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David Eger
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David Eger

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Here is a recent remake of my Trooper vs Trooper photo I did a few years back.  My original is one of my favourites but I've always thought there needed to be more spectators... I also thought having Han and Greedo would be fun.  Do you like this version or my original better?  Let me know!
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Thanks so much David!
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David Eger

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Recently I had the opportunity to discuss my work with Valentina Vincenzini; an Italian PhD in Film Studies. She has written an essay; Beyond the Myth, based upon Star Wars Fandom and presented it at a conference in Poland. Vincenzini has used my body of work along with the writings of Joseph Campbell and a few others to explain the importance of Star Wars as a neo-myth and its relationship to modern artists. It was a very humbling experience.
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David Eger

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The seventh photograph in the series is entitled “Creation of Luke” and is based upon Michelangelo’s most famous section of his fresco in the Sistine Chapel, The Creation of Adam. It is believed by many art historians that Michelangelo’s work rivals only Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa in popularity and fame.

The Creation of Adam was completed in circa 1512 and depicts God’s creation of Adam. In the Christian faith, Adam is believed to be the first man (Eve was believed to be the first woman). The image of the near-touching hands of God and Adam has become one of the most iconic images of humanity and has been reproduced countless times, including of course my newly created work. In my recreation, God had been replaced with Darth Vader and Adam with Luke. It is my belief that Luke’s transition into a Jedi; although guided by Obi-Wan and Yoda, was strongly influenced by his various encounters with his Father and "Creator", Anakin; more commonly know by his Sith name, Darth Vader.

The scene I have used to help with my recreation is the infamous lightsaber duel on Bespin; specifically Vader and Luke’s encounter in the ventilation vents of Cloud City. It is at this point in the Empire Strikes Back that Vader reveals himself to Luke with one of the most well known lines in movie history; "… I am your Father…" Although I have had to play with a few details; like the direction of the scene, I thought this particular point in the film fit perfectly with the theme of Michelangelo’s work. I hope you agree.

Enjoy!
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David Eger

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The fifth photograph in the series is entitled “Leia Leading the Rebels” and is based upon Eugène Delacroix’s Liberty Leading the People, a painting that was created to commemorate the French Revolution. Delacroix has created a triangle composition bringing focus to Marianne; the woman who personifies Liberty.

Liberty leads the people of France over their fallen friends and family; similarly, Leia leads the Rebels after the Battle of Hoth. Both Liberty and Leia are atop of a mound of corpses, acting much like a pedestal from which our leading ladies stride. Liberty holds the tricolour flag of the French Revolution while Leia holds a flag that symbolizes the Rebellion. Notre Dame can be seen in the background of Delacroix’s masterpiece. Similarly, the Power Generators of Hoth can be seen in the background behind the smoke. The addition of the X-Wing was my way of adding Luke into the scene. During the Battle of Hoth, Han and Chewbacca take Leia and Threepio in the Millennium Falcon after a passageway collapses and she is unable to make her rendezvous. Luke than proceeds to Dagobah in his X-Wing. As this was the case, it made sense that Luke would not be in the photo. Based upon this logic, Artoo should have been replaced with Threepio. In an ideal World this would have been the case, however, Threepio was too tall and the composition did not look right. I replaced him with Artoo and the shot seemed to flow a little better. Threepio has not been forgotten, he has been placed behind Han and Chewbacca.

Enjoy!
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David Eger

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The third photograph in the series is entitled “Cantina” and is based upon Edward Hopper’s Nighthawks. Hopper’s painting depicts a couple, a solitary man and of course a diner worker in a New York diner late at night. There has been some discussion over the years in regards to the meaning of Hopper’s painting, but to most Historians it has remained very ambiguous…

I have decided to recreate the infamous Cantina scene from a New Hope. It is at this point that our Hero; Luke, has found his droids, discovered who Obi-Wan Kenobi really is and has lost his aunt and uncle to the Empire. Kenobi, Skywalker and the droids are looking for a means of escape and as a result end up in the Mos Eisley Space Port and more specifically, the Cantina. I have chosen to only include the needed characters for the recreation of this important part of the film. Skywalker, Kenobi, Wuher (the bartender) and of course Ponda Baba. This was done for a couple reasons, but mainly because the original painting only has four characters in it. When I was a child, I remember watching this scene over and over. It was one of the turning points of the film for me. The Cantina was what really introduced me to the wonderful universe of Star Wars. All the different characters and creatures where truly unique and who could forget that Cantina Band? Mos Eisley and the Cantina were also where we first saw a Jedi; Kenobi, and the Force in action!

