Profile

Cover photo
Kyva Go
4 followers|14,427 views
AboutPostsPhotosYouTube

Stream

Kyva Go

Down With Pandas  - 
 
Alex Jordan, Hanna Kokko and Michael Kasumovic
show experimental results that males are choosy, but for completely different reasons than females. Choice is a consequence of being forced away from what they prefer rather than the concern about mating with the wrong mate.

The results also help to explain another biological conundrum — the existence of competitively inferior males. They show that their genes are propagated in populations because they choose to mate with less preferred females.
Males will mate with anything. Well, that is the general view, one that exists because of a simple biological underpinning: females are reproductively limited by costly gestation, while males are only…
1
Add a comment...

Kyva Go

Down With Pandas  - 
 
A group of international scientists have completed the first global inventory of flu strains in birds by reviewing more than 50 published studies and genetic data, providing new insight into the drivers of viral diversity and the emergence of disease that can ultimately impact human health and livelihoods.
The research, published in the journal PLOS ONE and performed as part of the USAID PREDICT project, identified over 116 avian flu strains in wild birds. This is roughly twice the number that were found in domestic birds, and more than ten times the number found in humans.

The authors introduced a new method of identifying health risks, which borrows on approaches used by ecologists, to estimate the diversity of flu viruses in a particular location. With this approach, health authorities can design surveillance programs to detect a given percentage of flu virus diversity.
The scientists also looked at patterns of flu diversity in different bird hosts. Mallards carry the highest number of strains at 89 and ruddy turnstones were second with 45. The more a strain was shared across wild bird types, the more likely it was to be found in domestic birds, a risk factor for spillover events. They also noted that some strains could be specific to certain bird types. For example, gulls and shorebirds (Charadriiformes) carried ten strains that have not been identified in any other bird order.

According to Dr. Olson, "This inventory isn't about blaming wild birds, but it allows us to map what we know, and informs our understanding of what drives viral diversity and the emergence of rare viral strains that can infect people. Given that flu viruses can jump from domestic poultry to people, ongoing efforts at improving biosecurity at poultry farms and markets remain key to outbreak prevention."
1
Add a comment...

Kyva Go

World Robot Domination  - 
 
Recent projects at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory that have built on Sketch include a system for automatically grading programming assignments for computer science classes, a system that converts hand-drawn diagrams into code, and a system that produces SQL database queries from code written in Java.

At this year's Verification, Model Checking, and Abstract Interpretation Conference, Solar-Lezama and a group of his students — grad students Rohit Singh, Rishabh Singh, and Zhilei Zu, along with MIT senior Rebecca Krosnick — described a new elaboration on Sketch that, in many cases, enables it to handle complex synthesis tasks much more efficiently.

The researchers tested the new version of Sketch on several existing applications, including the automated grading system. In cases where the previous version would "time out," or take so long to reach a solution that it simply gave up, the new version was able to correct students' code in milliseconds.
1
Add a comment...

Kyva Go

Down With Pandas  - 
 
The findings suggest that voice areas evolved at least 100 million years ago, the age of the last common ancestor of humans and dogs, the researchers say. It also offers new insight into humans' unique connection with our best friends in the animal kingdom and helps to explain the behavioral and neural mechanisms that made this alliance so effective for tens of thousands of years.

The study is the first step toward understanding how it is that dogs can be so remarkably good at tuning into the feelings of their human owners.
1
Kyva Go's profile photo

Kyva Go

Discussion  - 
 
Both Mathew Kearns and Rod Lambert recently suggested we should reconsider how we talk about science if we really want an engaged public. They also separately argue it is time to embrace debate and disagreement, and accept the inherently social and cultural aspects of science.
Polling on attitudes to particular areas of science probably shouldn’t be driving policy. We need to dig deeper into the social contexts where there is disagreement about how science and technology functions.
2
1
Elizabeth Whitmire's profile photo
Add a comment...
Have him in circles
4 people

Kyva Go

Prehistorical Peculiarities  - 
 
Certain geological environments, such as hydrothermal vents can be considered as 'environmental fuel cells', since electrical energy can be generated from redox reactions between hydrothermal fuels and seawater oxidants, such as oxygen. Indeed, last year researchers in Japan demonstrated that electrical power can be harnessed from these vents in a deep-sea experiment in Okinawa.

In the new study, the researchers have demonstrated a proof of concept for their fuel cell model of the emergence of cell metabolism on Earth.

In the Energy Leeds Renewable Lab at the University of Leeds and NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the team replaced traditional platinum catalysts in fuel cells and electrical experiments with those composed of geological minerals.

Dr Laura Barge from the NASA Astrobiology Institute 'Icy Worlds' team at JPL in California, US, and lead author of the paper, said: "Certain minerals could have driven geological redox reactions, later leading to a biological metabolism. We're particularly interested in electrically conductive minerals containing iron and nickel that would have been common on the early Earth."

