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David Ewing Duncan
Lived in San Francisco, CA
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David Ewing Duncan

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My interview on WGBH... fun!
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David Ewing Duncan

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My latest in the NYT's Sunday Review, on the coming age of medtech enhancements: "How Science Can Build a Better You" http://nyti.ms/WjXNAn
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I better start working on version control for human genome design software.  Also... does this mean we will be able to pick our relatives... eventually?
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David Ewing Duncan

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Below is a feature I wrote for the current issue Discover on new cancer drugs that work amazing well - but only for a few people. Genetics can help us match the right drug to the right person, but this rarely happens. We need more resources spent on what is called "companion diagnostics" to target drugs to the right people. Check it out! 
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Part 2 in my Atlantic column series on the science and implications of radical life extension - based on my new book, www.whenim164.com.
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David Ewing Duncan

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Check out my latest NY Times Sunday Review story, just posted online.
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I like this topic, David. Also, it is now obvious that genetics (our genetic make up) helps/predisposes us to some sports, activities.
For instance, starting with a higher than normal VO2max (oxidative capacity), or more important, responding well to exercise training like cycling: being able to ramp up all the metabolic adaptations allowing our VO2max to reach very high values (critical in cycling, middle and long distance running, cross country running or skiing, rowing, speed skating).
Some polymorphisms (mutations) in the hemoglobin gene (in some individuals) affect the affinity of hemoglobin (oxygen and CO2 carrier in the blood) for oxygen. A higher affinity helps capture oxygen at high altitudes (where oxygen levels/pressure are low). On the other hand, lower affinity helps oxygen leave the blood and get captured by the (working) muscles (where oxygen is used for oxidation of nutrients to 'produce'/extract energy).
Some athletes may find it 'unfair' that others have genes providing  advantages. And they may want to 'compensate' their handicap (which is not allowed by the current World Anti-Doping Code, obviously).
I believe we are all predisposed to something (good at something). People should just choose to do the thing they are good at (sport or other), and be the best at it.
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Now on Byliner...
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Review of "When I'm 164" in SF Chron.
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San Francisco, CA - New York, NY - Nairobi, Kenya - Kansas City, MO - Norwich, VT - Baltimore, MD - Washington, DC - Poughkeepsie, NY - London, UK
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