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Anna Tarkov
Worked at Tribune Company
Attended University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC)
Lives in Northbrook, IL
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Anna Tarkov

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Pretty fly for a white guy :)
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very cute
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Anna Tarkov

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1st year doctor's visit
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hmmm nice
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Read my story about Journatic, a company that churns out tons of local news content for many U.S. newspapers: http://www.poynter.org/latest-news/top-stories/179555/journatic-staffer-takes-this-american-life-inside-outsourced-journalism/
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I disagree - if I want local news, I want someone who knows what is going on in my City.  I do agree with the lack of choice, especially if the reader is dependent upon print news only.  However, most larger media outlets integrate radio as well as print - radio often does a much better job of getting local news out because the news can be supplemented with talk radio, the latter of which can be both of value or misleading. 
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Can someone at the New York Times explain this ad??!!!
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Weird.
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Benji Cash :-)
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Another reason to support sustainable living. The lowest price of goods all to often comes with a price that someone else has had to pay, and that is on us, the consumer.
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Anna Tarkov

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What a cutie!
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+Anna Tarkov , did you read this? 
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Thank GOD. Local TV news isn't that important unless one is looking for traffic, weather or breaking news. All this and more in this fascinating Pew report: http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2011/Local-news/Part-1.aspx
Overview | Pew Internet & American Life Project
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Anna Tarkov

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"Nick Carr recently wrote a piece called Raise High the Paywalls: http://www.roughtype.com/archives/2011/09/raise_high_the_1.php

Here's a thoughtful and articulate response from Josh Wilson of http://artsandmedia.net/ on:


OK, this is a thoughtful and important essay. I particularly like his discussion of multimodal information delivery; it takes a nice, accommodating, global perspective on the different ways people want to access information, and the ways distinct media present it.

I will take strong exception to his prognosis to "raise high the paywalls" -- not because newspapers shouldn't look after the bottom line, but rather for the more specific reason that news for profit will ultimately and always underserve democracy.

Also, I want to forecast my conclusion -- Mr. Carr's essay says more about the potential of the individual-donor model than it does about the pay-for-access model for sustaining journalism.

Now: People often conflate the "crisis of journalism" with the "crisis of profitability" in commercial media. They are not the same. Long before the Internet and Craig Newmark came along to disintermediate $XX billion of classifieds revenue, newspapers and commercial media in general were trending toward the trivial, the distracting, the easy, and skewed coverage targeting their marketing demographic rather than encompassing coverage targeted at every sector of society.

Please keep in mind that sharp declines in news-media marketshare predate the Internet by 20-30 years. Newspapers starting losing ground (aka readership) in the late '60s. TV news began losing ground in the early '90s, back when the only website you ever heard of was IUMA, and you only knew about it if you were on a university campus or a major city with a tech industry.

So raise high the paywalls, sure! That's your business.

But who's going to make sure the underserved get the vital civic information they need? If they can't afford a subscription. If they don't have an Internet connection.

Wait, people don't have an Internet connection? There is such a thing as a digital divide. Earlier this year, at the dedication of one of Philly's new BTOP centers (the Broadband Technology Opportunities Program has funded about 70 of such centers around that town), the mayor, Michael Nutter, noted that in 2011, 40 percent of Philadelphians do not have Internet access. Take a look at stats and you'll find that gap is most pronounced between Philadelphia's wealthiest and poorest citizens.

So raise high the payalls. But is that actually going to solve the crisis of journalism? Or just make it worse?

I read Carr's essay and I see all the more reason for deepening subsidy for public-interest journalism delivered without fear, favor -- or need for any sort of monetization. What matters most is that the information is simply accurate, and accessible by the people who need it when they need it, regardless of their qualities as an advertising demographic.

Now, I don't have any data, but I don't think Mr. Carr does either on this, so I want to put a different spin on one of his key assertions:

"The music industry's distasteful program of suing kids for downloading craploads of free tunes actually worked; it put a little bit of fear into the minds of downloaders - and their parents."

I don't suspect that's the case. Perhaps to some degree. But you know, I think you'll find plenty of people who tend not to "freeload," and who don't have a problem with giving money to an artist (as opposed to a record company) for their work ...

Similarly, I think you will find that people who do have some degree of income and a small sense of their connection to a greater whole in our society are in fact far more likely to behave like an individual donor -- supporting the production of news content because it's a generalized good for society as well as a specific benefit for themselves -- than they are to behave like a purchaser of news.

For me, this is not about some news products being more fungible -- though if they are, that's fine, I suppose.

For me, this is about journalism being like the Red Cross. When you need it, you damn well need it, and no amount of dithering with profit models is going to matter one whit if you don't have it.

Let's be clear -- journalism in the United States has powerful currents that move forward the public good with clear-eyed, open-minded, accessible coverage on complex topics. But is that good enough? When a World News section is limited to the same-old AP output? When 40,000 journalists have been laid off since 2000? When a permanent spot on the front page covering celebrity gossip is more important than one that offers the latest fact-checking of the latest local-election circulars to arrive in your mailbox?

Journalistically, our information economy in the United States is similar to the water infrastructure of Haiti, post-earthquake. There's lots of it everywhere, it is just that much of it is overrun with pathogens that lead to terminal conditions -- and all the little encampments boiling their water or setting up sterilization mechanisms are too disparate, and too underresourced, to have a larger societal impact.

No one can say our democracy is in any way healthy.

Raise high the paywalls?

Call the Red Cross -- before it's too late.

Josh W. / SF, CA
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Story
Tagline
Blogger, journalist, media and politics junkie and lately, a new mom. Passionate about reforming the news business.
Introduction
I read and think a lot. As a result, I write.
Bragging rights
Became a journalist entirely from scratch. Whether I can be consistently paid to be one is another matter entirely...
Education
  • University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC)
  • Adlai E. Stevenson High School
  • Aptakisic Junior High
  • Elm Place Elementary
Basic Information
Gender
Female
Relationship
Married
Apps with Google+ Sign-in
Work
Occupation
Blogger, journalist, writer or whatever you want to call it. I want to save the media. Mainly from itself.
Employment
  • Tribune Company
  • WindyCitizen.com
  • H+A International, Inc.
  • Jasculca/Terman and Associates, Inc.
  • Lifeway Foods, Inc.
  • Shah Engineering, Inc.
  • True Value Company
  • State Farm Insurance
  • Time Out Chicago
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Northbrook, IL
Previously
Kiev, Ukraine - Chicago, IL - Alsip, IL - Deerfield, IL - Highland Park, IL