Iron and nickel are much less reactive than platinum. However, a small but significant power output successfully demonstrated that these metals could still generate electricity in the fuel cell – and hence also act as catalysts for redox reactions within hydrothermal vents in the early Earth.

For now, the chemistry of how geological reactions driven by inanimate rocks and minerals evolved into biological metabolisms is still a black box. But with a laboratory-based model for simulating these processes, scientists have taken an important step forward to understanding the origin of life on this planet and whether a similar process could occur on other worlds.
1
Add a comment...

Kyva Go

Medical Science  - 
 
The NHS and the Daily Telegraph report on two studies (original and repeat duplicating results) in Estonia and Finland which predict whether an apparently healthy human will likely die within 5 years.

The four biomarkers that appeared to determine risk of mortality in the next five years were: alpha-1-acid glycoprotein – a protein that is raised during infection and inflammation; albumin – a protein that carries vital nutrients, hormones and proteins in the bloodstream; very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) particle size – usually known for being 'very bad' cholesterol; and citrate – a compound that is an essential part of the body's metabolism. Researchers found that people in the top 20% of the summary score range were 19 times more at risk of dying in the next five years than people in the lowest 20%."

The NHS's summary of the news points out that "the implications of such a test are unclear. As this was an observational study, it can only show an association between the biomarkers and risk of death. It does not predict what the underlying cause of death would be for an individual and does not therefore provide an answer in terms of treatment.
1
Add a comment...
 
Scientists previously had detected water vapor on a handful of other planets, using a technique that works only if a planet has an orbit that passes it in front of its star, when viewed from Earth. Scientists also were able to use another imaging technique that works only if the planet is sufficiently far away from its host star. However, significant portions of the population of extrasolar planets do not fit either of these criteria, and there had not been a way to discover information about the atmospheres of these planets.


IMAGE: Water has been detected in the atmosphere of a planet outside our solar system with a new technique that could help researchers to learn how many planets with water, like...
Click here for more information.
"We now are applying our effective new infrared technique to several other non-transiting planets orbiting stars near the Sun," Bender said. "These planets are much closer to us than the nearest transiting planets, but largely have been ignored by astronomers because directly measuring their atmospheres with previously existing techniques was difficult or impossible." With the new detection technique and more-powerful future telescopes such as the James Webb Space Telescope and the Thirty Meter Telescope, the astronomers expect to be able to examine the atmospheres of planets that are much cooler and more distant from their host stars, where liquid water is even more likely to exist.

Bender is leading a larger project to characterize the atmospheres of many hot-Jupiter extrasolar planets. The tau Boötis discovery is one subcomponent of this larger project. The data analysis and publication of the tau Boötis discovery was led by Alexandra Lockwood at Caltech as part of her thesis with her advisor Geoffrey Blake, Professor of Cosmochemistry and Planetary Sciences and Professor of Chemistry at Caltech, and much of the initial data reduction for this discovery was carried out by Alexander Richert, a Penn State graduate student.
1
Add a comment...

Kyva Go

Down With Pandas  - 
 
Scientists have found for the first time an infectious form of the cat parasite TOXOPLASMA GONDII in western Arctic Beluga, prompting a health advisory to the Inuit people who eat whale meat.
"Ice is a major eco-barrier for pathogens," says Michael Grigg, a molecular parasitologist with the U.S. National Institutes of Health and an adjunct professor at UBC. "What we're seeing with the big thaw is the liberation of pathogens gaining access to vulnerable new hosts and wreaking havoc."

Toxoplasmosis, also known as kitty litter disease, is the leading cause of infectious blindness in humans and can be fatal to fetuses and to people and animals with compromised immune systems.
1
Add a comment...

Kyva Go

Spacey News  - 
 
The composition of the newly discovered star shows it formed in the wake of a primordial star, which had a mass 60 times that of our Sun.

"To make a star like our Sun, you take the basic ingredients of hydrogen and helium from the Big Bang and add an enormous amount of iron – the equivalent of about 1,000 times the Earth's mass," Dr Keller says.

"To make this ancient star, you need no more than an Australia-sized asteroid of iron and lots of carbon. It's a very different recipe that tells us a lot about the nature of the first stars and how they died."

Dr Keller says it was previously thought that primordial stars died in extremely violent explosions which polluted huge volumes of space with iron. But the ancient star shows signs of pollution with lighter elements such as carbon and magnesium, and no sign of pollution with iron.

"This indicates the primordial star's supernova explosion was of surprisingly low energy. Although sufficient to disintegrate the primordial star, almost all of the heavy elements such as iron, were consumed by a black hole that formed at the heart of the explosion," he says.

The result may resolve a long-standing discrepancy between observations and predictions of the Big Bang.
1
Add a comment...
People
Have him in circles
4 people
Links
YouTube
Other profiles
Contributor to
Basic Information
Gender
Male