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Jason Corley
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Jason Corley

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April 15, 1951: This is the amazing Dialaphone, which was a precursor to touch tone phones. Described in the press release as "compact and attractive," it could dial pre-programmed numbers by cutting perforations in tape
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Jason Corley

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This is good for name and location generation, though it lacks a decent map. Interesting that in 1883-4, Tucson and Tombstone were considered "sister cities". Tombstone never really increased in importance after that (to say the least) while Tucson grew dramatically. Also included is a Benson, Arizona directory. The hotel in Tucson has ELECTRIC LIGHTS! In EVERY ROOM!!!!
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I like how it complains about the corporatists back east, or in San Francisco, sucking all the wealth out of Arizona... Seems like the wealthy haven't changed a bit...
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Jason Corley

Artwork And Pictures  - 
 
This is a collection of high-def imagery found in an archive in the Douglas Historical Society. Douglas, Arizona is a border town (although many of the pictures, including the picture on this post, are of Bisbee, a larger town nearby) that was the site of a copper boom. It was also one of the communities threatened by the spreading chaos of the Mexican civil war of the early 20th century. The photos date to 1905, and include boxers, soldiers, families, and a whole cross section of Western life.
Images of early 20th Century Cochise County, Arizona from the archive at the Douglas Historical Society, in Douglas, Arizona. These are some wonderful portraits discovered in an archive at the Douglas Historical Society that starts around 1905 and runs through the first two decades of that century. This is the era when Mexican populist rebel Pancho Villa was shooting up the area, and there was much turmoil on the Mexican border. The USA suppo...
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Huh, they have a picture of John Slaughter I don't recall seeing before.
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Jason Corley

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Makes me want to run a home front ww2 game.
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I found this while digging around for another topic. It's the first of three Fort Huachuca History Illustrated issues dealing with the buffalo soldiers and their history in Arizona. Don't miss the GREAT diagrams of what goes in an infantryman's pack and the little-known stories of U.S. Army intervention into the chaos in Mexico in the early part of the 20th century.
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Jason Corley

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Pulled this out of a private feed for you all. The main thing to remember about women's fashion in the 1920s was that curves were absolutely verboten. "My sexiest dress" doesn't have cleavage (though the thighs might be shown pretty provocatively!), in fact if the lady inside the dress is curvy, their options are either more matronly outfits from 20 years previous, or the many elaborate methods for reducing curves via undergarments.
The Concise Illustrated History of 1920s Women's Fashion and Style.
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Jason Corley

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One thing about Models T and A (no smart remarks from the peanut gallery) was their customizability. Just as you needed the support of a motoring club to plan cross-country trips in this time frame, you also had the ability to turn your cheap, sturdy frame into something unique to you - whether it be a primitive RV like the one below, or a piece of farm equipment, or a wider flatbed, or putting a luxury cabin in place similar to a hansom....customization was extremely common in motoring circles even once mass production began, since often times the vehicles were built from kits by owners in the first place!
 
This 1915 or ’16 Model “T” Ford has been fitted with an interesting camper attachment complete with a draw like slide-out section  serving as both a kitchen and table.
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Jason Corley

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I like all the stuff on the ticket
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Great find
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Jason Corley

Product promotion Fer Ya!  - 
 
New thing for people who like PBTA games...I'm still thinking about if it's a good match for Westerns and if so what variety....
 
Howdy pardners! Today I released my second Patreon-fueled pbta hack entitled Raising Stakes: A wild west drama game. If six-shooters and gamblin' are your vices, this game is for you!

If you want to get a copy, you can join my Patreon (which entitles you to one free game from my roster) or wait until official release; though it's always cheaper to get a copy as a Patron.

[tips his hat] Y'all take care now, ya hear?

https://www.patreon.com/medeiros
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Jason Corley

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The first race riot with an air force: the white supremacist attack on "Black Wall Street", Tulsa, Oklahoma
Jason Corley originally shared:
 
95 years ago today, the first race riot with an air force dropped firebombs on Tulsa, Oklahoma.
An Oklahoma lawyer details the attack by hundreds of whites on the thriving black neighborhood where hundreds died 95 years ago
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Jason Corley

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So this is on the late end of the Old West, but here's a US Army historical publication on the buffalo soldier experience at Ft. Huachuca, Arizona (definitely come and visit their museum if you can!), including a lot of day to day details (don't miss the diagram of how you're supposed to pack your Springfield and your saber in case you get inspected by the lieutenant!) as well as details about their experience when Mexico's revolution sent the region into chaos in the early part of the 20th century.
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Cool!
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Jason Corley

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This photo shows one reason that electrification was such a huge deal for rural areas. Refrigeration made it possible for farms to produce more (because it became possible to transport it further for sale), electric lighting permitted a shifted working day and improved educational opportunities for farm children who would otherwise still be reading by lamplight, and labor-saving electrical devices permitted the household to be run with fewer hours of work.

The Rural Electrification Administration, established under Roosevelt during the Depression, continued its work into the 1960s. In the 1970s it was estimated that 98% of all farms had access to electricity- up from around 3.2 percent fifty years earlier. In 1994, the REA was reorganized into the Rural Utilities Service, which continues to operate today to assist rural communities in getting access to utilities where private infrastructure investment is not likely to occur. http://www.rd.usda.gov/about-rd/agencies/rural-utilities-service
 
Food storage cellar, Deshee Unit, Wabash Farms, Indiana, 1940
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Have him in circles
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Let Us Game - RPG Convention's profile photo
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