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Gene Mack
Lives in Guatemala, Guatemala
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Working with wood. #spearguns and #spearfishing . Good music and good friends. Peace  all.
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Here is one I like which my wife Valeria took.
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A few more pics of the marking gauge
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Gene Mack's profile photoBrian Eve's profile photo
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Hi Brian thanks for the comment. The wood is Jocote de Fraile. There is probably another name for it but that is the common name here in Central America.
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Anybody have an idea who made this brace? There is not one marking on it. This was my grandfathers and came from the early 1900's I believe.

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Gene Mack's profile photoBill Dalton's profile photoBen McKee's profile photo
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Thanks for the info. I will do a search on Millers Fall and see what comes up. 
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For all my friends and folks who enjoy spearfishing and woodworking. Hey what is this all about...  
 http://riodulcechisme.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=1010&Itemid=35
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Cayos Belice
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The speargun turned out great. This is the Diablo 131cm gun I completed today. Hopefully the video shows some of the details and lines. 
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Working with wood.   #speargun  and #spearfishing  A before and after. Peace all.
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A #sailfish mother of pearl inlay going into a Diablo 131cm #speargun   #spearfishing  
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A marking gauge I built this morning out of Jocote de Fraile. 
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Thanks Philip. Timothy the wedge works really well and it makes for easy adjustments. I believe some of the Japanese marking gauges use this same principal.
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Just completed a tool chest to help better organize my hand tools. 
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Thanks for the comments. At best this was a napkin sketch of some classic chests I have seen. The carcus is made from Cedro about 12in wide. The carcus sits upon an 8 inch wide skirt of Santa Maria which gives the box extra depth. I lined the bottom with Ormega wood to make the 'flooring'. The 3 sliding drawers are from Mahogany. The lid is a single piece of wood. The outside is rough cut and the inside has been planed smooth. For the life of me the name of the wood has slipped my mind. It's a relatively common wood hear in central america.
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Gene Mack's profile photoDeephunt.net - spearfishing, sport fishing's profile photo
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Here is a little bit about the process of making a Speargun.

Diablo Spearguns are handcrafted from teak and exotic hardwoods in a boutique workshop in Guatemala specializing in quality high-end spearguns. These guns are handmade with pride on a limited basis. 
 The body of the speargun is made from teak. The aged teak lumber is milled into boards of matching dimensions. The strips of wood are hung for a period of time, about 30 days to insure they do not warp.  Depending on the model of the speargun, three to six teak strips with opposing grains are laminated together using epoxy. This process forms a stock that is extremely strong and durable. 
A combination of power and hand tools are used to build each gun.  Power tools such as a jointer and router are used to ‘machine’ a perfectly square and straight stock which is of utmost importance. The router equipped with a ball bit is used to mill a track where the spear shaft will rest. After the track is made a trigger pocket is cut into the stock using a large 13mm bit and squared off with a chisel. Lastly I cut the slot for the power bands using a drill press.
With everything now being completed in the machining process the hand tools come out and the process of forming the shape of the gun starts. The guns I build have lots of curves and have been inspired by both Euro and American style guns. Using hand tools is an extremely satisfying process for me. 
The cutting edges on the tools have to be kept razor sharp. The silica in teak dulls the cutting edges quickly so before starting a project I spend a considerable amount of time sharpening all the tools I’m going to use. 
I have an eclectic mix of both Japanese and western style tools. I use several different types of curved Japanese rosewood hand planes to cut the curves into the gun. A few favorite Lie-Nielsen and Japanese planes also help shape the stock.  
Numerous quality hand cut rasps are used in the shaping process as well.  My Dragon rasps and Iwasaki floats are some of my favorite tools. If you look closely at the shape of the speargun there is a transition area from an American Style gun to a wide and curvy Euro inspired body. Here is where the rasps, floats and rifflers come into play in making that transition.  For me this is a very peaceful process and gives me time to think as I’m slowly shaping the gun. There are no loud saws screaming in the background creating a cloud of dust. Here there is only the feel of the rasp shaving the wood into a form that both looks and feels right. The amount of time I spent taking off .5mm here and there gets insane at times but as mentioned the process is peaceful and enjoyable as I escape into another world. 
The speargun handles are hand carved out of exotic Central American hardwoods such as burled Honduran Rosewood, Bocote, Cocobolo or Jocote de Fraile making each and everyone unique. The wood used for the grips is laminated for strength and beauty. The wooden grips are secured to a stainless steel frame, which in turned in screwed into the stock of the gun. 
From start to finish each speargun has about 25 hours of time invested in it. With this amount of time put into a single gun you can see there is no mass production here.  I believe it is so important for artisans and craftsman to share their knowledge before it is lost in a world of mass production, prefabrication and instant gratification.  I’ve learned so much from so many people and what ever I can give back I will. 
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