Profile

Cover photo
Miguel Angel
1,071 followers|1,387,890 views
AboutPostsPhotosVideos

Stream

Miguel Angel

Shared publicly  - 
 
For the first time, researchers have found a person in the United States carrying bacteria resistant to antibiotic of last resort, an alarming development that the top U.S. public health official says could signal "the end of the road" for antibiotics.
For the first time, researchers have found a person in the United States carrying bacteria resistant to antibiotics of last resort. CDC chief says this could mean "the end of the road" for antibiotics.
1
Add a comment...

Miguel Angel

Shared publicly  - 
 
Why don't plants get cancer? Carnegie Institution for Science biologist Dominique Bergmann says it's a mystery.
4
Jochen Fromm's profile photo
 
They do, but the tumor is often limited because they have no circulatory system. It is more difficult for plant cells to escape and affect the whole organism.
http://www.nature.com/nrc/journal/v10/n11/full/nrc2942.html
Add a comment...

Miguel Angel

Shared publicly  - 
 
This animation guides us through the immune pathways involved in the disease, from the first signs of self-reactive immune cells to joint damage and other symptoms.
This animation guides us through the immune pathways involved in the disease, from the first signs of self-reactive immune cells to joint damage and other symptoms. This article was reproduced with permission and was first published on January 25, 2016. It is a Nature Video production.
1
Add a comment...

Miguel Angel

Shared publicly  - 
 
Dunning has now conducted a new study with colleagues Stav Atir and Emily Rosenzweig, finding that expertise has its own pitfalls. In a series of experiments conducted at Cornell University, the researchers found that people with greater knowledge in a particular domain were more likely to claim knowledge that they could not possibly know.
The researcher behind the famed Dunning-Kruger Effect has found expertise can lead us to claim impossible knowledge.
5
25
Add a comment...

Miguel Angel

Shared publicly  - 
 
Forecasting is required in many situations. Stocking an inventory may require forecasts of demand months in advance. Telecommunication routing requires traffic forecasts a few minutes ahead. Whatever the circumstances or time horizons involved, forecasting is an important aid in effective and efficient planning.

This textbook provides a comprehensive introduction to forecasting methods and presents enough information about each method for readers to use them sensibly.
Forecasting is required in many situations. Stocking an inventory may require forecasts of demand months in advance. Telecommunication routing requires traffic forecasts a few minutes ahead. Whatever the circumstances or time horizons involved, forecasting is an important aid in effective and ...
1
Add a comment...

Miguel Angel

Shared publicly  - 
 
Warning Signs in Experimental Design and Interpretation. When an experimental study states "The group with treatment X had significantly less disease (p = 1%)", many people interpret this statement as being equivalent to "there is a 99% chance that if I do treatment X it will prevent disease.
1
Add a comment...
Have him in circles
1,071 people
Martin Høgh's profile photo
Sadekur Rahman's profile photo
mustafa sheikh mohamed's profile photo
Tick Tab's profile photo
christian paul “sevenyears” Toledo's profile photo
Jonathan Mowers's profile photo
Matin Azad's profile photo
Heather Hanson's profile photo
Shakeel Aamir (Mullick)'s profile photo

Miguel Angel

Shared publicly  - 
 
Scientists have created a synthetic organism that possesses only the genes it needs to survive. But they have no idea what roughly a third of those genes do.
3
Add a comment...

Miguel Angel

Shared publicly  - 
 
Something must be done to combat this public health hazard. In 2000, the National Heart Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) began requiring that researchers publicly register their research analysis plan before starting their clinical trials. From a new PLOS paper: … Continue reading →
5
10
Add a comment...

Miguel Angel

Shared publicly  - 
 
THE INTERCEPT HAS OBTAINED a secret, internal U.S. government catalogue of dozens of cellphone surveillance devices used by the military and by intelligence agencies. The document, thick with previously undisclosed information, also offers rare insight into the spying capabilities of federal law enforcement and local police inside the United States.
Concerned about the militarization of law enforcement, a source provided The Intercept with a catalogue of surveillance devices, including Stingrays.
1
Add a comment...

