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Arthur Navarette
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If We Don't Win - You Don't Pay
If We Don't Win - You Don't Pay

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Landlord to pay $2.13 million in sexual harassment suit
On behalf of Navarette Law Firm posted in Sexual Harassment
    11
    October
    2012
For this blog, we often discuss topics related to sexual harassment in the workplace. Inappropriate and offensive sexual harassing behaviors, however, can be perpetrated against women and men in many settings. Imagine for instance if the individual who is sexually harassing you actually had a key to your apartment.
A California landlord was recently ordered to pay more than $2 million in monetary damages to 25 individuals who are all current and former renters at properties owned and managed by the landlord. In the sexual harassment lawsuit against the man, plaintiffs described various sexually inappropriate and aggressive behaviors carried out by the man. These included touching female tenants without their consent, exposing his genitals to female tenants and making lewd sexual comments and advances.
It was also determined that the man routinely granted or refused housing applications based on gender and sex. It was also determined that he would take adverse actions against female tenants who refused his sexual advances.
The man owns and manages dozens of California rental properties. He has operated as a landlord for more than 30 years and likely carried out sexually harassing behaviors against hundreds of tenants. Thankfully, 25 tenants chose to stand up and fight together to bring an end to the man's despicable behavior. In addition to the monetary compensation owed to the plaintiff's, the man must also hire a property manager to perform his work duties and is not allowed contact with tenants.
Source: Imperial Valley News, "California Landlord Settles Sexual Harassment Lawsuit for $2.13 Million," IVN, Sept. 11, 2012
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EEOC files pregnancy discrimination lawsuits
On behalf of Navarette Law Firm posted in Discrimination
    17
    October
    2012
Today, women make up nearly 50 percent of the American workforce. More and more women are pursing higher education degrees and choosing to earn their own money and work outside of the home. While many workplaces have embraced women workers, sadly some continue to discriminate against women, especially when they become pregnant.
In recent years, reports of discrimination against pregnant employees have increased. In response the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission is taking action and recently filed four separate lawsuits related to pregnancy discrimination.
In one case, a California woman who worked as a security guard was fired from her job while on maternity leave. The woman's employer told her she would be rehired when a position opened. While she waited, however, she learned that several male employees were hired.
As a result of her employer's discriminatory actions, this woman's life has been turned upside down. In the lawsuit, she describes how she needs to work to financially provide for herself and her child and that she has suffered as a result of the undue stress of her current situation.
In another legal matter, a restaurant chain is being sued for firing eight pregnant women. Upon further investigation and questioning of restaurant managers, EEOC investigators learned the company's handbook explicitly instructed managers to fire pregnant employees as company officials believed it "irresponsible in respect to the child's safety" to allow a pregnant woman to continue to work.
These are just two examples of blatant and egregious discrimination against pregnant women. It's important for women who believe they have suffered discrimination by an employer to come forward and speak up. This is especially true when pregnancy discrimination is at issue.
Source: The Huffington Post, "Pregnancy Discrimination In The Workplace Target Of New EEOC Crackdown," Christina Wilkie, Sept. 29, 2012
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