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Clyde Wisham
Works at Technical writer
Attended University of Hawaii at Manoa
Lives in Yokohama
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Clyde Wisham

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Something else for those in North America to worry about.
The New Madrid fault zone has been quiet for quite a while.
In the early 19th century, a series of massive quakes rocked Missouri. Some experts predict that the state could be in for another round of violent shaking, while others warn that a big quake could strike elsewhere in the center of the continent.
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Clyde Wisham

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First look at the new Star Trek ship, USS Discovery.
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The third pole.
This is important. You might want to read the whole thing.
(Also, the photographs are magnificent.)

"*Deep in the Himalayas* sits a remote research station that is tracking an alarming trend in climate change, with implications that could disrupt the lives of more than 1 billion people and pitch the most populated region of the world into chaos.
The station lies in the heart of a region called the Third Pole, an area that contains the largest area of frozen water outside of the North Pole and South Pole.
Despite its relative anonymity, the Third Pole is vitally important; it is the source of Asia's 10 largest rivers including the Yellow, the Yangzi, the Mekong, the Irrawaddy and the Ganges — and their fertile deltas.
Flows from the glaciers that give the pole its name support roughly 1.3 billion people in China, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Afghanistan — and the glaciers are melting fast.
...Half a century of research shows the temperature has increased by 1.5 degrees in the area, more than double the global average. More than 500 glaciers have completely disappeared, and the biggest ones are retreating rapidly.
...
Because of its size, altitude and the amount of water it holds, the Third Pole is a major engine of global weather.
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A recent report he compiled found 509 smaller glaciers have vanished in the past 50 years and many more will go by 2050.
Now Professor Qin and his team fear the bigger ones will shrink dramatically.
He says the reason for the great melt is that the temperature has been increasing at a much faster rate up in the Qinghai Tibetan Plateau.
"From the data we had over 50 years, it showed in our research areas the temperature increased by 1.5 degrees Celsius — it is much higher than the national temperature increase," he says.
"It is because, in the high altitude areas, the temperature is sensitive to the global warming."
...
But the scientists are discovering another factor that is causing the big melt: pollution from vehicle exhaust and coal burners is now making its way up to the region.
Black carbon particles and dust land on the glaciers and absorb the sun and heat, unlike the white ice that reflects it.
Chen Jizu is just finishing his PhD on the issue and walks all over the Mengke Glacier collecting samples of dirty ice.
"We did the calculation for a year, it was between 2013 and 2014," he says. "It was in summer when the melting was the strongest.
"We calculated the dust and the black carbon: two of them could cause around 50 per cent of melting."
"
At the top of the world a climate disaster is unfolding that threatens the lives of more than a billion people.
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Clyde Wisham

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The Turkish Crackdown toll passes 50,000. This efficiency indicates to me that Erdogan had lists of those to be targeted (and proscribed?) prepared in advance. He was ready.
It is the end of Turkey as a secular state. There are hard times ahead for the Turkish people.
More than 50,000 people have been detained, sacked or suspended from their jobs amid a crackdown in Turkey following last week's failed coup.
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If the people of Turkey want this, who are others to judge?

I just ask that the Western world does not act hypocritically and look pass this. Imagine if Russia or China imprisoned 50,000+ political activists in less than a week? NATO would threaten war for " Freedom and Democracy "

But this will not happen with Turkey but it is an ally of the U.S
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Clyde Wisham

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Fear nothing.
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Old Master Paintings Animated
This is what art looks like on drugs.
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Feel the burn.
Once primed, a supervolcano can decompress and erupt in under a year, a new study shows, offering little warning before a potentially cataclysmic event. Supervolcanoes, the hulking geological...
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Clyde Wisham

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Chef David Chang has some deep thoughts about preparing food.
Quite interesting.
The great foods of the world share the same flavor patterns. Learn the code, and crank out the hits.
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Clyde Wisham

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I wish them luck.
EFF is suing the US government to invalidate the DMCA's DRM provisions
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Some of these photographs are quite poignant. Look and make your on judgment if you will.
http://www.leenks.com/link533105.html
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Whoa. I never want to see another skin pore in my life. :-)
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Clyde Wisham

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Does this sound like anyone you know?
Sounds really familiar to me.
Know anyone who is highly competitive, and portrays himself as a winner and all others as losers?
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Why we have to sleep:

"One idea is that sleep helps us consolidate new memories, as people do better in tests if they get a chance to sleep after learning. We know that, while awake, fresh memories are recorded by reinforcing connections between brain cells, but the memory processes that take place while we sleep have remained unclear.
Support is growing for a theory that sleep evolved so that  connections in the brain can be pruned down during slumber, making room for fresh memories to form the next day. “Sleep is the price we pay for learning,” says Giulio Tononi of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, who developed the idea.
Now we have the most direct evidence yet that he’s right. Tononi’s team measured the size of these connections or synapses in brain slices taken from mice. The synapses in samples taken at the end of a period of sleep were 18 per cent smaller than those in samples taken from before sleep, showing that the synapses between neurons are weakened during slumber.
The purpose of sleep may be to weaken the new brain connections we form during the day, ensuring we have enough capacity to form more memories when we wake up
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Interesting. in South China, it is normal to sleep for 1.5-2 hours in the middle of the day - my students had a 2.5 hour nap break in their schedules (and therefore also in mine). Maybe they are onto something.
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Work
Occupation
Technical Writer
Employment
  • Technical writer
    Technical Writer, 2006 - present
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Yokohama
Previously
All over (service brat) - Parsons - Fort Walton Beach - Honolulu - Adana - Del Rio
Story
Introduction
American, living in Yokohama (Japan), technical writer, married.
Education
  • University of Hawaii at Manoa
    MS in Geology and Geophysics, 1970 - 1975
Basic Information
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Male
Clyde Wisham's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
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