Profile cover photo
Profile photo
Chuck Severance
789 followers -
Wrote the book - Sakai: Free as in Freedom (Alpha)
Wrote the book - Sakai: Free as in Freedom (Alpha)

789 followers
About
Chuck's posts

Post has attachment
Chuck Severance commented on a post on Blogger.
I completely agree with Martin's statement about the competitive landscape w.r.t Canvas (as your graphs show). I think both Moodle and Sakai see Canvas as something to compete with when it comes to the quality and value of our product offering, but we don't see market share as the primary indicator of success or failure. Commercial companies with large staffs and widely distributed and expensive sales, marketing, and support teams need to be very careful to match revenue with expenses (or raise funds from investors or debt) so small twitches in market share trends loom large to commercial operations (as well as to the larger Moodle and Sakai Commercial Partners) - but open source is more patient. Angel, WebCT, Pearson and others are long gone from the market whilst Sakai and Moodle abide. If you look even more closely you will see that other open source LMSs like ATutor and OLAT also are abiding lo these many years. As resources levels ebb and flow we simply alter our forward velocity. In five years Schoology might be crushing Canvas in your graphs - and Sakai and Moodle with still be there - making the market fair and making sure our faculty/teachers don't need to go through the pain of switching vendors every 3-5 years when their IT department happens on some new VC-funded bright shiny object in the market.

Post has attachment
Chuck Severance commented on a post on Blogger.
The report summary feels like "click bait" to sell a report that costs money. Saying something in the summary / sales pitch for these kinds of reports that is counter intuitive is a great way to get people to purchase the report just to satisfy their "Huh?" curiosity. Thanks to you and Michael for not playing in that game and actually taking the time to understand what you write about. I wonder if getting a mention from you will increase the revenue for that report :)

Post has attachment
Reconnecting

Post has attachment
Answering questions about the programming courses at University of Information School of Information.

Post has attachment
Chuck Severance commented on a post on Blogger.
Phil, once again a well-thought and balanced article on the topic. Thanks. I would make a couple of observations. I would suggest that the value of an open source community like Sakai and other Apereo projects is that it makes it possible for an organization to control its own destiny. It is too much to expect that the Moodle or Sakai community would somehow guarantee that nothing would ever go wrong with any of the commercial providers. The solution you suggest is more and "better" contracts between the community and its commercial providers. Really? That would not have solved this - there was a solid contract in place that was not met. As you say, had UC Davis hosted their own LMS over these past few years - this would never have happened and there would not be a story at all - they would own their own data all along. Now as they transition to Canvas, their data is just as far away from their own campus control as it was with Scriba. They are depending on Canvas pricing, policies, finances, and longevity, in terms of the long term storage, curation and access to their data for a critical campus IT service. Part of the reason that campus IT organizations want to outsource everything is that they fear some little thing will happen to a locally hosted service and they will get blamed for what they did - even though the ultimate outage of the locally hosted service might be only a few hours and there was never any data at risk - the typical (increasingly gutless) CIOs never want to be responsible for anything - so they outsource thinking that nothing can ever go wrong - it is in the cloud, right? Well - the cloud is just someone else's computer that you don't own and have exactly zero control over. For me what is intriguing was that this is an example of the "outsource everything" strategy that leads to a weakened campus IT organization and one that really can no longer bring talent to bear to directly solve things when they go wrong - they just call the 800 number and hope. The negative consequences of the "best practice" to outsource everything will get worse before it gets better. The good news is that for those who use open source and actually take some responsibility for their campus services, they can avoid all the risks associated with mindless outsourcing.

Post has attachment
Chuck Severance commented on a post on Blogger.
This is indeed a disaster. It was not caused by open source. It was caused by out-sourcing one's IT infrastructure to a company that over the years was sold, and then sold again and ended up in the hands of a private equity firm that apparently no longer has the best interests of its customers as its core purpose. It is a painful reminder that any contract is only as good as the two sides that are signing the contract. It is also a painful reminder that as higher education IT organizations rush to "outsource" their most core functions to others - it does not absolve them of responsibility for campus IT in perpetuity. I worry about a future where campus IT organizations have outsourced all of their IT needs to a myriad of vendors, and after several decades those vendors one by one decide that their cloud business is no longer profitable. I also hope that UC Davis can find a way to recover some of their terrible financial impact from the private equity firm that has caused it.

Post has attachment
Programming for Everybody Capstone on Coursera.

Post has attachment
Chuck Severance commented on a post on Blogger.
I would suggest that you either take Canvas out of the open source category or show that actual fraction of their customers that run the open source version.

Post has attachment
This is a live office hours for the Python for Everybody Coursera Capstone.

Post has attachment
Just some informal office hours for the Coursera Python for Everybody Capstone - from Dr. Chuck's office.
Wait while more posts are being loaded