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Janis Selby Jones
146 followers -
Living, learning, and teaching through photography and writing.
Living, learning, and teaching through photography and writing.

146 followers
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Once again, I'm late to join the party, but an app I just discovered is too fun not to share.

Plotagraph+ Photo Animator lets you animate parts of photographs. I'm still learning how to use it effectively, but I was able to animate the clouds in this photo.

Has anyone else given it a try?

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I found this article about presidential doodles is interesting. I wonder if our current president doodles.

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I am sorry that I am late to join Make Cycle 3, but I have been doodling and thinking about doodling all week. One of the things that I have been reflecting upon is the fact that when I bought my first iPad, I was most excited that I could use it for doodling. In fact, one of the first apps I downloaded was a drawing app. I tried several over time (many of them are quite complicated). To become proficient would have required more time than I was willing to devote, but I had fun playing with it. My excitement about doodling on the iPad eventually waned, and I had completely forgotten that it was something that I used to enjoy. Here are a few of my early attempts at iPad doodling. I tried to doodle something new for this make cycle, but found the apps even harder to use than I remembered.
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8/5/17
4 Photos - View album

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The first two Make Cycles inspired me to go to a Drink and Doodle meet up of local artists in a nearby microbrewery last night. The organizing group includes innovative young people who are striving to improve our town by infusing it with the arts. I have volunteered to help with their events for over a year now, but this was my first Drink and Doodle get-together.

When I arrived, many people were already gathered around a large table and were drawing on shared sheets of white butcher paper. With markers, pencils, and pens in hand, artists of all skill levels were doodling flowers, creating characters, and lettering messages. A cup filled with drawing challenges was available for anyone who couldn't think of what to draw and included ideas such as "draw your favorite character as a zombie."

The conversation was lively, and it felt quite natural to join in and draw squiggles on paper while talking with strangers over a beer. I didn't waste any time telling them about CLMOOC and Make Cycles 1 and 2. They were intrigued, and when I handed out plain white postcards, several jumped right in and started creating. I told them that they could draw anything they wanted and that they could write messages for teachers on the back. I also explained that I planned to share their postcards with the CLMOOC community.

Asking the Drink and Doodle group to create postcards was an interesting way for me to connect with them, and it sparked conversations about education, creativity, and the arts that wouldn't have occurred otherwise. Plus, as you can see, I ended up with some pretty cool miniature works of art!

The messages they wrote for you are below:

"Spark a student's imagination and help them see the possibilities. Encouragement goes a long way and carries over into all aspects of life—not just in school."

"Haters gonna hate. Shine on!"

"Teach with your heart and you will never go wrong."

"He stands ready for the world that awaits once he is shown that there is something to stand for."
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7/19/17
8 Photos - View album

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I have been known to be an obsessive doodler, and I have been creating my own "coloring book" pages for as long as I can remember. I was one of those kids who drew in class, and as an adult, I find that doodling helps me concentrate in staff meetings and during professional development sessions. From personal experience, I knew that there were cognitive benefits to doodling long before The Doodle Revolution by Sunni Brown was published.

I used to use crayons, makers, and colored pencils to color in my doodles, and I still do at times, but I've used Photoshop as my main tool since buying my first Apple computer in 1995. My process has remained mostly unchanged for over 20 years now. To create a design, I draw my idea in my sketchbook using an ink pen. I then scan it and clean it up in Photoshop by removing smudges, erasing mistakes, and/or darkening lines. Finally, I use the fill tool to color in the sections. Sometimes, I copy, paste, and rotate to create a pattern as I did with this butterfly design.

I have notebooks filled with drawings stuffed in dresser drawers and stored boxes and tubs in closets throughout my house as well as in the garage. I have files and files of colored drawings saved on my computer. I have a few that I have finished with colored pencils hanging in my home, but I have primarily used them as greeting cards for friends and family. Thank you for the opportunity to share one of my drawings with the CLMOOC community and for nudging me to reflect on and write about my process.
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7/16/17
2 Photos - View album

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