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Flying Whale Studios
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Edition-limited, photographic fine art
Edition-limited, photographic fine art

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Horses, and rabbits and sheep. Oh my!

Once, when I was out in the garden weeding, a gentleman stopped and asked what we used to feed our plants. When I replied "horse manure," he scoffed.

"Rabbit is what you need," he told me. "My father swore by it." 

Before I could respond, he adjusted his hat and told me: "You need to get your hands on some rabbit pellets." And off he walked.

I haven't seen him since, but clearly his words keep coming back.

I've also read that sheep manure is an excellent option. Drier, less odiferous, high in phosphorous and potassium.

Unfortunately, we don't know anyone who raises either. They're around, I'm sure, but you have to know someone well or be introduced by a reputable party before you start asking to take poo off their hands.

Years ago, we knew a lady who raised ostriches and had friends who raised emus. Back then, we weren't as serious about gardening. A pity. Today, I'd welcome an opportunity to give these avian manures a try.

Like so many things in life, diversity and moderation are probably the essential ingredients when it comes to manure. 

For now, we'll stick to composted horse manure because we have a steady source and it's done wonders to transform our century-old lawn. But if we can get our hands on rabbit or sheep, we won't say no!

- Mary

Mary and Kevin, have created an edible landscape garden on their half-acre property in the city of Geneva, NY. Follow their progress online.
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Post has shared content
Horses, and rabbits and sheep. Oh my!

Once, when I was out in the garden weeding, a gentleman stopped and asked what we used to feed our plants. When I replied "horse manure," he scoffed.

"Rabbit is what you need," he told me. "My father swore by it." 

Before I could respond, he adjusted his hat and told me: "You need to get your hands on some rabbit pellets." And off he walked.

I haven't seen him since, but clearly his words keep coming back.

I've also read that sheep manure is an excellent option. Drier, less odiferous, high in phosphorous and potassium.

Unfortunately, we don't know anyone who raises either. They're around, I'm sure, but you have to know someone well or be introduced by a reputable party before you start asking to take poo off their hands.

Years ago, we knew a lady who raised ostriches and had friends who raised emus. Back then, we weren't as serious about gardening. A pity. Today, I'd welcome an opportunity to give these avian manures a try.

Like so many things in life, diversity and moderation are probably the essential ingredients when it comes to manure. 

For now, we'll stick to composted horse manure because we have a steady source and it's done wonders to transform our century-old lawn. But if we can get our hands on rabbit or sheep, we won't say no!

- Mary

Mary and Kevin, have created an edible landscape garden on their half-acre property in the city of Geneva, NY. Follow their progress online.

Post has shared content
Horses, and rabbits and sheep. Oh my!

Once, when I was out in the garden weeding, a gentleman stopped and asked what we used to feed our plants. When I replied "horse manure," he scoffed.

"Rabbit is what you need," he told me. "My father swore by it." 

Before I could respond, he adjusted his hat and told me: "You need to get your hands on some rabbit pellets." And off he walked.

I haven't seen him since, but clearly his words keep coming back.

I've also read that sheep manure is an excellent option. Drier, less odiferous, high in phosphorous and potassium.

Unfortunately, we don't know anyone who raises either. They're around, I'm sure, but you have to know someone well or be introduced by a reputable party before you start asking to take poo off their hands.

Years ago, we knew a lady who raised ostriches and had friends who raised emus. Back then, we weren't as serious about gardening. A pity. Today, I'd welcome an opportunity to give these avian manures a try.

Like so many things in life, diversity and moderation are probably the essential ingredients when it comes to manure. 

For now, we'll stick to composted horse manure because we have a steady source and it's done wonders to transform our century-old lawn. But if we can get our hands on rabbit or sheep, we won't say no!

- Mary

Mary and Kevin, have created an edible landscape garden on their half-acre property in the city of Geneva, NY. Follow their progress online.

Post has shared content
Horses, and rabbits and sheep. Oh my!

Once, when I was out in the garden weeding, a gentleman stopped and asked what we used to feed our plants. When I replied "horse manure," he scoffed.

"Rabbit is what you need," he told me. "My father swore by it." 

Before I could respond, he adjusted his hat and told me: "You need to get your hands on some rabbit pellets." And off he walked.

I haven't seen him since, but clearly his words keep coming back.

I've also read that sheep manure is an excellent option. Drier, less odiferous, high in phosphorous and potassium.

Unfortunately, we don't know anyone who raises either. They're around, I'm sure, but you have to know someone well or be introduced by a reputable party before you start asking to take poo off their hands.

Years ago, we knew a lady who raised ostriches and had friends who raised emus. Back then, we weren't as serious about gardening. A pity. Today, I'd welcome an opportunity to give these avian manures a try.

Like so many things in life, diversity and moderation are probably the essential ingredients when it comes to manure. 

