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Nick Coghlan
Works at Python Software Foundation
Attended University of Queensland
Lives in Brisbane, Australia
1,381 followers|110,579 views
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Nick Coghlan

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Iain Robertson's profile photo
 
And if I'd known you were staying in the same hotel as me, the same week as me, I'd have aimed to catch up. :)
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Nick Coghlan

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My traditional comment on these: 1-click G+ integration is kinda cheating,  Google.
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Gregory P. Smith's profile photoNick Coghlan's profile photoDirkjan Ochtman's profile photo
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He was making a meta comment while the intent of his post was to share the blog post on G+. (Agreed, he confused me as well)
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Nick Coghlan

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We're well away from the big rivers near Brisbane (the Brisbane River itself through the city, and the Pine Rivers to the north), but still had some decent local flooding.

Most of these pictures are of the local park (which usually has just a small stream running through the middle but had turned into a shallow lake yesterday). The last few pictures/videos are of the far side of the road from the park - the final video is of the inlet side under the bridge that appears in one of the earlier videos.
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Nick Coghlan

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Hmm, popping this up when I hit publish in Blogger is kinda cheating, Google...
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Richard Jones's profile photoJeroen Ruigrok van der Werven's profile photoNick Coghlan's profile photoDavid Kutcher's profile photo
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Julien, catalog-sig is the place to ask those kinds of questions, although PyPI has an open API precisely so that anyone is free to implement their own PyPI competitor that has stricter quality control or other features (see, for example, crate.io).

We're currently in the process of trying to split the build step more cleanly from the install step. Once that's done, then it becomes more feasible to introduce a test hook that can be invoked without installation.
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Nick Coghlan

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+Nick Coghlan and I are having a good brain storming about the addition of password hash algorithms to the Python standard library: http://mail.python.org/pipermail/python-ideas/2012-June/015505.html The discussion is related to the recent #linkedinhacked fiasco. While I was typing, +Guido van Rossum has joined the topic, too.

I'm astonished how few people know about the excellent #passlib package. It's a great framework with over 30 hash algorithms, more deviations for countless apps and OSs, side channel free password checker and migration of outdated password schemas. The code is well written, documented and the authors really know what they are doing.

If you deal with passwords, checkout http://packages.python.org/passlib/
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workoblue workblue's profile photoNick Coghlan's profile photo
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first, even simple tips on Windows platform are helpful to BSD and Linux
users who cross-deploy to Windows.

http://lazyway.blogs.com/lazy_way/2006/02/a_german_milita.html
Lazy Way to Success
four distinct personality types:
1) mentally dull and physically lazy, 
2) mentally bright and physically energetic, 
3) mentally dull and physically energetic, and 
4) mentally bright and physically lazy.

mapping of tasks to types:
1.)[task(simple,  repetitive): type(1)]
2.)[task(complex, repetitive): type(2)]
3.)[task(simple,  do nothing): type(3)]
4.)[task(complex, unique):     type(4)]

Python Software keeps re-inventing itself and even combining
features from functional programming. The task classification
is 4 - complex, unique and YOU specifically are type(4).
     4) mentally bright and physically lazy.

In my personal opinion, you are perfectly matched as in
instance:
     4.)[task(complex, unique):     type(4)]

As long as you are there, Python has a future.
     PYTHON HAS A FUTURE, for it is much more decentralized and global THAN JAVA.

PS. this is NOT to glorify war or the German military.  It is one of
many personality type classifications used in organizations.

PYTHON IS THE PEOPLE. Java was 'the father of Java' and
Sun/Oracle. Python fits the paradigm of complex AND UNIQUE,
even more so than Ruby or Haskell.

PS. Sure OpenBSD is 'more secure', more strict and HIGHLY
COMPLEX.  But  who are the PEOPLE TEAM?
       are there kids making python; engineers making robots;
computer scientists making NEW VERSIONS; programmers
do practical things on the Web???
       The answer is python.

PS. although I like to do type 4; much of time I am stuck with
type 2 - task 2; unable to work with the federation ... (borg in
scifi terms) that is PYTHON.
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Have him in circles
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Nick Coghlan

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Eli Bendersky's profile photo
 
Nice summary, thanks. Re CFFI I really think the two layers (ABI, API) should be viewed separately. While there seems to be general understanding and agreement that the ABI level (for replacing ctypes) is goodness, there's a lot of uncertainty about the API level. As you correctly pointed out yesterday, most folks even within python-committers don't have a clear model of how it works.
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Nick Coghlan

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For comparison with the current set of pics, here are some I took a couple of years ago during the 2011 Brisbane floods.

That bridge Josh is standing on in one of the photos? We couldn't get to it yesterday because the whole park was under water. (I'll grant that it wasn't actually raining when I took these 2011 pics, unlike yesterday)
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Nick Coghlan

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Google making posting this to G+ a one-click operation in Blogger is still cheating...
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Nick Coghlan

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A cache of the entire internet at Google's command, and they can't figure out that suggesting I invite a public mailing list to join Gmail or G+ is really stupid?

And yes, I did just open up G+ for the first time in ages to see python-dev and python-ideas as the first two suggested "Invite Friends" entries :P
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Brett Cannon's profile photoNick Coghlan's profile photo
4 comments
 
Two other pieces of feedback submitted
- there's no gear icon on the Profile page
- the "view post" link down in the bottom left of the notification popup is way to easy to miss, especially when you don't use a maximised window for your browser.
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Have him in circles
1,381 people
Brian Curtin's profile photo
wonko thesane's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Software Engineer
Employment
  • Python Software Foundation
    CPython Core Developer, 2005 - present
  • Red Hat Asia-Pacific
    Senior Software Engineer, 2011 - present
  • Boeing Defence Australia
    <varied>, 1998 - 2011
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Brisbane, Australia
Previously
Brisbane, Australia
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Tagline
CPython core developer, Red Hat toolsmith, cognitive science dabbler.
Introduction
I'm one of the core developers for the CPython reference interpreter, as well as being an erstwhile long range radio communications automation engineer, solar car racing engineer and cognitive science dabbler.

I am currently a member of the Red Hat Engineering Operations team, working on some of the inhouse tools that support development and QA activities for RHEL and other products. In the unlikely event it isn't completely obvious, no I do not speak for Red Hat and all opinions posted online are my own and do not necessarily reflect the official position of my employer.
Bragging rights
Co-author with Guido van Rossum of PEP 343, which added Python's "with statement" syntax and context management protocol
Education
  • University of Queensland
    Computer Systems Engineering, 1996 - 2000
  • University of Queensland
    Arts (Cognitive Science), 1996 - 2000
Basic Information
Gender
Male