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Southern Marine Surveying
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Dallas Texas Marine Surveyor
Dallas Texas Marine Surveyor

11 followers
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The out of water portion of the inspection is crucial on bigger vessels because it is vital that the running gear be in good operable condition. Can you spot what is wrong in the above picture? First of all the cotter pin is missing on the prop, there should always be a cotter pin installed on the backing nut to prevent the prop from falling off if the nuts were to back off. Also, if you look closely at the Strut, you will see that the Cutless bearing (shaft bearing) is loose and sticking out about an inch from the strut. This was causing a noticeable vibration at high RPM's and needs to be addressed immediately. Here at Southern Marine Surveying we specialize in pre-purchase boat inspections to give you the information you need to make a well informed purchase.
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Anything look suspicious about this HIN number? The HIN (Hull Identification Number) number on your boat is permanently etched or attached on the starboard aft corner and is required to be put there by all boat manufacturers to identify the boat. Often times when a boat is stolen, the thief will try to change the HIN number so that it cannot be tracked. Always check the HIN number on a prospective boat and compare it to your title to ensure the numbers match, and also to see if there are any tell-tale signs such as this one, that it may have been altered.
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A commercial mariners worst fear offshore is the danger of fire. Ensuring fire extinguishers are ready for use and accounted for, as well as other fire fighting and prevention devices is a top priority onboard commercial ships and boats around the world. The same principle should apply to your own personal boat. Take the time to routinely inspect your fire extinguishers to ensure they are full on the gauges, not expired and securely mounted in readily accessible locations such as the galley and helm station. An onboard fire can be a very scary and even deadly situation. Make sure you are properly prepared so you can respond quickly and efficiently.
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If you look closely at the picture, you will see there are hundreds of small blisters the size of a dime/ nickel. The only way to truly fix the blistering at this point is to peel the gelcoat and let the hull dry. There are other ways of fixing the blisters but chances are this will be a re-occurring problem unless fixed right the first time. Regular hull bottom maintenance and application of barrier/bottom paint will help prevent this.
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Gelcoat damage like this is cosmetic in nature, but can be expensive to repair. When you buy a boat out of state and cannot see the boat in person, you are relying on the surveyor to be your eyes and ears. We meticulously examine the hull and photograph it with a high resolution camera to give you a thorough, non-biased representation of the boat's current condition, so you can make a well informed decision.
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Oftentimes boat owners will unplug their CO detectors because they can be annoying when they falsely alarm. This is a bad idea for multiple reasons. It is not uncommon to read about people dying of Carbon Monoxide poisoning, and its truly tragic because it is usually the same story, a family is spending the night on their boat with the generator running, CO fumes make their way into the cabin and the unsuspecting occupants perish in their sleep. A simple way to avoid this is by testing your CO detectors EVERY time you use your boat. On the Fireboy Xintex in the picture above, there is a button the side you can press which will activate a self test. It's vitally important to you and your friends/family's safety to ensure all your CO detectors are plugged in and operating properly. If your boat doesn't have one, consider it, you can never be too safe.
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Buying a boat out of state can be nerve wracking because you can't actually see the boat in person. Here at Southern Marine Surveying, we understand that and know how it feels to have to rely on a surveyor to be your eyes and ears. Because of this we take extra steps to ensure you are informed and have all the information you need to make a good purchase, like taking 200-300 high resolution pictures from every angle of the boat, and taking videos of the sea-trial so you can actually see the boat operate. Next time you are buying a boat, hire us to professionally appraise and inspect it beforehand.

www.southernmarinesurveying.com
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A raw water through-hull is basically a hole in the bottom of your boat with a bronze (or marelon) valve (seacock) that allows water from the lake (or ocean) to be used to cool the engine, provide water for the air conditioner, toilet, generator, etc etc. It's extremely important to maintain seacocks and the attached hose in order to prevent water from filling the boat and possibly sinking it in the event a hose comes off or other issue. This is why you should periodically inspect hoses to ensure there are no cracks like in the above picture, and to make sure they are double clamped at each connection. You should also periodically exercise the valve handle to ensure it is operating smoothly, and will allow quick closure in the event of an emergency. Familiarize yourself with all through-hull seacock valves so that you can be prepared to quickly shut off the flow of water and prevent a sinking in an emergency situation.
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In this picture we have a fuel tank inlet on a plastic fuel tank that has been "repaired." Not only is there no hose clamp on the fuel hose, but the "new" fuel inlet has no anti-siphon valve. Additionally, since a new hole was tapped into the tank, the pressure test (when it was manufactured) is now invalid, unless a new test was performed. Finally, we can see there is a glob of jb weld putty, and some kind of epoxy used to hold the barb in place. This is just plain wrong, and has a high potential for failure/leakage.
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A broken deck hatch like this is usually the result of someone stepping on it. A new hatch can cost upwards of 1,000$ and they are important to maintain to prevent water from intruding into the fiberglass or cabin. We always inspect the hatches to ensure they are not cracked or leaking water, and that the struts properly operate. This might seem minor to the average boat owner, until the repair bill comes. Parts like this can be very expensive. Hire a marine surveyor to do a thorough examination of the boat and let you know about issues like this before you buy it.
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