For now, we'll stick to composted horse manure because we have a steady source and it's done wonders to transform our century-old lawn. But if we can get our hands on rabbit or sheep, we won't say no!

- Mary

Mary and Kevin, have created an edible landscape garden on their half-acre property in the city of Geneva, NY. Follow their progress online.

Post has shared content
Horses, and rabbits and sheep. Oh my!

Once, when I was out in the garden weeding, a gentleman stopped and asked what we used to feed our plants. When I replied "horse manure," he scoffed.

"Rabbit is what you need," he told me. "My father swore by it." 

Before I could respond, he adjusted his hat and told me: "You need to get your hands on some rabbit pellets." And off he walked.

I haven't seen him since, but clearly his words keep coming back.

I've also read that sheep manure is an excellent option. Drier, less odiferous, high in phosphorous and potassium.

Unfortunately, we don't know anyone who raises either. They're around, I'm sure, but you have to know someone well or be introduced by a reputable party before you start asking to take poo off their hands.

Years ago, we knew a lady who raised ostriches and had friends who raised emus. Back then, we weren't as serious about gardening. A pity. Today, I'd welcome an opportunity to give these avian manures a try.

Like so many things in life, diversity and moderation are probably the essential ingredients when it comes to manure. 

For now, we'll stick to composted horse manure because we have a steady source and it's done wonders to transform our century-old lawn. But if we can get our hands on rabbit or sheep, we won't say no!

- Mary

Mary and Kevin, have created an edible landscape garden on their half-acre property in the city of Geneva, NY. Follow their progress online.

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Horses, and rabbits and sheep. Oh my!

Once, when I was out in the garden weeding, a gentleman stopped and asked what we used to feed our plants. When I replied "horse manure," he scoffed.

"Rabbit is what you need," he told me. "My father swore by it." 

Before I could respond, he adjusted his hat and told me: "You need to get your hands on some rabbit pellets." And off he walked.

I haven't seen him since, but clearly his words keep coming back.

I've also read that sheep manure is an excellent option. Drier, less odiferous, high in phosphorous and potassium.

Unfortunately, we don't know anyone who raises either. They're around, I'm sure, but you have to know someone well or be introduced by a reputable party before you start asking to take poo off their hands.

Years ago, we knew a lady who raised ostriches and had friends who raised emus. Back then, we weren't as serious about gardening. A pity. Today, I'd welcome an opportunity to give these avian manures a try.

Like so many things in life, diversity and moderation are probably the essential ingredients when it comes to manure. 

For now, we'll stick to composted horse manure because we have a steady source and it's done wonders to transform our century-old lawn. But if we can get our hands on rabbit or sheep, we won't say no!

- Mary

Mary and Kevin, have created an edible landscape garden on their half-acre property in the city of Geneva, NY. Follow their progress online.
Add a comment...

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Space Concerns

At the height of summer, when the to-do list stretches interminably before us, I'm convinced half an acre of mixed-use garden is more than we can handle. Especially when you throw in an art business and a full-time job .... There's just not enough time!

But when I'm browsing seed and nursery catalogs, I start wishing we had just a little bit more space. As it is, for our miniature orchard in back of the house, we have our work cut out for ourselves each March as we prune full-size apple, cherry, pear and plum trees to manageable 12-foot heights. Standard-size trees have better root systems, making them better able to withstand drought and stave off stress/disease, but above ground, our babies need to be closer to dwarf/semi-dwarf size.

But if space weren't an issue ...

I'd plant hickory and pecan trees so we could have a variety of sweet nuts, not just almond and cursed black walnuts.
... Mulberry and elderberry bushes for jam and juice
... Concord and other easy-care labrusca grapes for juice and pies
... Enough sweet corn so we could freeze our own
... Enough popcorn to get us through the winter and all those batches of addictive caramel corn we give as gifts
... Grain corn, because the blue and red and other multi-color exotic varieties sound fun and delicious
... All the paste tomatoes I could find to compare the flavors ourselves and see which made the best sauce
... Beans in all the colors of the rainbow

For fleeting moments, I consider buying some of these seeds/shrubs/trees and asking to plant them on my brother's farm. After all, with nearly 150 acres, lack of space is the least of his concerns.

But, then we'd need to drive there regularly to tend our long-distance babies, and I realize: where would we find the time?

- Mary

Mary and Kevin, have created an edible landscape garden on their half-acre property in the city of Geneva, NY. Follow their progress online at http://www.flyingwhalestudios.com/1/post/2014/01/space-concerns.html

Post has shared content

Space Concerns

At the height of summer, when the to-do list stretches interminably before us, I'm convinced half an acre of mixed-use garden is more than we can handle. Especially when you throw in an art business and a full-time job .... There's just not enough time!

