenue or income of any kind for this course or writing about the software and web services in this article; it's free and no strings attached! :)

#tableau #tableaupublic #badgelist #digitalbadging #microcredential #badges #bigdata #datavisualization #datascience #analytics #publicdata
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FM Stations in the US by Antenna Height, Station Class, and Horizontal Effective Radiated Power (ERP)

This was a fun one to create. I've been gradually learning Tableau Public: 1) for the fun of it; 2) to stimulate interest in data analysis in my high school AP Statistics students; and 3) to get myself more proficient in finding, handling and analyzing large publicly-available datasets. A long term goal being helping other teachers get this type of learning into the classroom without fear.

I was commuting one day and noticed the communication towers (I usually don't). I wondered if there were a list of towers by height and began searching the FCC for public data. The data was easily found but the format was quite lacking in that the dataset of interest for communication tower data did not come in a delimited format. With some text and Excel maneuvering, I managed to get a visualization but it was unsatisfying due to the pure density of the data (not shown, see my Tableau Public profile).

Instead, I switched to FM station data, which did come in a delimited format, and took less Excel maneuvering (but still a reasonable amount to get the text strings converted to numerical; why these data managers put the unit along with the number in every single field when it can be put in the heading alone is beyond me). The results are much more satisfying. Interactivity with this dataset was problematic (due to being a "newb" with Tableau...), so I made it a bit more of a static visualization. There sure are a lot of FM stations across the country!

Tableau Public link:
https://public.tableau.com/profile/shawn.handran#!/vizhome/FMStations/FMStationsUS

#tableau
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Fun with DOE College Scorecard data on Tableau Public

Picking a college is at the forefront of my mind just about every day. Not only is my daughter in the college search process, but I'm also a high school teacher teaching college-level courses. So it seems I'm always trying to give my daughter and students as much information about college as I can (often they don't want to hear it!).

Being a data nerd, I took a subset of the Department of Education's College Scorecard data and gave it a try on Tableau Public (I'm teaching myself Tableau Public, inspired by my G+ friend +Robert Rouse, so I'm always looking for interesting data to crunch). Here are a few visualizations that should provide food-for-thought whether you're a student, parent, teacher or any other professional in education.

The interactive dataset on Tableau Public is here at this URL: https://goo.gl/r5i69u

Be sure to mouse over datapoints to see a tooltip with useful information. All the data and maps are interconnected, so if you click on any item on one element, it will isolate and update all the other views. Very useful!

A couple points in more detail:

1. There are two maps, one showing every institute color coded by type (public, private, for-profit) and size (bubble size correlates with number of undergraduate enrollments); the second map shows total enrollments by state, so you can see where undergraduates go at the state level. My state, California, is the 800 lb gorilla in collegiate education.

2. There are two data graphs (and one table that tabulates the state map data). One graph shows tuition (in-state) vs. SAT score (mean); and another shows the proportion of part-time faculty vs. tuition (in-state). Both maps are color-coded by institution type. Be sure to click on a state in the state map so the view isolates only the data for that state.

I've been following the plight of adjunct faculty with interest for a while now (it is, after all, my job sector although I myself have never taught at a college institute), and +Laura Gibbs posts a number of interesting articles and commentary on the subject--most recently, a timely one for me entitled "What parents need to know about college faculty." You can read it here: https://plus.google.com/+LauraGibbs/posts/5KUcTmowqmt

Correction: the data metric is proportion of faculty who are full time; not proportion who are part time. The latter data is not available in the College Scorecard dataset. The incorrectly labeling is now corrected.

Be sure to interact with the data on Tableau Public and let me know if you do anything interesting with the data (you can download my dataset instead of trying to build up your own version, which takes several hours of formatting and trimming down).

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Interesting visualization of world languages by Alberto Lucas López, using data from Ethnologue.
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