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Christina Lea (Robin)
1,149 followers -
Writer, RPGamer, Mad Scientist, Liar. Also known as Robin Lea.
Writer, RPGamer, Mad Scientist, Liar. Also known as Robin Lea.

1,149 followers
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Lately, for a variety of reasons, it seems like I've ended up doing a lot more of my public posting on Facebook and Twitter, so here's a couple of links in case you're interested:
https://www.facebook.com/robinchristinalea/
https://twitter.com/RChristinaLea

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NEW! Pick up trick tips from the '72 Halloween edition of The Ritual & Decorative Arson Newsletter. Happy Halloween! https://scarfolk.blogspot.com/2017/10/the-ritual-decorative-arson-newsletter.html
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Interesting thought.
The platforms are natural monopolies since their usefulness comes from gathering all users under one roof. Natural monopolies can not be handled by the market and should be socialized.

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More than you ever wanted to know about my Gen Con trip:

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Gravity's Grin
Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity, published over 100 years ago, predicted the phenomenon of gravitational lensing. And that's what gives these distant galaxies such a whimsical appearance, seen through the looking glass of X-ray and optical image data from the Chandra and Hubble space telescopes. Nicknamed the Cheshire Cat galaxy group, the group's two large elliptical galaxies are suggestively framed by arcs. The arcs are optical images of distant background galaxies lensed by the foreground group's total distribution of gravitational mass.

Of course, that gravitational mass is dominated by dark matter. The two large elliptical "eye" galaxies represent the brightest members of their own galaxy groups which are merging. Their relative collisional speed of nearly 1,350 kilometers/second heats gas to millions of degrees producing the X-ray glow shown in purple hues. Curiouser about galaxy group mergers? The Cheshire Cat group grins in the constellation Ursa Major, some 4.6 billion light-years away.

Image & info via APOD
https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/astropix.html
Image Credit: X-ray - NASA / CXC / J. Irwin et al. ; Optical - NASA/STScI

#space #nasa #gravity #gravitationallensing #science #astrophysics

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Excuse me, but I'm now going to commence staring at a map of the World of Greyhawk as if it were real.

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Latest over-the-desk #shelfie
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