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venkat sn
Works at Singapore Management University
Attended Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi
Lived in Singapore
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venkat sn

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Indian New Year is like the invisible silk thread that ties East and West Asia......Here's to wish all Indian friends Happy New Year, and for all a peek into Indian and Asian new year celebrations today! 

Iniya Puththandu – Vishu - Baisakhi - Naba Barsa - 
Poila Baisakh - Maha Vishuva Sankranti - Rongaali Bihu
Greetings !
(Iniya puthandu vazhtugal !!! Shubho nobo borsho !!! Vishu ashamsakal !!!.......)
By the way, The Singapore newspaper, Tabla, published my article on significance of different Indian and Asian new year celebrations over the weekend, (11 Apr). It is the  cover story and is continued on page 11, 12 &13. The link is http://www.tabla.com.sg/jr/jrpc.php?param=2014-04-11

The newspaper, Tabla, published the article today, 11 Apr. The link is http://www.tabla.com.sg/jr/jrpc.php?param=2014-04-11 . It was a cover story and was continued on page 11, 12 &13. 

Indian New Year is like the invisible silk thread that ties East and West Asia. Iranians are the first to kick off the festivities on the day of Spring Equinox which falls around 21 March. Balinese New Year, Nyepi, is celebrated as the day of silence in end March. Nyepi coincides with New Year (Ugadi and Gudi Padwa) celebrated by Indians from parts of India around Bangalore, Hyderabad and Mumbai. Two weeks later, people of Nepal, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka also herald the new year along with the Bengalis, Punjabis, Tamils, and others in India, in mid-April. As we move to the east, beyond Bangladesh, Myanmar’s  Maha Thingyan, Thailand’s Songkran, as well as Cambodia’s Chaul Chnam Thmey, and Lao’s Pee Mai are all celebrated in mid-April. One can easily see the similarities between the names “Sankranthi” (in Odisha, eastern India) and “Songkran”(in Thailand). Songkran and Maha Thingyan are “water festivals” like Holi festival of North India, which is however celebrated in third week of March, around the same time as Iranian New Year.

A surprise common ingredient in many Indian New year traditions is the humble Neem (Azadirachta indica). It is used as a flower, or paste to remind that in the year, like in life, all experiences will not be sweet. The deep philosophical message of the traditional Indian New year celebration is - life will be full of varied experiences, not all of them will be happy and one must accept all of them with equanimity.
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Have him in circles
168 people
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Senior Associate Director, Office of Post Graduate Professional Programme at Singapore Management University
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  • Singapore Management University
    Senior Associate Director, Office of Post Graduate Professional Programme, 2011 - present
  • Singapore Management University
    Assistant Director, Office of Career Services, 2006 - 2011
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Singapore - Mumbai - New Delhi
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Venkat SN has diversified experience in Higher Education, Overseas expansion and alliances, Global Marketing of Consumer products for over 17 years. He has an in depth knowledge and understanding of third world trade, especially between Asia, South America and Africa. He has also marketed Asian products in Europe, UK, and USA.
Education
  • Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi
    MSc Chemistry, 1984
  • Indian Institute of Foreign Trade New Delhi
    PGDIT, 1985
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