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Peter Vogel
51,692 followers -
Teacher | Network Admin | Journalist | Technology Enthusiast | CERN HST2011
Teacher | Network Admin | Journalist | Technology Enthusiast | CERN HST2011

51,692 followers
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Roughly $75 drop in Bitcoin Saturday morning, American time.

A sharp drop has brought the trading range down to the $2675-$2700 range.

Competing cryptocurrency Ethereum shows an even bigger percentage drop.

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Google stops sniffing through your Gmail.

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Google Home available in Canada starting next week.

Google's assistant is launching in Canada. Get a free Chromecast if you place an order ahead of the launch.

Note that Google Home Canada will not have all the features of it's American relative. For instance it will not launch here with multiple user support.

http://www.bestbuy.ca/en-ca/google-store/google-home.aspx?icmp=Homepage_SectionA_Mainfeature_googlehome_learnmore

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Caught it! An Iridium flare.

Jun 23, 23:00:48 -6.9 29° 270° (W) Iridium 72 0 km (W)

Those are the technical details.

I was shooting in the city, under a street light. The details above told me where to aim, basically due West and about 30 degrees up from the horizon.

Slightly ahead of the appointed time, Iridium 72 appeared, dim at first and then increasing dramatically in brightness, briefly flaring brighter than anything in the sky tonight. And then fading away.

My image is a 20 s time exposure. You'll see some shaking in the flare image. That's the shutter opening and vibrating the camera.

The big "globe" is the reflection of the street light from a window into the camera.

Shot at 200 ISO and 5.6 aperture.
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Caught it! An Iridium flare.

Jun 23, 23:00:48 -6.9 29° 270° (W) Iridium 72 0 km (W) -6.9

Those are the technical details. I was shooting in the city, under a street light. The details above told me where to aim, basically due West and about 30 degrees up from the horizon. Slightly ahead of the appointed time, Iridium 72 appeared, dim at first and then increasing dramatically in brightness, briefly flaring brighter than anything in the sky tonight. And then fading away.

My image is a 20 s time exposure. You'll see some shaking in the flare image. That's the shutter opening and vibrating the camera.

The big "globe" is the reflection of the street light from a window into the camera.

Shot at 200 ISO and 5.6 aperture. 
Photo

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Caught it! An Iridium flare.

Jun 23, 23:00:48 -6.9 29° 270° (W) Iridium 72 0 km (W) -6.9

Those are the technical details. I was shooting in the city, under a street light. The details above told me where to aim, basically due West and about 30 degrees up from the horizon. Slightly ahead of the appointed time, Iridium 72 appeared, dim at first and then increasing dramatically in brightness, briefly flaring brighter than anything in the sky tonight. And then fading away.

My image is a 20 s time exposure. You'll see some shaking in the flare image. That's the shutter opening and vibrating the camera.

The big "globe" is the reflection of the street light from a window into the camera.

Shot at 200 ISO and 5.6 aperture.

>>>
Followup in response to a question about just what this is.

A decade or more ago, an American company decided to get into the satellite phone business. They launched 77 (the atomic number of the element Iridium) satellites into low-earth orbit.

These satellites have an antenna that happens to produce very powerful reflections of sunlight. When the geometry is just right, meaning the position of the Sun, the satellite, and an observer on the ground, a "flare" is produced. It only lasts a few seconds but it can be spectacular. These flares are completely predictable and there are web sites and apps that provide this information.

A given flare is visible only over a rather small area and the brightness varies within that area. For this observation of mine I happened to be at a location where the brightness was at a peak.

Hope this provides some insight.
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Gorgeous APOD photo.

Shot on the solstice. Crescent moon, Venus and noctilucent clouds.

https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap170623.html

Hoping to see a Class A Iridium (satellite) flare this evening:

Jun 23, 23:00:48 -6.9 29° 270° (W) Iridium 72 0 km (W) -6.9.


0 km!

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Enjoying listening to SiriusXM's Watercolors (channel 66) on my Chromebook.


Thank you SiriusXM Canada for no-charge one year run of SiriusXM online.
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