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Miguel Angel
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Miguel Angel

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In 2003, researchers writing in the American Journal of Medicine discovered something that should change how you think about medical news. They looked at 101 studies published in top scientific journals between 1979 and 1983 that claimed a new therapy or medical technology was very promising. Only five, they found out, made it to market within a decade. Only one (ACE inhibitors, a pharmaceutical drug) was still extensively used at the time of their publication.

One.

But you'd never know that from reading the press.
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Miguel Angel

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LIQUID nitrogen seems a good place to start if you want to cool something down. If Peter Dearman, a British inventor, is correct, it might be even better than it looks. Mr Dearman is a man with a bee in his bonnet. He has dreamed, since he was 15, of making a useful motor powered by liquid nitrogen. Now, at 64, he thinks he has done it—not, as he had originally imagined, to run a car, but to run a refrigerator that promises to be more efficient and less polluting than conventional alternatives.
LIQUID nitrogen seems a good place to start if you want to cool something down. If Peter Dearman, a British inventor, is correct, it might be even better than it...
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Miguel Angel

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The dream for tomorrow’s medicine is to understand the links between DNA and disease — and to tailor therapies accordingly. But scientists working to realize such ‘personalized’ or ‘precision’ medicine have a problem: how to keep genetic data and medical records secure while still enabling the massive, cloud-based analyses needed to make meaningful associations. Now, tests of an emerging form of data encryption suggest that the dilemma can be solved.
Encrypted analysis of data in the cloud would allow secure access to sensitive information.
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Miguel Angel

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A federal appeals court has ruled the National Security Agency’s bulk collection of millions of Americans’ phone records is illegal. The program was exposed by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden; the ACLU filed its lawsuit based largely on Snowden’s revelations. In a unanimous decision Thursday, a three judge panel of the Second Circuit Court of Appeals in New York called the bulk phone records collection "unprecedented and unwarranted." The ruling comes as Congress faces a June 1st deadline to renew the part of the Patriot Act that authorizes the NSA’s bulk data surveillance. Another measure, the USA Freedom Act, would lead to limited reforms of some of the NSA’s programs. We are joined by Jameel Jaffer, Deputy Legal Director of the ACLU, which filed the case challenging the NSA’s bulk collection of American’s phone records
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PyCon 2015
Other people's messy data (and how not to hate it!)
Mali Akmanalp

Have you ever viscerally hated a dataset? Do you want to just get data cleaning out of the way? Are you always left wondering how it consumes most of your time? Whether you work in the sciences, work with government data or scrape websites, data cleaning is a necessary evil. We'll share our woes and check out state of the art in day to day data cleaning tools and strategies.

Slides: http://akmanalp.com/other-peoples-data/#/
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PyCon 2015
Usability Testing on the Cheap
Katie Cunningham - Usability Testing on the Cheap 

While everyone agrees that usability testing should be an important part of your development process, not everyone has enough money laying around to pay for a dedicated team or consultants. In this talk, Katie will review a number of inexpensive options that can help any team deliver a usable product.
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Have him in circles
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Miguel Angel

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Imagine visiting Yellowstone this summer. You wake up before dawn to take a picture of the sunrise over the mists emanating from Yellowstone hot springs. A thunderhead towers above the rising sun, and the picture turns out beautifully. You submit the photo to a contest sponsored by the National Weather Service. Under a statute signed into law by the Wyoming governor this spring, you have just committed a crime and could face up to one year in prison.
Imagine visiting Yellowstone this summer. You wake up before dawn to take a picture of the sunrise over the mists emanating from Yellowstone hot springs. A thunderhead towers above the rising sun, and the picture turns out beautifully. You submit the photo to a contest sponsored by the National Weather...
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pretty sad - two simple words = "open lands"
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Miguel Angel

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P values are an easy target: being widely used, they are widely abused. But, in practice, deregulating statistical significance opens the door to even more ways to game statistics — intentionally or unintentionally — to get a result. Replacing P values with Bayes factors or another statistic is ultimately about choosing a different trade-off of true positives and false positives. Arguing about the P value is like focusing on a single misspelling, rather than on the faulty logic of a sentence.
Ridding science of shoddy statistics will require scrutiny of every step, not merely the last one, say Jeffrey T. Leek and Roger D. Peng.
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Recently, we did an experiment: We took an outdated issue of a respected popular science magazine, Scientific American, and researched exactly what happened to the highly-touted breakthroughs of the era that would supposedly change everything. What we discovered is just how terrible we are at predicting the long arc of scientific discovery.
Recently, we did an experiment: We took an outdated issue of a respected popular science magazine, Scientific American, and researched exactly what happened to the highly-touted breakthroughs of the era that would supposedly change everything. What we discovered is just how terrible we are at predicting the long arc of scientific discovery.
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PyCon 2015
Cutting Off the Internet: Testing Applications that Use Requests
Ian Cordasco

A brief and opinionated view of testing applications and libraries that use requests by a core-developer of requests. You will receive an overview of testing with responses, vcr, httpretty, mock, and betamax.

Slides: https://speakerdeck.com/sigmavirus24/cutting-off-the-internet-testing-applications-that-use-requests-1
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PyCon 2015
What to do when you need crypto
Jarret Raim, Paul Kehrer

The cryptographic world doesn't lend itself to the typical developer flow of learning while doing. Add that to the massive amount of bad or outdated information on the web and many developers are lost or worse, build insecure systems. This tutorial will introduce developers to modern cryptography with an eye towards practical scenarios around password management, encryption and key management.

Github repo: https://github.com/reaperhulk/pycon2015-crypto-tutorial

Excellent tutorial.
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PyCon 2015
Open Source for Newcomers and the People Who Want to Welcome Them
Shauna Gordon-McKeon

Open source can be fun and rewarding, but it can also be intimidating. This talk addresses some of the biggest technical and psychological barriers to contributing, from the perspective of both the newcomers who want to overcome them and the maintainers who want to remove them.
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Have him in circles
1,081 people
Tarun Gehlot's profile photo
Bora Voeun's profile photo
Alan Norden's profile photo
Red Hair's profile photo
Angelica Arias Javier's profile photo
Genadijus Šišanovas (Airmatic)'s profile photo
Lisa Salaz's profile photo
Luis E. Rodríguez's profile photo
Parthiban Raja's profile photo
Basic Information
Gender
Male
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Introduction
Let's see. What am I interested in?

Sciency things:
  • Programming: Scientific computing, algorithms, Data mining, Information retrieval, databases
  • Web development: Front-end development (all that entails, HTML/CSS/Javascript), Python, beginning to be interested in Node.js, Cloud computing
  • Mathematics: Cryptography, Artificial Intelligence, Abstract algebra, Information Theory, Probability, Combinatorics
Other things:

Human rights, Education, Biology, Philosophy, Linguistics, Psychology, Graphic Design.


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