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National Breast Cancer Foundation
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Research for longer, better lives
Research for longer, better lives

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Despite significant improvements in breast cancer survival, there is still one type of breast cancer waiting for research to discover a way to further personalise treatment and save more lives.
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Many women give up taking life-saving hormone treatments after breast cancer before the recommended 5 year time-frame, mostly due to side-effects. This life-saving treatment, however, substantially reduces the risk of breast cancer returning, so when NBCF and Cancer Australia co-funded a recent study, it was important to find out if whether women engaged with their doctors at the right point to consider ways to manage the side-effects before stopping the medication. Read the study findings here. http://nbcf.org.au/news/featured-news/study-investigates-the-role-of-doctors-in-womens-decision-on-treatment/
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We know that mammograms save lives, but screening for breast cancer can be improved so that it can spot cancers in dense breast tissue. Find out the motivation behind Professor Martin Ebert’s research into a ‘no harm, no touch’ breast screening method that could also detect cancer in dense breast tissue. http://bit.ly/2ugstsc
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Did you know that most women needing tumour removal after a breast cancer diagnosis will need to go back for more surgery? During June a successful NBCF-funded pilot study received more funding to trial a smart surgical glove and reduce the number of surgeries women need. You can read about this and other breast cancer research highlights from June. http://nbcf.org.au/news/research-blog/monthly-breast-cancer-research-update-june-2017/
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Women with inherited faulty BCRA genes now have a clearer picture of their lifetime risk of breast cancer, thanks to a new Australian study. http://nbcf.org.au/news/research-news/new-australian-study-clarifies-risk-for-faulty-brca-carriers/
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Breast cancer is now the most common cancer facing Australian women with 48 facing a diagnosis each day. It also has the highest incidence of all cancers in Australia.

Breast cancer diagnoses have increased due to the national breast screening program, changing lifestyles and our increasing population, but the good news is that survival from breast cancer is also improving.

Research into preventing breast cancer and better treatments can help reach our goal of zero deaths from breast cancer by 2030. http://nbcf.org.au/news/research-news/queensland-tops-the-country-for-breast-cancer/
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There are some risks for breast cancer that can't be changed, like a family history of the disease. But there are other risks which researchers call 'modifiable' and these are the ones we can change for better or worse. http://nbcf.org.au/about-national-breast-cancer-foundation/about-breast-cancer/what-you-need-to-know/breast-cancer-risks/
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Breast cancer is not only a woman's disease - although rare, men can develop breast cancer as well but there are some challenges to getting diagnosed. Read more: http://bit.ly/2qYyV6c
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Another research angle on breast cancerhttp://bit.ly/2pLESQo
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Breast cancer research discoveries announced in April covered a wide range of topics, including a rare type of breast cancer called inflammatory breast cancer, better understanding of treatment resistance, a new NBCF campaign on metastatic breast cancer and a way to detect it. All of these research discoveries give hope for a happier, healthier future.
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