Miguel Angel

Shared publicly  - 
 
Why Neurons Have Thousands of Synapses, A Theory of Sequence Memory in Neocortex
Jeff Hawkins, Subutai Ahmad

Neocortical neurons have thousands of excitatory synapses. It is a mystery how neurons integrate the input from so many synapses and what kind of large-scale network behavior this enables. It has been previously proposed that non-linear properties of dendrites enable neurons to recognize multiple patterns. In this paper we extend this idea by showing that a neuron with several thousand synapses arranged along active dendrites can learn to accurately and robustly recognize hundreds of unique patterns of cellular activity, even in the presence of large amounts of noise and pattern variation. We then propose a neuron model where some of the patterns recognized by a neuron lead to action potentials and define the classic receptive field of the neuron, whereas the majority of the patterns recognized by a neuron act as predictions by slightly depolarizing the neuron without immediately generating an action potential. We then present a network model based on neurons with these properties and show that the network learns a robust model of time-based sequences. Given the similarity of excitatory neurons throughout the neocortex and the importance of sequence memory in inference and behavior, we propose that this form of sequence memory is a universal property of neocortical tissue. We further propose that cellular layers in the neocortex implement variations of the same sequence memory algorithm to achieve different aspects of inference and behavior. The neuron and network models we introduce are robust over a wide range of parameters as long as the network uses a sparse distributed code of cellular activations. The sequence capacity of the network scales linearly with the number of synapses on each neuron. Thus neurons need thousands of synapses to learn the many temporal patterns in sensory stimuli and motor sequences.
Abstract: Neocortical neurons have thousands of excitatory synapses. It is a mystery how neurons integrate the input from so many synapses and what kind of large-scale network behavior this enables. It has been previously proposed that non-linear properties of dendrites enable neurons to ...
2
Add a comment...

Miguel Angel

Shared publicly  - 
 
If the p-value is < .05, then the probability of falsely rejecting the null hypothesis is  <5%, right? That means, a maximum of 5% of all significant results is a false-positive (that’s what we control with the α rate).

Well, no. As you will see in a minute, the “false discovery rate” (aka. false-positive rate), which indicates the probability that a significant p-value actually is a false-positive, usually is much higher than 5%.
If the p-value is < .05, then the probability of falsely rejecting the null hypothesis is <5%, right? That means, a maximum of 5% of all significant results is a false-positive (that's what we control with the α rate). Well, no. As you will see in a minute, the “false discovery rate” (aka.
2
Add a comment...

Miguel Angel

Shared publicly  - 
 
Decades of research have shown that humans are so-called cognitive misers. When we approach a problem, our natural default is to tap the least tiring cognitive process. Typically this is what psychologists call type 1 thinking, famously described by Nobel Prize–winning psychologist Daniel Kahneman as automatic, intuitive processes that are not very strenuous.

This is in contrast to type 2 thinking, which is slower and involves processing more cues in the environment. Defaulting to type 1 makes evolutionary sense: if we can solve a problem more simply, we can bank extra mental capacity for completing other tasks. A problem arises, however, when the simple cues available are either insufficient or vastly inferior to the more complex cues at hand.
1
Add a comment...
People
Have him in circles
1,071 people
Martin Høgh's profile photo
Sadekur Rahman's profile photo
mustafa sheikh mohamed's profile photo
Tick Tab's profile photo
christian paul “sevenyears” Toledo's profile photo
Jonathan Mowers's profile photo
Matin Azad's profile photo
Heather Hanson's profile photo
Shakeel Aamir (Mullick)'s profile photo
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Story
Introduction
Let's see. What am I interested in?

Sciency things:
  • Programming: Scientific computing, algorithms, Data mining, Information retrieval, databases
  • Web development: Front-end development (all that entails, HTML/CSS/Javascript), Python, beginning to be interested in Node.js, Cloud computing
  • Mathematics: Cryptography, Artificial Intelligence, Abstract algebra, Information Theory, Probability, Combinatorics
Other things:

Human rights, Education, Biology, Philosophy, Linguistics, Psychology, Graphic Design.


Links