Profile

Cover photo
Jack Hammer
Works at Second story man
41,037 views
AboutPostsPhotosVideos+1'sReviews

Stream

Jack Hammer

Shared publicly  - 
 
Spanish Grand Prix 2016
The facts are.... Rosburg has always been a nervous type. He suffers anxiety and is not really
comfortable in his own skin. I thought he’d pretty much outgrown this jitteriness,
but he evidently still gets stress induced anxiety that sometimes makes his
bra...
1
Add a comment...

Jack Hammer

commented on a video on YouTube.
Shared publicly  - 
 
Airline pilots actually don't do much flying anymore. In some cases the plane can go from rotate on takeoff to final landing approach without the pilot doing more than turning dials on the navigation system and autopilot. There's a video on YouTube of the first flight if an Airbus super jumbo flying into SFO (sorry, San Francisco International). It's very cool to watch as he has the plane fly into the traffic pattern, do all the legs just turning dials until you see the runway out the front instead of the bay. He takes the controls at 200 feet.... and wouldn't you know it... he bangs the runway.. That big beauty of a beast actually bounced lol

 In many ways this kind of flying makes us safer. But then again the pilot of Asiana flight 214 chose an "inappropriate autopilot mode", wasn't paying attention, didn't figure out what was happening until they were under 100, didn't take the plane back over in time and crashed short of that same runway with part of the plane actually hitting the bulkhead seawall where the land comes out of the bay. It us utterly amazing, and I hate to say it this way, but only 3 people died. 131 injured with a dozen or so admitted as critical. NTSB said it was caused by an "Over-reliance on automation and lack of systems understanding by the pilots".

 I strongly believe this lack of hours actually flying the airplane reduces the muscle memory skills a pilot needs.

I ride motorcycle ever since I was less than sixteen. (I'm 64) But I can't ride for months at a time because of cold weather ice and snow. When I start riding again each spring I'm very aware of my body needing hours of starting, shifting, downshifting, braking, leaning, turning and looking to restart the pathways between my brain and my body before it can do the coordinated dance with rhythm and timing to do it well, without thinking about it.

Landing an airplane is much like that. Landing requires the pilot to make the airplane and extension of themselves. In a sense, the pilot needs to feel like he is what is flying, not the airplane. The yoke, rudders and throttles are the things he moves to make him move where he knows he needs to be to land. And those things are interrelated in ways that aren't intuitive and have to be learned. An example would be being a little low on final approach. Intuition says raise the nose and you'll go up, when in fact going slow with flaps down if you just raise the nose you will go down. In landing movements of the yoke to raise or lower the nose have to be connected to your hand on the throttle to increase or decrease power. Your muscle memory and feel in the seat of your pants has to integrate pitch and power. Need altitude in final approach? Lift the nose AND apply power. If you don't apply more power the nose will be right where you want it but a look at instruments will show you to be descending and faster than you were and your airspeed went down too. You'll end up short.... and  bang the runway. (or worse yet, you could stall the airframe and spin) Too high on final?  Lower the nose, but your muscle memory has to automatically tell your other hand to reduce power.  If not you'll gain too much airspeed to be able to flare.. and without the flare...  you'll bang the runway.

Plus all landings have to be made from scratch. Flying is easy, landing is hard. The airplane will feel different depending on the number of passengers, weight of the luggage and cargo and remaining fuel load AND that fluid being flown in, the air, will be different every time. Altitude, temperature, humidity, headwinds, wind reversals, crosswinds, gusting winds, rains, how heavy the rains, snow. All of those things have to be felt in the balance mechanisms in your ears and the way you have to learn to interact with the instruments, and then the brain has to send signals to the muscles with very little conscious thought.

It is true today's pilots do a usually several landings a day. But in my opinion if that's basically the only flying you do you won't have a proper feel for the airplane and no part of flying requires proper feel than landing, so you bang the runway.
 