Enjoy!
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David Eger

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Here is another version of my Cantina scene I created for the third image in my 12 Months of Hope, Empire & Jedi. I couldn't resist doing a version with Boba, Han and Chewy! I think I may even have a version with Greedo too! What do you think? Like? Dislike? Let me know!
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Recently I had the opportunity to discuss my work with Valentina Vincenzini; an Italian PhD in Film Studies.  She has written an essay; Beyond the Myth, based upon Star Wars Fandom and presented it at a conference in Poland.  Vincenzini has used my body of work along with the writings of Joseph Campbell and a few others to explain the importance of Star Wars as a neo-myth and its relationship to modern artists.  It was a very humbling experience.  If you’ve got a few minutes please check out Vincenzini’s presentation.
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David Eger

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The eighth photograph in the series is entitled “Oath of the Skywalkers” and is based upon Jacques-Louis David’s Oath of the Horatii. It has been argued by many art historians that David’s Oath of the Horatii is the most well known Neoclassic painting.

Oath of the Horatii was completed in 1784 and depicts the Roman legend about two fighting cities; Rome and Alba Longa. Three brothers from Rome; the Horatii, agreed to fight three brothers from Alba Longa; the Curiatii. All three Horatii brothers seem willing to sacrifice their lives for the good of Rome and are shown holding their arms in a salute. David’s work had a huge impact when it was created as the French Revolution was looming and it depicted loyalty to the state.

In my creation, I have replaced the three Horatii brothers with Artoo, Threepio and Luke. At first this may seem odd, however, I have always seen these three characters as one; especially the connection of Artoo and Luke as well as the obvious connection between Artoo and Threepio. They seem to complement each other. Artoo and Threepio are also unwilling; at least Threepio, partners in Luke and Leia’s plan to free Han from Jabba’s Palace in Return of the Jedi. The father of the Horatii brothers has been replaced with Leia as I feel she is the figure head of the rebellion, similarly as the father is the head of the family.

Some of you may be wondering why there are three lightsabers and why they are all different colours. David chose to paint three different types of swords, one for each brother. I have chosen to show Luke’s three lightsabers. The blue lightsaber was inherited from his father; Anakin Skywalker, through Obi-Wan Kenobi. The green lightsaber was the one Luke builds for himself; something traditionally done by Jedi (or after one looses their hand while holding their lightsaber. The red lightsaber represents Luke’s dark side. Something he would struggle with in Return of the Jedi. Luke also had a very brief forced apprenticeship with Palatine when he was forced to replace his green crystal for a red one.

I felt this scene needed to be depicted as it was both an ending and a beginning so to speak. It was the ending of the Empire Strikes Back when all hope seems to be lost, but it is also the beginning of the future where the heroes planned to rescue Han.

Enjoy!

- See more at: http://www.365daysofclones.com/#sthash.rlSuaQbq.dpuf
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David Eger

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The sixth photograph in the series is entitled “The Birth of a Jedi” and is based upon Sandro Botticelli’s The Birth of Venus, originally commissioned by the Medici family of Florence. Botticelli’s masterpiece depicts Venus emerging from the sea as a fully grown nude woman.

As the title suggests; Venus is the central figure in Botticelli’s work, she is being “born” from the sea. Similarly, Luke is being "born" from the swamp. Although Luke did receive some Jedi training from Obi-Wan, it is my belief that he did not truly become a Jedi until he met and trained with Yoda on the desolate planet of Dagobah. The figure to Venus’ right has been replaced with Artoo; this seemed appropriate as she seems to be an assistant of sorts, much like Artoo is to Luke. The flying angels to Venus’ left have been replaced with Yoda. Again, this seemed to fit for various reasons. Venus’ vessel; the shell, has been replaced with Luke’s X-Wing. The trees and shoreline have been transformed to a more appropriate "swamp like" setting; including the addition of the snake which was originally found in Luke’s bag. Finally the relatively sunny setting of Botticelli’s original has had the addition of some mist to help create an authentic swamp feel.

Enjoy!
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David Eger

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The fourth photograph in the series is entitled “The Death of Obi-Wan Kenobi” and is based upon Jacques-Louis David’s The Death of Socrates. David focuses on the story of Socrates death. As the history books tell it, Socrates is given the option of death or exile, he chooses death… Like most Renaissance paintings, The Death of Socrates is open to interpretation.

After looking for countless hours for a painting or photograph that depicted a one on one fight, I could not find one that I thought would have translated well to the duel between Darth Vader and Obi-Wan Kenobi. Instead, I have taken a little creative license to show this critical moment of A New Hope. Although this is not true visual recreation of the infamous lightsaber duel, it does contain all of the same meaning. Kenobi replaces Socrates in the centre of the scene at the moment before his death. He is surrounded by the usual suspects so to speak; Han, Leia, Artoo, Threepio and Chewbacca. Similarly, Socrates is surrounded by many of his followers. Luke, Kenobi’s last pupil, takes the place of Socrates’ most well known student; Plato, and sits in shock, perhaps questioning his master’s choice of death. Finally; Vader holds his lightsaber in place of the deadly hemlock, both items chosen by the soon to be dead.

Enjoy!
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