Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Take 2
3 followers -
To raise global awareness in today's youth through the use of digital media, and to support them in educating a broader public through their creative products.
To raise global awareness in today's youth through the use of digital media, and to support them in educating a broader public through their creative products.

3 followers
About
Take 2's posts

Post has attachment
Cuba's Secret Side available for rental in YouTube

The DVD's are coming soon but if you want to go ahead and watch it in YouTube for $3.99 for 7-day viewing  click the below link.

Cuba's Secret Side

It is also available for download in Japanland:

http://www.japanlandonline.com/japanland109.html 


#cuba   #documentary   #travel   #rental   #youtuberentals   #youtube  

Post has attachment
Cuba's Secret Side Documentary

Coming soon this February, 2013.

30-second teaser for Cuba's Secret Side, a two-hour public television series premiering on February 1, 2013. 

For more information, visit, http://take2videos.org/LOCALES/CUBA.html

#cuba   #documentary   #take2videos  

Post has attachment
The Girl

I want to talk about travel.  Not the sitting-on-a-cruise-ship-sipping-a-cocktail type of travel, but the kind when you wake up one morning and say to yourself, “I think I’m going to go live with an East African warrior tribe for three months."

And that’s where most people get stuck. How on earth do you find a remote village in the Serengeti and a Maasai family willing to take you in?  And even if you do… how do you survive the three months after that?

The first part is easy.  In my case a friend put me in touch with an acquaintance, who knew of a village on the edge of the Rift Valley. “No problem,” the chief said with typical African generosity. He then added something about a 7-hour mini-bus ride and that I should get off at the baobab tree.

Foreigners were not thick on the ground out there, so within a few minutes of my arrival about thirty villagers had stopped what they were doing to come check me out.  I had one goal – I was looking for a girl.  I knew she was going to be between the ages of 8 and 14 – old enough to have empathy, young enough not to be married, and smart as a whip.  If I could find her, then my next three months would be a success. If not, then I was dead in the water.

At some point Nangakua, the first wife of the village chief, ambled over and said in rapid-fire Maasai, “Hey, you want something to eat?”  I didn’t understand a word.  Then the girl magically appeared, looked me in the eye, and said slowly and clearly, “You.  Eat.  Now.”  And I knew the next three months were going to be just fine.  Her name was Ndutu and she became my shadow.  Within a day she knew my entire Maasai vocabulary and drilled me relentlessly on grammar and new words.  She also taught me where to haul water, how to chew on a twig from the toothbrush tree to keep my teeth clean, and a million other things including how not to get eaten by lions.  I reciprocated by telling her useless stuff like what a penguin looks like and that people have landed on the moon.  And though she didn’t know it, I put a down payment on several more cows to add to her dowry after I was gone.

It still wasn’t easy – the flies were maddening, my shoulders ached from scrubbing clothes in the river, and the women thought it endlessly hilarious that their cows refused to let down their milk for a foreigner.

Then one day I found myself sitting under an acacia tree, drinking a bowl of fresh blood and listening to Ndutu say, “and after the hyena dropped the goat, Nangakua took a stick and chased him clear across the plain…”  And it all seemed completely normal.

Here's what I’ve learned from twenty years of travel. There’s always a girl. And around her, an entire village waiting to welcome you and keep you safe.  You’ll have to trust me on this one.

- Karin Muller.

#take2   #charity   #travel   #serengeti  
Photo
Photo
2 Photos - View album

Post has attachment
Unsung Heroes in Sudan

In a Sudanese refugee camp, drinking water comes from a local well. The food distribution provides oil, sugar, sorghum or millet, and salt. A twice-weekly market offers a few luxuries like goat meat, limes, mangoes, peanuts, locally-baked flatbread, tomatoes, and dried fish. I filmed the market and the monthly UN food distribution as part of the Take 2 footage for students.

One North Carolina teacher decided to give her students a taste of what it might be like to live in that camp. She had them watch the footage and write down every food they saw. She then asked them to come up with recipes using only those ingredients. Finally, she got friends, parents, and colleagues to try making the recipes and used the results in a Sudan fundraiser where the public was invited to see what it was like to eat like a refugee. When it was over, the kids could tell you exactly what might be found in a North African marketplace. The public had learned about a foreign country that many of them had no connection with. And the kids raised over a thousand dollars to help the Sudanese refugees.