 
In December I flew on MD-80's. The first ones came into service 34 years ago. The last one was built 15 years ago. Hard landings are hard on everything in the airplane but I think the biggest stress airlines put them under is how hard today's pilots stop them. Hard brakes, high throttle reverse thrusters, the planes shutter hard. And every time I still see very long stretches of unused runway when they turn off. They aren't doing because they need to or because it's the safest way to land because hard braking with reverse thrusters on an airliner has it's own risks. Like your car, the harder you brake the harder it is to keep it moving in a straight line. But it's worse, Imagine your car had one wheel under the radiator and the rest were under the seats. While it’s an exaggeration, imagine putting a heavy wide load moving well over a hundred miles per hour centered it on a skateboard and using the skateboard wheels for braking and steering. I don't see any safety advantage to using just over half a runway. And from a passage seat it feels like it is hard on the airplane. Keep in mind the MD 80's these pilots were doing these shaking hard stops on weigh on landing somewhere between 80 and 100 thousand pounds. Slamming one to a stop has to be hard on something more than brake pads rotors and tires.

The most likely reason is to reduce the time it takes to the terminal. But a couple of these 2 hour flights where ten minutes or more early. To continually make what feels damn near like panic stops on an aging fleet of airplanes is a bad idea safety wise. Any lapses of inspections on these old airplanes could result in anything from sections of the fuselage coming off too hydraulic failures to electrical gremlins ranging from bad data to fires. A lot of airlines are using some very old airplanes to do 2 to about 4 hour routes, which means takeoffs, cabin compression, cabin depressurization, landings and stops several times a day.

It's worrisome.

Jack Hammer

commented on a video on YouTube.
Shared publicly  - 
 
Jack, your memories predate Positively Front Street. The wax museme was there before Barry built the place. Same spot.

steamed clams were the special.

thurber was barry's dog that had been stolen. the ads used to say "Eat a burger for Thurber". I started as the day bartender/cook. I booked the entertainment for a long time. the bubble magic guy tom knotty used to stop by and  preform between sets and pass the hat. then I worked nights and closed the place. Then we knocked the wall down between the game room and the pool room and built a backgammon parlor. i ran the backgammon tournaments. then I ran the whole show for about a year and lived in the apartment upstairs. when the big bands played the coconut grove ballroom i'd take a break go over an in through the loading dock and watch a set from back or side stage. Woody Herman, Harry James band, Tex Beneke Orchestra, Stan Kenton band and one night i reopened the grill to feed the sax section of the glen miller band.
I don't think "strange" is the right word for Barry at all. He was strong minded, independent, direct, frank and did not suffer fools. He, and people like me that worked for him, put a lot of work into his projects, like building the Beer Garden out back. When the Hells Angles, yes I mean real Hells Angles, some of which were Barry's friends, started causing to much trouble in the pool room and giving a hard time to closing bartenders, myself included, about closing time, he got us together and knocked the wall down eliminating the pool room in favor of backgammon it took care of the problem. I think I do remember one biker that played some decent backgammon, and we did a hell of a business on tournament nights.
My Name is Jack Warner. I was usually called Warner.
 

Jack Hammer

commented on a video on YouTube.
Shared publicly  - 
 
very nice. does it give the big bottom sound D45s are known for?

Jack Hammer

commented on a video on YouTube.
Shared publicly  - 
 
thanks for your effort to let us hear it but the sound is too low. the wavy pulsing is strictly a function of tuning. a piano tuner trained by ear listens for the beats when he plays two notes together. each interval has different beats. the ones our ears most easily hear are thirds, both major and minor, 4ths, 5ths and 7ths, especially the raised 7th. since it's nearly impossible to perfectly tune a guitar the nature of the beats and overtones will change every time you go to your tuner. actually, us old guys learned to use the beats and harmonics to tune the guitar by ear before the days of affordable tuners.

what i keep hoping to hear on the martin copy is the bottom sound on full chords, like a full G chord emphasizing the bottom strings. the booming bottom is what the 45s are famous for.

