Profile cover photo
Profile photo
David Linzee
5 followers
5 followers
About
Posts

Post has shared content
One encounters many unfamiliar words and phrases in Middlemarch, partly because of the passage of time since it was written, and partly because of Eliot's formidable erudition. But there is one mysterious term I can clear up right away.
 
On page 776 of our edition, Celia says, "But see, here is my unclemin cog." Baffled, I went to the same page in the Oxford edition, where she says, "But see, here is my uncle coming."
 
It's just a misprint

One encounters many unfamiliar words and phrases in Middlemarch, partly because of the passage of time since it was written, and partly because of Eliot's formidable erudition. But there is one mysterious term I can clear up right away.
 
On page 776 of our edition, Celia says, "But see, here is my unclemin cog." Baffled, I went to the same page in the Oxford edition, where she says, "But see, here is my uncle coming."
 
It's just a misprint

Post has attachment
One encounters many unfamiliar words and phrases in Middlemarch, partly because of the passage of time since it was written, and partly because of Eliot's formidable erudition. But there is one mysterious term I can clear up right away.
 
On page 776 of our edition, Celia says, "But see, here is my unclemin cog." Baffled, I went to the same page in the Oxford edition, where she says, "But see, here is my uncle coming."
 
It's just a misprint

One encounters many unfamiliar words and phrases in Middlemarch, partly because of the passage of time since it was written, and partly because of Eliot's formidable erudition. But there is one mysterious term I can clear up right away.
 
On page 776 of our edition, Celia says, "But see, here is my unclemin cog." Baffled, I went to the same page in the Oxford edition, where she says, "But see, here is my uncle coming."
 
It's just a misprint

It's intriguing, early in the novel, to see how the author introduces characters. I've just read the passage late in book 1 (p. 106) in which she brings on stage plain Mary Garth and contrasts her with beautiful Rosamond. She writes: "Plainness has its peculiar temptations and vices as much as beauty; it is apt to either feign amiability or, not feigning it, to show all the repulsiveness of discontent." I remember reading an Eliot biographer who said that while she herself was plain, she made all her heroines beautiful. Middlemarch begins with a descrption of the beauty of Dorothea. But we can't say that the author thinks a beautiful face means a beautiful soul, since Rosamond is a beauty, too. Nor can we say that beauty makes the path to a happy life easier. We'll just have to await events.
Wait while more posts are being loaded