In a world that tends to focus only on what's wrong with our education system, I'm here to tell you that our students are in good hands.

- Karin Muller
Take2Videos.org

For more information about charity work in Sudan, click here for public and educators: http://take2videos.org/LOCALES/SUDAN.html


#take2videos   #sudan   #education   #northcarolina   #nc  
Photo

Post has attachment
A Wake-Up Call

"I'm filming a 27-year-old Chadian woman in North Africa. Her name is Fatima and she has seven children, with the eighth on the way. She's fiercely proud of both her cultural heritage and her Muslim faith, despite the fact that she's living in a plastic-covered hut in a refugee camp. I like her enormously for that.

When we're done with the interview, I offer her a chance to turn the tables. She has all the usual questions - my age, whether I’m married, have children, etc. As I’m taking apart my cameras I realize that I’m probably the only non-Muslim woman she’s ever spoken to. “Fatima,” I ask her without much thought, “what do you think of me?”

She looks me right in the eye.  “I think you’re a whore.”

I live for these moments.

The camera goes back on.  “Fatima, why – exactly - do you think I’m a whore?"

She levels an index finger at my face.  “I can see your hair.”

She has a point. I’m dressed head-to-toe in a traditional Chadian gown, but my headphones have pushed my scarf back and an inch of hair is visible. The fact that I can see both of Fatima’s breasts as she feeds her newest baby is not nearly as big a deal around here.  I straighten the scarf.  “Anything else?”

Fatima immediately lists over a dozen reasons why I’m a whore, starting with, “I know you’re wearing trousers under that dress” (true) and ending with, “and you’re here without a man.”

Until that moment I’d been secretly hoping that some of the younger Chadian girls would see me with my expensive cameras and realize that there might be more to life than hauling water and pounding millet. Fatima’s words prove how arrogant I am.  I don’t have to agree with everything the locals say and do, but I am here to learn about them - and how can I do that if I can’t at least see the world through their eyes and according to their beliefs?

- Karin Muller,

For more information visit: http://www.Take2Videos.org

#chad   #take2   #take2videos   #religion   #muslim  
Photo
Photo
2 Photos - View album

Post has attachment
Vote for the Best Student Video Documentary

Please choose the best of the three videos from the link. If you have kids please make them watch, it will be a good experience for them.

The following videos represent "The Best Of" from Global Studies students. 

This video project is comprised of footage from Karin Muller's experiences with Sudanese refugees.  

The curriculum can be found at Take2videos.org

http://www.take2videos.org

#take2   #sudan   #education  

Post has attachment
Motivate your students through filmmaking

Create classroom mini-documentaries - No media experience required!

The Take2 Youth Media Program takes advantage of today’s youthful fascination with technology in order to motivate active learning in environmental science, English, and media literacy. Working individually or collaborating in teams, students create short documentaries or public service announcements that are designed to inform, entertain, or advocate on issues illustrated by the footage provided. How-to videos, worksheets, PowerPoint presentations, and other activities lead students step-by step through the process of researching their topic, critically analyzing issues, and creating logical and persuasive arguments and compelling conclusions. Upon completion of their documentaries, students learn valuable leadership and public speaking skills by presenting their projects to classmates or to the general public. The curriculum is flexible and can be completed in as little as 5-7 classroom periods or (including optional activities) over the course of several months. Assessment rubrics and other teacher support materials are provided.

Each DVD contains a complete curriculum and up to three hours of broadcast-quality video footage. Teaching units are designed to support state and national standards. The first five topics (released in November 2011) are: The Water Cycle, California’s Water System, Global Warming, Solar Energy, and Wind Energy. The licensing fee is $50 per classroom per year.

Take2 is a 501(c)3 nonprofit.

