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Ian Le Guillou
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Licence approved in the UK to edit genes in human embryos. Although the embryos won't survive beyond a few days, this is still quite a bold move by the HFEA. However it is decisions like this that have let Britain make huge steps in this field from the first 'test tube' baby to mitochondrial transfer.
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Unpublished study of 15 people claims to be able to diagnose Alzheimer's two years in advance with 93% accuracy by testing people's recognition of mountain scenes from a different angle.

If true, could be a very simple and easy test to administer, but I'm sceptical until the study is published and there are larger studies
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Teaching an old drug new tricks

Developing a new drug can take 10 to 15 years and cost up to a billion pounds. Even after that, there is still no guarantee that the drug will work and be approved for use. One promising approach to make this process cheaper and faster is to test existing drugs to see if they have the potential to treat an entirely different disease.

The erectile dysfunction drug tadalafil (Cialis) is now being tested in people at risk of developing vascular dementia:
'The reason the brain cells get damaged in vascular disease is to do with changes in blood supply – small blood vessels are becoming more rigid and narrow. If we could open up these blood vessels and get more blood through them, that could help.'
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Inflammation key to Alzheimer's

"These findings are as close to evidence as we can get to show that this particular pathway is active in the development of Alzheimer's disease," Gomez-Nicola said in a statement. "The next step is to work closely with our partners in industry to find a safe and suitable drug that can be tested to see if it works in humans." The findings also suggest that a diet and lifestyle focused on fighting inflammation could be important in preventing Alzheimer's. The researchers noted, however, that it's too early to make recommendations. Other members of the scientific community are buzzing about the research, calling it "an exciting discovery" and "encouraging."  "With an aging population and no new dementia drugs in over a decade, the need to find treatments that can slow or stop disease progression is greater than ever," Dr. Doug Brown, director of research at Alzheimer's Society, told BBC News.

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A new study looking at the brains of people who died from CJD adds more weight to the idea of the Alzheimer's hallmark protein \amyloid can be transferred through historic medical procedures.

However, none of the people in either study developed Alzheimer's and headlines like this do a lot of damage to the efforts to reduce stigma around dementia.
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UCL are running a free online course on some of the rarer forms of dementia. Sounds like a fantastic resource to hear from some of the world's leading experts on how the diseases develop and affect people.
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Study shows that chimpanzee violence against their own kind is completely natural and not a response to human interference.
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How a trip to the Natural History Museum got me thinking about protein structures.
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After a year of making these images, I'm bowing out. In the past year they've been viewed over 950,000 times and I hope I've done my bit for educating people about animal research. The response to these images has been far greater than I ever thought and it just goes to show the power of visual content that is easily shared among people.
So what does a year of animal research look like? In celebration of our year-anniversary of "This Week in Animal Research" we bring you the following collage.
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Although cancer is a global disease, the challenges in tackling it can be very different.
 
People in more developed countries are more likely to die from lung, breast, colorectal or prostate cancers. Thanks to animal research there have been many new treatments for these diseases, such as tamoxifen or Avastin, which have helped to lower mortality rates over the past 20 years.
 
People in less developed countries are heavily affected by stomach, liver and cervical cancers. These are often caused by infections and could be prevented by vaccines or antibiotics. These treatments have been developed through animal research and as they reach the people who need them most, they will prevent millions of cancer cases.
 
Link to high-res: http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/resources/image-library/1632/two-worlds-of-cancer/
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