Jack Hammer

Shared publicly  - 
 
Arguing Bernie Sanders supporters
 "I frankly don't care if you think I know what I am talking about." This was a comment on you tube in response to me asking if she actually could tell me what was happening around Benghazi before a coalition of countries launched air strikes against Qadda...
1
Add a comment...

Jack Hammer

Shared publicly  - 
 
I met this guy on at a bike night in late July. He's just like he is on this video. Humble, smart, funny, open and fun to talk to. I originally just wanted to say hello to him because I'd seen part of this video and the next thing I know almost an hour had gone by and we were the last 2 bikes still there. (mine is restored as original 82 Honda Magna V-45). I think what he did here is astounding. You don't meet someone every day who made their own engine. You read that correctly. He made the engine. He didn't assemble an engine out of parts manufactured by others. He carved molds out of wood and took the molds to a foundry that cast the parts out of aluminum. And then he did it again but made the engine bigger. One has 13,000 miles on it, the other has more. Reliable, clean and leak free, and the sound is just as remarkable as he describes it here. I'd love to see him make a living at this but he says to many people that say they are exited to have one fizzle out when it comes time to write the check. He needs a closer.
1
Add a comment...

Jack Hammer

commented on a video on YouTube.
Shared publicly  - 
 
Jack, I notice a couple of messages from you "in reply to barryjones335"
what you were replying to, and barryjones335 appear to be gone. What happened?

Jack Hammer

commented on a video on YouTube.
Shared publicly  - 
 
what the fuck is wrong with people like you? you fucking lying scum bucket.

Jack Hammer

commented on a video on YouTube.
Shared publicly  - 
 
looks like you got a great find. can't tell of the  bass booms like the martins but i could hear the sustain. how much?

Jack Hammer

commented on a video on YouTube.
Shared publicly  - 
 
you gave no impression about what this guitar really sounds like. martins, especially 28's up are famous for the booming bass notes and great harmonics when playing chords. you can play 30 second diddies on anything. I want to hear what it sounds like when someone plays a big fat chord like a F Maj 7 add 9 chord (a full F Maj 7 with your second finger lifted) or a full six string C chord then lift your 2nd finger. accompanying guitar player singers learn to be their own bass play by emphasizing root movement of the chords. Martins are famous for this. think stephen stills or neil young or  john maher. someone buys a d45 for that, not dinky picking around.
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Looking for
Friends
Relationship
Married
Work
Occupation
Gubmnt worker, Singer/Guitarist, restore old motorcycles, photographer, blogger
Employment
  • Second story man
    Jewel Thief, present
Jack Hammer's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.
Easy Battery Saver+Task Killer
market.android.com

Easy Battery Saver, your super battery savior Does your phone always need charging, even once a day? Does your phone always die at crucial

Stimulator
market.android.com

Erotic stories from Authors around the world. Suitable for all ages and backgrounds. Read and enjoy!

