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Lahijan is a Caspian sea resort in and the ‪#‎capital‬ of ‪#‎Lahijan‬ County, Gilan Province, ‪#‎Iran‬.
The resort Lahijan has both traditional and modern architecture. The town, which has an Iranian-European urban structure, lies on the northern slope of the Alborz mountains. Its culture and climatic favorable condition have made Lahijan a major tourist hub in northern Iran. The city is basically founded on the sediments remaining from big rivers in Gilan, including the Sefid-Rud (White River). Historically, the city was the major business center and of course the capital of East Gilan during the time of special rulers. Lahijan has also been a tourism hub of the Islamic world during different eras in Iran's history.


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Iranians gear up for Persian New Year

Iranians all over the world are gearing up to celebrate the joyful spirit of spring marked by the start of Persian New Year, called Nowruz. 

Nowruz, which means New Day, is the first day of the Persian calendar month of Farvardin. The day usually falls on March 20 but in leap years, it coincides with March 21. 

In Iran and many other countries people welcome spring with the ancient Nowruz celebrations such as visiting their relatives and friends, going on trips and spending time in nature.

The festive occasion is one of the most ancient and most cherished festivities which has been celebrated for at least 3,000 years. 

In Iran, people prepare to welcome the New Year days before by doing spring cleaning, decorating their homes and buying new clothes. For Iranians, Nowruz is a celebration of renewal and change.

The eve of the last Wednesday of the year is celebrated by Iranian worldwide as Chaharshanbeh Suri or the Red Wednesday.

On this day, people make bonfires in public and jump over the flames and light fireworks saying 'my yellowness is yours, your redness is mine,' telling the fire to take their pain, sickness and give them its strength, warmth and health. Mixed nuts and berries are also served during the celebration.

After celebrating the national festival of fire, Iranians mark Nowruz by setting the Haft Seen, a table with seven items starting with the Persian /s/ sound. 

The items usually include Sabzeh (freshly grown greens), Samanu (a sweet pudding made from germinated wheat), Senjed (the dried fruit of the oleaster tree), Seeb (apple), Seer (garlic), Somagh (sumac) and Serkeh (vinegar).

People also put the holy Qur'an next to the main Haft Seen items in hopes of being blessed by God in the year ahead.

The mirror (symbolizing cleanliness and honesty), a bowl of water with goldfish, decorated eggs (symbolizing fertility) sometimes one for each member of the family, candles (enlightenment and sunrise), coins (representing wealth), dried nuts and fruits and Sonbol (hyacinth) are also among the items Iranians include in their Haft Seen.

The whole table is a thanksgiving table for all the good bestowed by God, and symbolizes light, warmth, life, love, joy, production, prosperity and nature.

Zoroastrians celebrate the birth anniversary of Prophet Zoroaster on the sixth day of Nowruz holidays which falls on March 26.

Nowruz festivities continue for 12 days and on the 13th day, people go on picnics or parties in a tradition called Sizdah Bedar or “thirteen in outdoors.”


Iranians mark the 13th day of Farvardin by going outdoors on picnics. 
On this day families enjoy the final day of their New Year holidays in the woods, mountains or along streams and rivers to avoid the bad luck associated with the number thirteen.

The United Nations Scientific, Educational and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) has recognized the occasion as “intangible cultural heritage of Persian origin.”

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‪#‎Zoroastrians‬.
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Chahārshanbeh Suri is an Iranian festival celebrated by all Iranians such as Persian people, Azerbaijani people, and Kurdish people. The event takes place on the eve of the last Wednesday before the Iranian New Year.
Loosely translated as "Wednesday fest" or Wednesday ‪#‎Light‬ or Red ‪#‎Wednesday‬ , from the word sur which means fest/light/red in Persian, or more plausibly, consider sur to be a variant of sorkh (red) and take it to refer either to the fire itself or to the ruddiness (sorkhi), meaning good health or ripeness, supposedly obtained by jumping over it, is an ancient Persian festival dating back to at least 1700 BCE of the early Zoroastrian era. Also called the Festival of Fire, it is a prelude to Nowruz, which marks the arrival of spring. The words Chahar Shanbeh mean Wednesday and Suri means red. Bonfires are lit to "keep the sun alive" until early morning. The ‪#‎celebration‬ usually starts in the evening, with people making bonfires in the streets and jumping over them singing "zardi-ye man az toh, sorkhi-ye toh az man". The literal translation is, my yellow is yours, your red is mine. This is a purification rite. Loosely translated, this means you want the fire to take your pallor, sickness, and problems and in turn give you redness, warmth, and ‪#‎energy‬. There are Zoroastrian religious significance attached to Chahārshanbeh Suri and it serves as a cultural festival for Persian and Iranian people.
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Chahārshanbeh Suri is an Iranian festival celebrated by all Iranians such as Persian people, Azerbaijani people, and Kurdish people. The event takes place on the eve of the last Wednesday before the Iranian New Year.
Loosely translated as "Wednesday fest" or Wednesday #Light or Red #Wednesday , from the word sur which means fest/light/red in Persian, or more plausibly, consider sur to be a variant of sorkh (red) and take it to refer either to the fire itself or to the ruddiness (sorkhi), meaning good health or ripeness, supposedly obtained by jumping over it, is an ancient Persian festival dating back to at least 1700 BCE of the early Zoroastrian era. Also called the Festival of Fire, it is a prelude to Nowruz, which marks the arrival of spring. The words Chahar Shanbeh mean Wednesday and Suri means red. Bonfires are lit to "keep the sun alive" until early morning. The #celebration usually starts in the evening, with people making bonfires in the streets and jumping over them singing "zardi-ye man az toh, sorkhi-ye toh az man". The literal translation is, my yellow is yours, your red is mine. This is a purification rite. Loosely translated, this means you want the fire to take your pallor, sickness, and problems and in turn give you redness, warmth, and #energy. There are Zoroastrian religious significance attached to Chahārshanbeh Suri and it serves as a cultural festival for Persian and Iranian people.

