Profile cover photo
Profile photo
HKUST Institute for Emerging Market Studies (IEMS)
34 followers -
Provides Thought Leadership on Important Issues Facing Policy Makers and Business Leaders in Emerging Markets
Provides Thought Leadership on Important Issues Facing Policy Makers and Business Leaders in Emerging Markets

34 followers
About
HKUST Institute for Emerging Market Studies (IEMS)'s posts

Post is pinned.Post has attachment
Welcome to the HKUST Institute for Emerging Market Studies' Google+ Page. Please visit us at iems.ust.hk, which is the hub of all the insights and events from the Institute.

#research #emergingmarkets #chinastudies 

Post has attachment
Can robots replace human workers? The Dongguan government wants so, but there have been challenges from all sides. Learn more about this at the upcoming seminar by Huang Yu (HKUST).

Time/date: March 16, 4:00-5:00pm
Location: IAS2042, 2/F, Lo Ka Chung Building, HKUST Campus

For further details, feel free to visit our webpage: http://iems.ust.hk/robots


Post has attachment
Foreign banks have been growing in importance in several emerging market economies and they are expected to play systemically important roles moving forward. Are foreign banks an advantage or impediment? Sasidaran Gopalan, a HKUST IEMS Post-Doctoral Fellow, examines some of the multi-dimensional implications of foreign bank entry in emerging markets the the latest issue of HKUST IEMS Thought Leadership Brief.

Read the brief at http://iems.ust.hk/tlb

https://youtu.be/DUN7eBTusPg


Post has attachment
Prof Tao, University of Hong Kong, explains the key takeaways of the seminar he delivered at HKUST IEMS on how the Sino-Japanese conflicts in 1930s still impact trade and investment between the two countries.

In the hour-long Academic Seminar, Prof Tao discusses how historical animosity still influences international trade and investment despite the trend of globalization. His research team investigates the long-term impact of the Japanese invasion of China from 1937-1945 on cross-border trade and investment. He finds Japanese multinationals are less likely to invest in Chinese regions that suffered greater civilian casualties during the Japanese invasion, and these regions also trade less with Japan.

Watch the full recording of the seminar at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lVWR9FW5zlA&index=3&list=PLDeFPN69Hm7a0I7SVeU0DuDq-NQKQQu50

Find out more about the seminar at http://iems.ust.hk/events/event/enemy-forever-enemy-long-run-impact-japanese-invasion-china-1937-1945-trade-investment/?utm_source=iems&utm_medium=ytube&utm_campaign=acadsem

https://youtu.be/fEBGP5fs_j8



Post has attachment
In the HKUST IEMS Thought Leadership Brief co-authored with Qing Xia, Prof Albert Park, Director of HKUST IEMS, Chair Professor of Social Science and Professor of Social Science Division HKUST, reviews the efficacy of minimum wage policies across BRICS countries–i.e. Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa–highlighting their success or lackthereof as related to critical factors such as labor market coverage, policy enforcement, minimum wage level as compared to mean wages, and others.

Read the Brief at http://iems.ust.hk/thought-leadership-briefs/minimum-wage-policies-affect-workers-emerging-markets/?utm_source=iems&utm_medium=ytube&utm_campaign=tlb

Music credit: Reverie (small theme) by _ghost via http://ccmixter.org/files/_ghost/25389 CC BY 3.0

https://youtu.be/CEk54at7q8o


Post has attachment
Christina Jenq, a post-doctoral researcher with HKUST IEMS and HKUST Jockey Club Institute for Advanced Study, inspects the role of 1990’s era reforms to urban Chinese state-owned enterprises (SOEs) on the widening gender imbalance in urban employment, with males accounting for a significantly larger share of urban employment than females.

Read the Brief at http://iems.ust.hk/featured-news2/the-employment-gender-gap-in-urban-china-why-women-benefited-less-from-chinas-privatization-reforms/?utm_source=iems&utm_medium=ytube&utm_campaign=tlb

https://youtu.be/4-4ecU69p10

Post has attachment
Public perceptions often overlook the solid benefits of #immigration and migrant workers for economic growth. Immigration will become more important as Asian economies start facing population decline. How to balance the equation of labor mobility, public perception and economic growth?

(with Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation APEC, APRU- Association of Pacific Rim Universities )


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7b2eYyvoWDk

#labormobility #migrantworkers 

Post has attachment

Post has attachment
RT @SafiaKhanSA: Ex governor of the central bank in Kenya speaking on the challenges to job creation in Africa #jobs4dev @WorldBank @DPRU_UCT @BIS_org bit.ly/2fHXJK6

Post has attachment
Wait while more posts are being loaded