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Marian Beaman
41 followers
41 followers
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Marian Beaman commented on a post on Blogger.
I love knowing where other writers spend their solitary time.

Instead of upstairs/downstairs or seeking warmth like Kathy, I seek light and freedom from the internet. Lately I've been keeping my laptop on my desk in my studio where I read/write blog posts and check other social media. I "borrow" space in another room facing north for rewrites - just paper and pen. Nothing electronic! Even on cool mornings, the sun usually pours in and I feel cozy.

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Marian Beaman commented on a post on Blogger.
I felt the little "shocks" along with you as I read this fine piece. My children are Gen-Xers, not Millenials, but their views on child-rearing are certainly different from ours. The Longenecker family had no Christmas tree (considered worldly) but the Beamans do now, every year. I enjoyed your comments about "hygge," a topic I blogged about recently.

I say Amen to your conclusion: " . . .in the end, the writer must stay open to all that is happening, find in old stories a twist on the new and the surprising." Merry Christmas and a wonderful 2018 to you, Susan!

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Marian Beaman commented on a post on Blogger.
I have read The Year of Magical Thinking and also Blue Nights, both riveting and filled with angst. Your review is perceptive and careful to note what's missing, mother-daughter intimacy.

You mentioned the color red in Blue Nights, Quintana's red-soled shoes (probably Louboutins) on her wedding day and then the ebbing of life blood in the ICU. Why are colors so memorable to me? Maybe because they resonate with sound - for Didion, the sound waves of grief.

Great review, Susan!

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Marian Beaman commented on a post on Blogger.
Golly, Susan, what a trip! You prove that travel breaks down barriers and bats away fears, if you let it. Great quotes too. I look forward to Part II.

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Marian Beaman commented on a post on Blogger.
I can't top Lynn's announcement. Wow - I'm hooked too!

However, I will say that the first time I wrote a tough chapter about childhood abuse I was surrounded by women when I attended a writer's retreat the first time I visited Chincoteague. Now another reader has suggested revisions to my memoir and confided that she too has suffered similar abuse. We are never alone!

Thanks for this post, Susan, and for the writing prompt about opposite perspectives too. I think such writing would be a great way to get unblocked mentally and emotionally.

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Marian Beaman commented on a post on Blogger.
The memoir I could have written 20 years ago is far different from the one I am writing now. Why? Because I am farther along the path toward forgiveness. By the way, Kathy Pooler's introducing me to the Joseph Campbell quote above has resulted in my writing an epilogue to my current manuscript. So much rings true in this post, Susan. Thank you!

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Marian Beaman commented on a post on Blogger.
Unbelievable resume: firefighter, landscape architect, arborist and watercolorist. Memoirist - that one I can most relate to most of all. Sue, you bring such talented folks here. Thanks for introducing us to Ms. Strader, a woman with chutzpah, for sure!

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Marian Beaman commented on a post on Blogger.
May Sarton feels like a quiet friend who whispers in my ear at early morning or day's end. I find her attention to detail fascinating. Just now I remember her description of the fireplace mentle slanted with morning light. I put "At Seventy" on reserve at the library. Like Kathy, I need to read "At Eighty-Two"!

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Marian Beaman commented on a post on Blogger.
I have enjoyed books by both Natalie Goldberg and Julie Cameron, having read The Artist's Way so very long ago. How I yearn for the contentment of solitude. Family affairs in PA are consuming my life at the moment.

Also, I took a side road and read your earlier post "The Rules of Writing." So true.

Your relationship with your sons (and Lily!) is enviable. You are a blessed woman, Susan!

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Marian Beaman commented on a post on Blogger.
I have read May Sarton and am left with impressions of her being alone but not lonely, of fresh flowers both inside and outside her house, of birds . . . of time to think. Ah, that most of all!
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