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Esteban Küber
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"Super" Moon Eclipse from San Francisco

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Golden Gate Bridge at Night

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"Super" Moon Eclipse from San Francisco

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"Real life" Disney girls
by Jirka Vinse Jonatan Väätäinen
http://www.jirkavinse.com/
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2015-03-28
12 Photos - View album

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Twitter is looking for a developer advocate for their open source build system, Pants: https://about.twitter.com/careers/positions?jvi=oNCqXfww,Job. Contact me for more details :)

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PgDay Argentina 2014: Call for proposals

The fifth edition of the Argentinian PostgreSQL Day will be held on November 28th in Santa Fe, Argentina (South America):

    http://www.postgresql.org.ar/pgday2014

The International Call for Papers is now open.

Each session will last from 30 to 180 minutes, and may be on any topic related to PostgreSQL.

Presentation language can be English, Spanish or Portuguese.
This year we're looking for talks and hands-on tutorials, specially on migrations from propietary databases, success stories, tools, education, training, etc.

The submission deadline is September 28th, 2014.

Selected speakers will be notified on a rolling basis before the deadline or until all slots were full.

Online proposal submission system:
    http://www.postgresql.org.ar/pgday2014/activity/propose

The fundraising campaign for PGDay 2014 has just started.
There are several opportunities for you to join the advertising (including A/V recording, program guide printing and badge, lanyards, folder/bag, or t-shirt sponsorship).

It is also possible to directly sponsor a speaker for the conference, a meeting room or social events.

The organization is being coordinated by the Argentina PostgreSQL Users Group: arpug@postgresql.org

For details please contact +Martin Marques Martín Marqués, 2014 Event Chair at:

 <martin(at)2ndquadrant(dot)com>

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I normally tell people to calm down when they hear about the outbreak of the latest horrific disease or potential problem or the like. 99% of the time, this is the media getting ahead of itself. After seeing this data about the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, I think we may be seeing the 1% here. As the author of this article puts it:

"I’ve spent enough time around public health people, in the US and in the field, to understand that they prefer to express themselves conservatively. So when they indulge in apocalyptic language, it is unusual, and notable.

When one of the most senior disease detectives in the US begins talking about “plague,” knowing how emotive that word can be, and another suggests calling out the military, it is time to start paying attention."

That is, to put it mildly, alarming. Fortunately, there are concrete suggestions about things which can avert disaster right now: in fact, dealing with situations like this is one of the things the military is best at, and dropping in, establishing large field hospitals, setting up various infection-control protocols, and the like could make the difference between an out-of-control epidemic that ravages the planet and something which ends relatively quickly. 

The graph of most interest is the one on the right, below, showing cases per day in three countries. Sierra Leone seems to be stabilizing slowly; Guinea is showing oscillations, which probably has to do with hospital visitation patterns and waves of panic in the population; but the really scary line is the one from Liberia. You can recognize it as the one that's pointing sharply upwards. This likely has a lot to do with the increasing urbanization of West Africa, as Ebola has a much easier time spreading in dense cities than in small villages.

Given that we are looking at an estimate of 77,000 to 277,000 cases by the end of the year if we don't do anything, and that this could easily lead to mass political instability -- which would then spread Ebola carriers left and right, and turn a regional issue into a global one -- perhaps now would be a really good time for our political leaders to invest in some goddamned catastrophe aversion.

Really, on the priorities list, this is much more likely to be a threat to our governments' (and people's) collective interests than ISIS.  

Via several.

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