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Clyde Wisham
Works at Technical writer
Attended University of Hawaii at Manoa
Lives in Yokohama
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Clyde Wisham

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Just damn. Nothing can be trusted. Not even USB cables.

"The problem is that when you plug a USB device in, it starts drawing power. If it tries to pull too much power, the device that supplies it can burn out. It’s not the Nexus’ fault that my MacBook got fried — it was just doing what it was supposed to do: ask for as much power as it can get. It’s not the MacBook’s fault either — its ports weren’t designed to handle delivering that much juice nor to know that they shouldn’t even try. It is the fault of the cable, which is supposed to protect both sides from screwing up the energy equation with resistors and proper wiring. This kind of failure is possible with any cable, but older kinds of USB devices didn’t draw this much power."
Over the past year or so, one of the biggest tech stories have been about one of the smallest things: a USB plug. Specifically, the new USB Type-C plug and port, which promises to become the single thing that we can use to connect all our devices, from monitors to phones to computers to whatever we dream up next
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Spent the day grading English tech writing tests. One effort particularly caught my fancy:

"Decades after engineers honed the design, the cable-stay bride debuted in its full form in the U.S."
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Clyde Wisham

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Anything that will help provide reliable earthquake forecasting is welcome. Especially important to those of us that live in active seismic zones.

"There is a relationship, which we showed here in California, between the time between 'snaps' on the small, strong patches where earthquakes happen and how much slip took place on the quiet fault surrounding them," Nadeau said. "Using this relationship for thousands of repeating earthquakes in Japan, we were able to map out the evolution of slow-slip on the megathrust. Then, by studying the pattern of this evolution, we discovered the periodic nature of the megathrust slow-slip and its relationship to larger earthquakes."
In Japan and areas like the Pacific Northwest where megathrust earthquakes are common, scientists may be able to better forecast large quakes based on periodic increases and decreases in the rate of slow, quiet slipping along the fault.
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I just spent way too much time on this illustration. (Bad, Internet. Bad.)

And, check the FAQ:
"Q: And where's TARDIS?
A: It's both too large and too small for the chart."
FAQ: Q: Is it okay for me to download and print the poster? A: Of course! I may never be making money off it and sell it via DevArt's poster-print service, but that doesn't mean this may not be pri...
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The Locus Annual Recommended Reading List for 2015 is up.
Get your SF&F reading Jones on.
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'Bout time, I guess. But, do we really want NASA heading up such an important mission?
A new NASA organization dedicated to protecting Earth from dangerous asteroids has hit the ground running.
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Well, the Flint, MI poison drinking water crisis being an example of what happens when you "run government like a business", yeah, I think NASA will do fine. :-)
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Some of these photos are quite wonderful.
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A true WTF moment.

HT: Charlie Stross
"In other news, we live in a world where police dinosaurs chase flying robots."
Attack eagles are training to become part of the Dutch National Police anti-drone arsenal
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Clyde Wisham

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Exoskeletons are getting very close to being useful on a daily basis.
Until recently, being paralyzed from the waist down meant using a wheelchair to get around. And although daily life is more accessible to wheelchair users, they still face physical and social limitations. But researchers have been working to change that.
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It's like living in a science fiction novel. For good or evil, brain-computer interfaces are coming soon.
An experiment by University of Washington researchers is setting the stage for advances in mind reading technology. Using brain implants and sophisticated software, researchers can now predict what their subjects are seeing with startling speed and accuracy.
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Smokejumpers! Fighting forest fires for 75 years.

http://old-photos.blogspot.jp/2016/02/fire-fighters.html
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John Green tests life hacks gleaned from the Internet. Hilarious.
Some of them actually work.
Do any of these actually make your life easier?
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People
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Occupation
Technical Writer
Employment
  • Technical writer
    Technical Writer, 2006 - present
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Yokohama
Previously
All over (service brat) - Parsons - Fort Walton Beach - Honolulu - Adana - Del Rio
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Introduction
American, living in Yokohama (Japan), technical writer, married.
Education
  • University of Hawaii at Manoa
    MS in Geology and Geophysics, 1970 - 1975
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Male
Clyde Wisham's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
This Wireless Explosives Detector Is the Size of a Postage Stamp | WIRED
www.wired.com

For public safety agencies, sniffing out explosives and other contraband is a tricky task. Handheld explosive detectors can be as small as a

Jonathan Franzen Shakes His Fist at the Clouds, Especially the Virtual O...
whatever.scalzi.com

Maybe nobody will care about printed books 50 years from now, but I do. When I read a book, I'm handling a specific object in a specific

New kind of metal in the deep Earth: Iron oxide undergoes transition und...
www.sciencedaily.com

The intense pressures and temperatures in Earth's deep interior squeeze atoms and electrons so close they interact differently. New experime