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#welcometoirancom #travel_to_iran #iran  #chaharchanbe_suri #party #iranian_culture #iranian_ceremony #iranian_traditional_ceremony #traditional #persia ##pars #persian #best_ceremony #amazing_ceremony #amazing_festival #new_year #traditional_culture #best_country_for_travel #best_culture #nice_ceremony
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Chahārshanbeh Suri is an Iranian festival celebrated by all Iranians such as Persian people, Azerbaijani people, and Kurdish people. The event takes place on the eve of the last Wednesday before the Iranian New Year.
Loosely translated as "Wednesday fest" or Wednesday #Light or Red #Wednesday , from the word sur which means fest/light/red in Persian, or more plausibly, consider sur to be a variant of sorkh (red) and take it to refer either to the fire itself or to the ruddiness (sorkhi), meaning good health or ripeness, supposedly obtained by jumping over it, is an ancient Persian festival dating back to at least 1700 BCE of the early Zoroastrian era. Also called the Festival of Fire, it is a prelude to Nowruz, which marks the arrival of spring. The words Chahar Shanbeh mean Wednesday and Suri means red. Bonfires are lit to "keep the sun alive" until early morning. The #celebration usually starts in the evening, with people making bonfires in the streets and jumping over them singing "zardi-ye man az toh, sorkhi-ye toh az man". The literal translation is, my yellow is yours, your red is mine. This is a purification rite. Loosely translated, this means you want the fire to take your pallor, sickness, and problems and in turn give you redness, warmth, and #energy. There are Zoroastrian religious significance attached to Chahārshanbeh Suri and it serves as a cultural festival for Persian and Iranian people.

Visit our website: welcometoiran.com

#welcometoirancom #travel_to_iran #iran  #chaharchanbe_suri #party #iranian_culture #iranian_ceremony #iranian_traditional_ceremony #traditional #persia ##pars #persian #best_ceremony #amazing_ceremony #amazing_festival #new_year #traditional_culture #best_country_for_travel #best_culture #nice_ceremony
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The #Birds garden of #Isfahan was founded in 1990s by the municipality of Isfahan and it's now under supervision of the recreation and welfare organization of the municipality. The Birds #garden has an area of 17000 m². It's enclosed and covered by a chain-link fence pitched on 11 metal columns with the height of at most 22 m. More than 5000 birds from 130 different species are kept in the garden. The birds belong to the different parts of Iran and also other countries like Australia, Indonesia, China and Tanzania.

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An Iranian City Is Known As “The City Of Polish Children”
#Isfahan is best known for its #architecture . It is so #beautiful , Iranians say, that to visit the city is to see “half the world.” And, Isfahan is 3famous for its #carpets in classical #Persian court styles.
 
But, in Poland, the city is known for still something else. It is “Isfahan - the City of Polish Children” [“Isfahan - Miasto Dzieci Polskich”]
 
In June, 2008, the #Polish postal service issued a stamp that explained why.
 

The stamp shows a small boy dressed in a cadet’s uniform. Draped behind him is an Isfahan carpet emblazoned with the Polish eagle. And next to him is the city’s #nickname in Polish: “Isfahan - Miasto Dzieci Polskich.”
 
The stamp commemorates two things: a huge tragedy in Poland’s history, and how Iran helped rescue some of the victims. But to understand the whole #story , which today is largely forgotten outside Poland, one must go back to the very start of World War II.
 
