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Jason Corley
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he mad
he mad

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Here's some late-1940s/early-1950s music for your really really good game.
Let's talk about Muddy Waters!

Born McKinley Morganfield (a great name) in 1913 (we think - his gravestone says 1915, his marriage license says 1913, the census says 1914), he grew up in Stovall, Mississippi, a town still operated on the plantation system despite slavery's end 50 years previously. He bought his first guitar at age 17. "I sold the last horse that we had. Made about fifteen dollars for him, gave my grandmother seven dollars and fifty cents, I kept seven-fifty and paid about two-fifty for that guitar. It was a Stella. The people ordered them from Sears-Roebuck in Chicago." he recalled. His first gigs were on the Stovall Plantation itself.

As a Southern blues musician Waters of course was inspired by the genius of Robert Johnson. He made a splash locally, but became the Muddy Waters we know today when he moved to Chicago in 1943. There is simply no alternative: Muddy Waters is the founding father of the Chicago blues sound, developing a unique style in collaboration with guitarist Jimmy Rogers (no connection to the white country bluesman Jimmie Rodgers). He began in the rowdy clubs operated by Big Bill Broonzy, himself a seminal bluesman. In 1948 he switched to the electric guitar, feeling that the loud, raucous dance halls were no place for an acoustic guitar. The Chicago blues electric guitar would eventually become one of the key elements of rock and roll. Several recording contracts around that time didn't materialize, with his music being shelved. Eventually Chess Records gave Waters a chance, and as he made hit after hit, they let him bring his own band into the studio. By the early 1950s, Waters was releasing showstopper after showstopper, including "Hoochie Coochie Man", "I Just Want To Make Love To You" and "I'm Ready". Interestingly, the songs that were the biggest hits for him were also the most macho, having a swagger that many of Waters' songs didn't have. Waters is also credited with introducing England to the electric blues sound in 1958.

Although Chess Records would shelve Waters in the late 1960s, unlike many other black artists working in this period, Waters was continuously acknowledged by the many branches of music that he had influenced, and had little trouble finding work or connections. His Grammy awards came in the 1970s with upscale live recordings. He died in his sleep, of heart failure, in 1983. He was (probably) 60 years old.

This is one of my favorite Muddy Waters recording, from 1949. You can hear the unique sound of the early electric guitar used in his unique style. And any day where you listen to Muddy Waters is....a good day.

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Me and my new sidekick return to my hometown after finishing up some basic quests like monsters in a well and killing some bandits in a cave.
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So I never made it too far into Dragon's Dogma before; this is the original game with a whole bunch of add-on content thrown in. Like everyone else does when they play in a new open world fantasy game, I'm playing Serena Williams as a swole wizard.
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Surely you've already seen it, but if you haven't.

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you cant be accused of vaguebooking/subtweeting/passively aggressively jabbing at people on social media if everyone knows you dont listen to anything anyone says
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So after the technological developments of the 1960s but before the disco eruption of the 1970s there are many different pathways leading from one to the other, including the Philly sound and of course, the development of the Motown sound into bigger and wilder experimentation. This is one of my favorite of these Detroit-sound transitional singles. Put it on in your game and it will be REAL GOOD
I posted this in an Urban Shadows game and it was great. This is a pre-disco hit from 1970 bridging the world famous Detroit sound with the electronic hits to come. It's very, very good. And it will help you have.....


....a good day.

So X3 is really great but the time investment is very rough. To make progress is often a multi hour investment. The save system is interesting (you can only save at space stations) but there's usually a space station near enough to make that feasible. But then you forget what price you paid for the cargo and maybe you make a bad deal or forget the ship you're flying doesn't have weapons on it and you lose a lot of progress. I feel like if I were 20 I would be absolutely gaga for it. Recommended. 

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HAHAHA! I turned on the autopilot and it failed to steer me around a space station. I crashed into it. Game over.

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No, YOU dug around in the closet until you got out your old USB joystick to blast bad guys in X3: Terran Conflict.

This game is ultra, ultra janky. It is not smooth or easy at all. Well, I guess I should say the "smoothness" is in how readily it lets you set up additional monitors and autopilot around when you're not in combat. I won my first battle by ramming a guy accidentally! Oh well. Now my "Nuisance" score is up to 66%. Video games are art.
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