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Chris Harvey
Web developer, technical writer, Virginian, former math teacher, musician. ♥ lifting, swimming, cooking, outer space, animals, human rights.
Web developer, technical writer, Virginian, former math teacher, musician. ♥ lifting, swimming, cooking, outer space, animals, human rights.
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HTML Proposal: allow <li> elements inside <dl> elements. Their presence in <dl> would of course be optional, but if present they would be required to have exactly one or more <dt> elements followed by one or more <dd> elements and nothing else. Exactly the same as the old XHTML 2.0 <di> proposal, but we're allowing the reuse of <li>. This would help CSS issues (no more floating hacks) as well as allow for nested Microdata!
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Is there any good reason the <address> element is rendered in italics?
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A transcription of my thoughts in one of +Anderson Norton 's Math Education classes (Oct 18, 2010). From the recording, I could tell that I was thinking faster than I was talking, so I paraphrased a little:

Epistemologically, I take the constructivist point of view. I believe that we humans in general create math to describe the world around us. Seeing new evidence from science, theories are changing all the time. First you have a "sun god," and then you discover what really makes the sun rise. Newton thought he had gravity down, and then Einstein comes in with a whole new perspective. Theories are what we use to describe the universe, and math is the language we create to represent them.

Why should students learn math? It's not necessarily the content, its more about the processes. Problem solving, analytical thinking, logical reasoning, effective communication, meaningful relationship/connection building. These are all skills students will need, even outside the math classroom. Learning math helps build these skills.

Students often ask, "Why should I learn this?" or, "How is it useful?" It's not what you're learning thats useful, its how you're learning it, what processes you're using, and what you're doing with those processes.
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CSS needs some sort of subroutine feature.

Remember Less/Sass mixins? Yeah, like that, except instead of having to compile all that duplicate code, the browser would just "GOTO" that rule, implement the styles, and then return back where it left off. Example below. (Syntax open for discussion.)

@rule button {
    /* creates a subroutine, a set of rules that can be "mixed-in" anywhere. This cannot be used in HTML (that is, <span class="button"> would do nothing). */
    border: 1px solid black;
    border-radius: 5px;
}
.button-error {
    import-rule: button; /* "calls" the button subroutine. when the browser reads this, it imports the styles defined in $button above, then returns back when done. */
    background-color: red;
}
.button-success {
    import-rule: button;
    background-color: green;
}

Like I said, just like mixins, except the CSS doesn't have all that duplicate code! The browser should know how to handle it!

Caveat:

don't allow subroutines to implement other subroutines. I.e., the following would create a feedback loop:

@rule routine1 { import-rule: routine2; /* some styles */ }
@rule routine2 { import-rule: routine1; /* some styles */ }
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Cutting out all the fat, here's what I see: (emphasis mine)

From the W3C HTML 5.1 Working Draft:
<http://www.w3.org/TR/html51/>

"The b element represents a span of text to which attention is being drawn... without conveying any extra importance and with no implication of an alternate voice or mood..."

"The i element represents a span of text in an alternate voice or mood, or otherwise offset from the normal prose... indicating a different quality of text..."

"The u element represents a span of text with an unarticulated... rendered, non-textual annotation..."

Ok, let's try another source, the Mozilla Developer Network:
<https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/HTML/Element>

"The HTML b element represents a span of text stylistically different from normal text, without conveying any special importance or relevance..."

"The HTML i element represents a range of text that is set off from the normal text for some reason..."

"In HTML5, this element [the u element] represents a span of text with an unarticulated... rendered, non-textual annotation..."

Now, explain the difference???
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