I've been on the jewelry side of the business several times and they do great, easy going, polite old school customer service. I just had them take a links links out of a bracelet style watch band and put a battery in 2 watches and they insisted on doing them right the even though I had walked in 20 minutes before closing time. They have a lot of interesting looking jewelry in their cases too and it appears to be reasonably priced. This is exactly the kind of locally owned small business that big corporate stores have largely driven out of existence. Check them out.
• • •
Public - a month ago
reviewed a month ago
I'm a guitar player who uses acrylic nails. you use this the real hard acrylic finish that I was looking for. he does a great job.
Public - 3 months ago
reviewed 3 months ago
I fear both of these "reviews" are shills planted by people with a connection to Avada and not actual customers. The tell is neither talks about price or how the confusing health insurance coverage is handle. Hearing aids are very expensive. You can get a decent used car for what you spend on hearing aids. You always hear people talk about the great deal they got on their car, why aren't these reviewers talking about their great deal? I don't know of any way Google can protect users from self promoters or use of shills to make them look good. Always look at these reviews with a healthy skepticism.
• • •
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
The Dr. seemed like a great guy and they certainly have all the bells and whistle but when it comes to honest and ethical business practices Dr. Gilmer does not measure up. I found the Dr. first then advised my wife to go too. We would NOT have gone to him if he had not been on our dental insurance PREFERRED dentist list. Then earlier this year we noticed we were being asked to pay, at the time of the visit, an amount that sounded higher than what we though it should. Their explanations used insurance speak. It was always some vague story about how they don't know what the insurance company would pay. In May, my wife discovered that Dr Gilmer had ended his PREFERRED status with Met Life in January and his staff knew full well that was why the amounts were not what we expected. When we stood right in front of them and asked why the numbers didn't seem right, they knew why, and did NOT tell us. They knew the truth and made the conscious choice to lie right to our faces about it when the ONLY honest answer should have been, "we chose to end our Preferred status with Met Life", not a song and dance routine. Did they not think we'd eventually figure it out? We over paid all this year. $898 worth of work they billed the insurance company for, our share of it much higher because of the change in status. We would have gone on this way if my wife hadn't overheard something in the office. I went to their office and the person who always had spoken to us was not there and the Dr. was busy. Still, I told the receptionist that I thought they had hustled us, that they had engaged in an unethical business practice by not truthfully answering questions about what we were being ask to pay them right then. She did not protest what I was saying nor did they deny my accusation. I asked them to have the business manager, or Dr. Gilmer to call me. Of course, that call never happened. I was enamored by all the nice stuff in their office and I had thought the Dr. was a dentist I could count on long into the future. Now I’ll tell everyone I can, this story. And, oh by the way, the loose crown he re-cemented in April just came off again yesterday and broke the tooth it was attached to at the gum line.
• • •
Public - 3 years ago
reviewed 3 years ago
12 reviews
Map
Map
Map
john travolta landed here
Public - 6 months ago
reviewed 6 months ago
I didn't actually get treated by this guy. The office manager refused to let me be treated because I had exercised my legal right to refuse to sign their HIPPA release form. Let me quote from the HHS online document that address this issue. "The law does not require you to sign the “acknowledgement of receipt of the notice.” I'm required to sign something acknowledging that they offered me their HIPPA form, but no one is required to sign one. So, then the office manager repeatedly ask me why I wouldn't sign it, as it appeared that my stating what the law says wasn't enough for her. You are also not required to answer someones questions as to why you won't sign it. She then said that if I didn't sign it they wouldn't treat me, which is without a doubt one of the most serious infractions of HIPPA law they can commit, and, as I believe anyone who stands up for their rights should, I became upset and angrily told them that they could not refuse me for that reason. Let it suffice to say, it did not end well. I am in the process of documenting everything that was said and by whom and I am already in the process of filing a complaint to the civil rights divsion of the US Department of Human services. And on the humane side of things, I've wasted another week trying to get a tooth extracted that IS giving me pain, And I have to start over. Find a surgeon, get a referral, get an appointment to be examined, then another appointment to get the tooth out. This rude office manager exceeded her legal authority when she said they could refuse to treat me if I didn't sign their HIPPA release form. They are far from hearing the last of this. Posting what happened to me here is just one step in standing up for myself, as I encourage everyone who reads this to do. An office manager, or anyone else, to roll over you with claims of authority they do not possess. Know your rights and make others respect them. This office manager not only didn't respect my rights, when I called her on it, she took it personally, and responded in a rude and personal manner. Does this sound like the kind of place you'd want your dental surgery done? Another rule of mine is "don't reward bad behavior".
• • •
Public - 2 years ago
reviewed 2 years ago
They are a priceless resource. They eek by in a world dominated by giant companies. I wish they were more predicable as far as hours and phone answering goes but I always check them our first before buying anything from a dealer or iron pony. Someone else said "Last of a dying breed" and they are right. If they go, we are at the mercy of big business retailers. We should by used parts when we can, and from small business when we can or they will be gone. They aren't perfect, but neither are the dealers and Iron pony is sometimes ridiculously overpriced. Buy something from these guys! Even if it's something out of their find your own part bins.
• • •
Public - 4 years ago
reviewed 4 years ago