For more information contact:

Karin Muller
Director
Take 2: The Student’s Point of View
www.take2videos.org
karin@karinmuller.com
(505) 990-6794

#japan #fishing #water #windenergy #globalwarming #environment
PhotoPhotoPhotoPhoto
4 Photos - View album

Post has attachment
Students and Take2

The Take2 Youth Media Program takes advantage of today’s youthful fascination with technology in order to motivate active learning in environmental science, English, and media literacy. Working individually or collaborating in teams, students create short documentaries or public service announcements that are designed to inform, entertain, or advocate on issues illustrated by the footage provided. How-to videos, worksheets, PowerPoint presentations, and other activities lead students step-by step through the process of researching their topic, critically analyzing issues, and creating logical and persuasive arguments and compelling conclusions. Upon completion of their documentaries, students learn valuable leadership and public speaking skills by presenting their projects to classmates or to the general public. The curriculum is flexible and can be completed in as little as 5-7 classroom periods or (including optional activities) over the course of several months. Assessment rubrics and other teacher support materials are provided.

Each DVD contains a complete curriculum and up to three hours of broadcast-quality video footage. Teaching units are designed to support state and national standards. The first five topics (released in November 2011) are: The Water Cycle, California’s Water System, Global Warming, Solar Energy, and Wind Energy.

Take2 is a 501(c)3 nonprofit.

http://www.take2videos.org/

#Take2 #students #education

Post has attachment
Though I am not Buddhist, I was allowed to enter Japan's Mount Koya monastery as an acolyte, to film the lives of the monks from the inside out. I stayed in an ancient wooden temple, its walls made of paper and its floors polished to a high shine from hundreds of years of silent monks slippered feet.

Every morning at 5AM, a monk would beat an enormous bell with a metal mallet until we all scrambled out of bed and gathered for several hours of dedicated chanting. Breakfast was a single bowl of rice and a piece of pickle. The other acolytes and I then set to our main chore scrubbing every inch of the seeming miles of wooden floors and stairs.

I didn't take my video camera out for at least a week. I tried to learn the chants, to sit still and think of nothing, while my eyes wandered to the window and my mind thought, It's 6:10AM, light's falling right across the head monk's face. Great shot.

Ten days into my stay, a Pakistani film crew came through. Like most production teams, they had only two hours to get their footage, so everything was pre-scripted, with story and shots already decided. They focused on our youngest acolyte an 8-year-old boy who chanted obligingly, then went through his chores without ever cracking a smile. I knew exactly what their punch line was going to be that this poor young kid was living a strict and unnatural childhood.

For more information visit http://www.take2videos.org and http://www.japanlandonline.com
#japan #japanland #take2

But I knew Tomo's secret. He was in fact an household name in Japan a champion video game player. The same powers of concentration that he had learned from chanting sutras hour after hour came in handy when he went online for competitions. And, since my room was next to his in the acolytes quarters, I also knew that he had a wall of music CDs, liked to lift weights, and never made his bed. When I did finally start to film his life, my conclusions were a little different from the Pakistani crew. Despite Tomo's rather extraordinary upbringing, he was still just an ordinary kid.


Footage from Tomo and other aspects of Japanese life will soon be available for students to edit through Take 2.
Photo
Photo
Mount Koya Monastery in Japan (2 photos)
2 Photos - View album

Post has attachment
Walking on Air

by Karin Muller

All nonprofit organizations dream of getting a major grant. Problem is, most foundations want you to be able to prove that not only are you performing an extremely important service, but that you can measure your success by the cup, or calorie, or kid. If you happen to run a community swim program, this is easy: kids need to learn to swim so that they don't drown in the local quarry, the way little Tommy did six years ago. And as a result of our program, 23 fifth graders will learn to swim fifty meters in under two minutes.

But how on earth do you measure Global Citizenship? Do you ask students if they know the capital of Sudan? That's geography. Whether they read the papers? Have foreign friends?

Luckily there are experts out there who know how to develop tests to measure almost any outcomes. Unluckily, we can't afford them unless we get a grant, and we can't get a grant unless we hire them.

So here is my outcome measure:

In early 2011, Sudan had elections to determine if the southern half of the country would declare independence. One teacher from a small public school in Illinois wrote to me to say that three parents had clipped articles on the elections from the New York Times and sent them in to class with their kids. She then went on to explain that teenage boys never talk about their school projects with their parents, and that this meant those seventeen-year-olds had not only told their parents, but gotten them fired up enough about it that mom and dad had started following the news on Sudan themselves. And that in this was the first time in thirty years of teaching that she had seen this happen.

Was it enough to get us a grant? I doubt it. Did it make me dance around for a day or two? Hell yes.

#charity #sudan #take2
Wait while more posts are being loaded