But when I'm browsing seed and nursery catalogs, I start wishing we had just a little bit more space. As it is, for our miniature orchard in back of the house, we have our work cut out for ourselves each March as we prune full-size apple, cherry, pear and plum trees to manageable 12-foot heights. Standard-size trees have better root systems, making them better able to withstand drought and stave off stress/disease, but above ground, our babies need to be closer to dwarf/semi-dwarf size.

But if space weren't an issue ...

I'd plant hickory and pecan trees so we could have a variety of sweet nuts, not just almond and cursed black walnuts.
... Mulberry and elderberry bushes for jam and juice
... Concord and other easy-care labrusca grapes for juice and pies
... Enough sweet corn so we could freeze our own
... Enough popcorn to get us through the winter and all those batches of addictive caramel corn we give as gifts
... Grain corn, because the blue and red and other multi-color exotic varieties sound fun and delicious
... All the paste tomatoes I could find to compare the flavors ourselves and see which made the best sauce
... Beans in all the colors of the rainbow

For fleeting moments, I consider buying some of these seeds/shrubs/trees and asking to plant them on my brother's farm. After all, with nearly 150 acres, lack of space is the least of his concerns.

But, then we'd need to drive there regularly to tend our long-distance babies, and I realize: where would we find the time?

- Mary

Mary and Kevin, have created an edible landscape garden on their half-acre property in the city of Geneva, NY. Follow their progress online at http://www.flyingwhalestudios.com/1/post/2014/01/space-concerns.html

Post has shared content

Space Concerns

At the height of summer, when the to-do list stretches interminably before us, I'm convinced half an acre of mixed-use garden is more than we can handle. Especially when you throw in an art business and a full-time job .... There's just not enough time!

But when I'm browsing seed and nursery catalogs, I start wishing we had just a little bit more space. As it is, for our miniature orchard in back of the house, we have our work cut out for ourselves each March as we prune full-size apple, cherry, pear and plum trees to manageable 12-foot heights. Standard-size trees have better root systems, making them better able to withstand drought and stave off stress/disease, but above ground, our babies need to be closer to dwarf/semi-dwarf size.

But if space weren't an issue ...

I'd plant hickory and pecan trees so we could have a variety of sweet nuts, not just almond and cursed black walnuts.
... Mulberry and elderberry bushes for jam and juice
... Concord and other easy-care labrusca grapes for juice and pies
... Enough sweet corn so we could freeze our own
... Enough popcorn to get us through the winter and all those batches of addictive caramel corn we give as gifts
... Grain corn, because the blue and red and other multi-color exotic varieties sound fun and delicious
... All the paste tomatoes I could find to compare the flavors ourselves and see which made the best sauce
... Beans in all the colors of the rainbow

For fleeting moments, I consider buying some of these seeds/shrubs/trees and asking to plant them on my brother's farm. After all, with nearly 150 acres, lack of space is the least of his concerns.

But, then we'd need to drive there regularly to tend our long-distance babies, and I realize: where would we find the time?

- Mary

Mary and Kevin, have created an edible landscape garden on their half-acre property in the city of Geneva, NY. Follow their progress online at http://www.flyingwhalestudios.com/1/post/2014/01/space-concerns.html

Post has shared content

Space Concerns

At the height of summer, when the to-do list stretches interminably before us, I'm convinced half an acre of mixed-use garden is more than we can handle. Especially when you throw in an art business and a full-time job .... There's just not enough time!

But when I'm browsing seed and nursery catalogs, I start wishing we had just a little bit more space. As it is, for our miniature orchard in back of the house, we have our work cut out for ourselves each March as we prune full-size apple, cherry, pear and plum trees to manageable 12-foot heights. Standard-size trees have better root systems, making them better able to withstand drought and stave off stress/disease, but above ground, our babies need to be closer to dwarf/semi-dwarf size.

But if space weren't an issue ...

I'd plant hickory and pecan trees so we could have a variety of sweet nuts, not just almond and cursed black walnuts.
... Mulberry and elderberry bushes for jam and juice
... Concord and other easy-care labrusca grapes for juice and pies
... Enough sweet corn so we could freeze our own
... Enough popcorn to get us through the winter and all those batches of addictive caramel corn we give as gifts
... Grain corn, because the blue and red and other multi-color exotic varieties sound fun and delicious
... All the paste tomatoes I could find to compare the flavors ourselves and see which made the best sauce
... Beans in all the colors of the rainbow

For fleeting moments, I consider buying some of these seeds/shrubs/trees and asking to plant them on my brother's farm. After all, with nearly 150 acres, lack of space is the least of his concerns.

But, then we'd need to drive there regularly to tend our long-distance babies, and I realize: where would we find the time?

- Mary

Mary and Kevin, have created an edible landscape garden on their half-acre property in the city of Geneva, NY. Follow their progress online at http://www.flyingwhalestudios.com/1/post/2014/01/space-concerns.html
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