In 1939, Germany and the Soviet Union attacked Poland and divided it between them. Both the Nazis and Soviets sent huge numbers of #Poland’s elite to prisons and labor camps. But, the Soviets went a step further. They deported some 1.5 million Polish citizens to distant points in Siberia and Central #Asia .
 
The deportations of military #families , police, doctors, teachers, and anyone else suspected of patriotic feelings were intended to simplify the Polish territory’s incorporation into the Soviet Union. It also provided more laborers for the Soviet Union’s collective farms as Moscow prepared for an inevitable war with Germany.
 
Then, after forcibly settling all these families and, in the meantime, executing some 20,000 Polish officers held in prison camps, the Soviet leaders suddenly changed their strategy. As the war began with Germany in the summer of 1941, they decided to raise an army instead from among the thousands of still interned Polish #soldiers . And to improve the mood, they granted an “amnesty” to all Polish deportees.
 
The result was one of the epic journeys of World War II. The new Polish army, under an agreement between Moscow and the exiled Polish government in London, was to be sent to the North African front to fight alongside the British. So the Army assembled just north of the border with Iran, on the road to the Middle East. And it was there, at bases in Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan, that tens of thousands of deported Polish families headed in #hopes of rejoining the soldiers.
 
But for the families to succeed, they first had to escape the farms they had been assigned to (and many local bosses refused to release them), have money to buy train tickets, and travel for months from Siberia to the south under appalling conditions.
 
Parents unable to go farther gave their children to others who could. And as the journey went on, the number of orphans multiplied, to the point that the Polish army reception #centers had to set up special orphanages to accommodate them all.
 
The Polish army, known as Anders Army for its commander General W. Anders, crossed into #Iran by ship across the #Caspian or by road from Turkmenistan at the end of 1942. The exodus numbered 115,000, composed of 45,000 soldiers, 37,000 civilian adults, and 18,000 #children . Just after they crossed, the Soviet government closed the border again, preventing any more of the some 1 million Polish citizens still in the USSR from leaving.
 
For those Poles who reached Iran, after thousands died along the way, the emotions were overwhelming. Ironically, the Poles had reached a country that itself had been occupied in late 1941 by Russia and Britain. They allies did so to secure the oil fields and keep Iran open as a supply route to the Soviet army. Reza Shah Pahlavi, who had earlier brought Iran closer to Germany, was in exile in South Africa and his son was on the throne in his place.
 

However, if #Iranians resented the Russian and the British presence, they were sympathetic to the Polish refugees and welcomed them. Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi opened his private pool to the orphans. Polish soldiers saluted #Persian officers when they passed in the street. And, over time, all the orphans were relocated to Isfahan along with many Polish families because the beauty of the city was thought to be conducive to their physical and mental health.
 
After the Polish Army left for the Middle East, the families and children stayed on. From 1942 to 1945, there were 2,590 Polish children in Isfahan below the age of seven, living in what became a lively community which was very interested in Iranian culture.
 
During this time, Polish academicians in Isfahan began an Institute of Iranian Studies. And the carpet in the #background of the commemorative postage stamp was woven by Polish girls in the Isfahan school of weaving.
 
At the end of the #war , the refugees went on to Britain or to British colonies, or to the United States and Australia. But, due to a final twist of fate, none returned to Poland. That was because the Allied leaders had agreed at a meeting in #Tehran in 1943 to put Poland in the Soviet Union’s orbit. It remained there until 1989.
 
The Polish postage stamp issued in 2008 recalls all this #history . One of the orphans, Przemek Stojakowski, is the #boy on the postage stamp. On the First Day Cover that accompanies the stamp, the names of just a few of the hundreds of other orphaned children are also printed.
 
The stamp helps to explain several other things, too, including why #Dariusz remains a popular name today for Polish boys.


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Nakhcheer or #Chal_Nakhjir is a #cave situated in #Markazi Province of Iran. It is a #limestone cave approximately 70 million years old. Parts of the cave including its internal #lake have been prepared for easy #tourist access. It was discovered in 1989 and registered as a national monument in 2001. Its interior is made of crystals, dolomite sediments, stalactites and stalagmites.

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Fathabad #garden   is located 16 km North West of #Kerman, according to #historians, this pattern has been used to constructing Shazdeh Garden in Mahan. The #history   of the construction of the garden is around the year 1255 (Hijri-Shamsi), In Qajar period. Fathabad memorial garden “Fazl Ali Khan Biglarbeygi” was the ruler of Kerman. That is why it is also called #Biglarbeygi Garden. The #Fathabad Qanat water passed through fathabad Garden in the past, and it was so refreshing and lovely.
The Fathabad Garden with its old and valuable history, for a long time had been abandoned and damaged and most of the trees have dried up.

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