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Hadrien Gardeur's profile photoNick Aubert's profile photoMac Slocum's profile photoTim O'Brien's profile photo
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Voice interface +Mac Slocum for commands and text. Tablets are now good at consuming content, but not creating it
 
My own wish list revolves around a scenario rather than specific technologies.

I want to be able to toss a tablet, a mouse and a keyboard into my backpack. I'll use the tablet in its default state as a standalone device for consuming content.

When I need to get work done, I'll tell the tablet to connect to the keyboard and mouse. The tablet will automatically know this is "work" mode, so it'll allow for key-command program switching and mouse-based input/editing. In essence, it'll become a mini-laptop.

When I unlink the keyboard and mouse, it goes back to its normal tablet state.

I've toyed with the idea of traveling with my iPad and a bluetooth keyboard, but I know that's not going to cut it. And it's pretty easy to toss my travel machine (MacBook Air) into a backpack.
 
It's going to depend a lot on the tools you need to get your work done, won't it? I'm looking at getting a chromebook to replace my aging netbook, but all I need is a browser and a terminal client. A lot of people's workflows are tied to desktop programs; the MS Office suite in particular. So some of us are almost there already, but it'll be at least a few more years before typical workers can make the transition.
 
It depends on the audience, if we're talking about programmers there is a much higher threshold of utility to cross before this will come to pass. If we're talking about how my mother consumes media and plays the occasional video game? She's already done with laptops.
 
Also +Mac Slocum , six comments on Radar and six comments on Plus. Does't this make you wish that Plus would just hurry up and start hosting comments ala Disqus?
 
+Tim O'Brien A unified / aggregated / agile commenting platform is a Holy Grail I hope to see one day.
 
A very smart man named Alasdair said once, that one thing won't replace another until it can do everything the former can do, and more. (He was speaking specifically of e-readers vs print books, but the idea applies)
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