Profile

Scrapbook photo 1
Wilfred mogire
Works at Maria Salus Infirmorum kiongwani Music Academy
Attends Catholic University of Eastern Africa
Lives in Nairobi
12 followers|2,622 views
AboutPostsPhotosVideos+1's

Stream

Wilfred mogire

Shared publicly  - 
 
Be blessed baby Joe Mogire ! may you live long.
1
Add a comment...

Wilfred mogire

Shared publicly  - 
1
Wilfred mogire's profile photo
 
Pia Nairobi Tuko.
 ·  Translate
Add a comment...

Wilfred mogire

Shared publicly  - 
1
Add a comment...

Wilfred mogire

Shared publicly  - 
 
Wilfred mogire originally shared:
 
SINGING WELL IS PRAYING TWICE

By Wilfred Ok Mogire

For many Christians this is the season of Advent, four Sundays before Christmas. For churches that note Advent, we get caught in a bit of a cultural bind. I think Santa appeared at the Alton mall in mid November, and the twinkling lights of Christmas cheer are already decorating houses. When do we decorate the church? When do we start singing Christmas songs? Actually, some hold that we should not sing Christmas songs until Christmas Eve and then sing then until or past Epiphany, the feast of the Magi on Jan. 6th. Yet, the radio stations stop playing round the clock Christmas music stop right after Christmas to coincide with the stores tearing down Christmas decorations on the 26th often. I remember a lady at one of the churches I served saying that I must hate Christmas songs because I insisted that we sing songs of Advent into the second Sunday before Christmas.

Hymns touch us deeply. Their merger of lyric and tune burrow deep within our consciousness. I have been touched when visiting a nursing home or a hospital bed, and people will request or hum softly a favored hymn. They enter so deeply into our memories that they seem to emerge unbidden, or you find yourself singing along to the music of a hymn in a shopping center or at home buying presents from the internet.

I suggest that we not only listen to favorite or even unknown Christmas hymns, but that we look at the lyrics in our hymnbooks and read them as religious poetry. Yes, I realize lyrics are not poems as they are tied to the music, but nonetheless, they offer us a window in the Yuletide world.

For instance, I love O Little Child of Bethlehem. the great Phillips Brooks. He had visited the Holy Land and wrote the words for a Christmas program and induced his organist to write the tune for it. How are the hopes and fears of all the years met in the child (v.1)? Notice in v. 2 how he makes all nature sing for the birth, as if he is not satisfied, or nature is left unsatisfied, by the angel chorus. The last two verses are wonders. Amid all of the noise of Christmas celebration, he now emphasizes silence. Meek souls, like Tiny Tim receive Jesus. That manger image continues, as he asserts that we all act as manger for the baby Jesus. Our lives are the birthing room of the spirit in his view of the Incarnation. From silence, we now hear the good news, the glad tidings of Christmas. He ends with the phrase Emmanuel. In Hebrew it means God with us. How that comes to new life and meaning when we claim the Incarnation of God’s own vision, God’s logos, message (John 1:1, 14) into “world of sin.” I would argue that we have a whole theological world summoned by these four verses, an entry point into a much deeper awareness of the depth of Christmas than greeting card could hope to convey.

Augustine famously said that singing a hymn is praying twice. I suggest that praying them again with attention to the words is an excellent spiritual practice for Advent to prepare our hearts and minds for Christmas. It’s easy to do, but yo[u will note that a meditative air will come over you as you pause to work with the hymns and take a break from the frenzied rush of the holidays. after all, holiday comes from Old English for a holy day. Hymns provide a portal into the holy in the middle of everyday life.For many Christians this is the season of Advent, four Sundays before Christmas. For churches that note Advent, we get caught in a bit of a cultural bind. I think Santa appeared at the Alton mall in mid November, and the twinkling lights of Christmas cheer are already decorating houses. When do we decorate the church? When do we start singing Christmas songs? Actually, some hold that we should not sing Christmas songs until Christmas Eve and then sing then until or past Epiphany, the feast of the Magi on Jan. 6th. Yet, the radio stations stop playing round the clock Christmas music stop right after Christmas to coincide with the stores tearing down Christmas decorations on the 26th often. I remember a lady at one of the churches I served saying that I must hate Christmas songs because I insisted that we sing songs of Advent into the second Sunday before Christmas.

Hymns touch us deeply. Their merger of lyric and tune burrow deep within our consciousness. I have been touched when visiting a nursing home or a hospital bed, and people will request or hum softly a favored hymn. They enter so deeply into our memories that they seem to emerge unbidden, or you find yourself singing along to the music of a hymn in a shopping center or at home buying presents from the internet.

I suggest that we not only listen to favorite or even unknown Christmas hymns, but that we look at the lyrics in our hymnbooks and read them as religious poetry. Yes, I realize lyrics are not poems as they are tied to the music, but nonetheless, they offer us a window in the Yuletide world.

For instance, I love O Little Child of Bethlehem. the great Phillips Brooks. He had visited the Holy Land and wrote the words for a Christmas program and induced his organist to write the tune for it. How are the hopes and fears of all the years met in the child (v.1)? Notice in v. 2 how he makes all nature sing for the birth, as if he is not satisfied, or nature is left unsatisfied, by the angel chorus. The last two verses are wonders. Amid all of the noise of Christmas celebration, he now emphasizes silence. Meek souls, like Tiny Tim receive Jesus. That manger image continues, as he asserts that we all act as manger for the baby Jesus. Our lives are the birthing room of the spirit in his view of the Incarnation. From silence, we now hear the good news, the glad tidings of Christmas. He ends with the phrase Emmanuel. In Hebrew it means God with us. How that comes to new life and meaning when we claim the Incarnation of God’s own vision, God’s logos, message (John 1:1, 14) into “world of sin.” I would argue that we have a whole theological world summoned by these four verses, an entry point into a much deeper awareness of the depth of Christmas than greeting card could hope to convey.

Augustine famously said that singing a hymn is praying twice. I suggest that praying them again with attention to the words is an excellent spiritual practice for Advent to prepare our hearts and minds for Christmas. It’s easy to do, but yo[u will note that a meditative air will come over you as you pause to work with the hymns and take a break from the frenzied rush of the holidays. after all, holiday comes from Old English for a holy day. Hymns provide a portal into the holy in the middle of everyday life

Read more: http://www.thetelegraph.com/articles/christmas-62800-until-sing.html#ixzz1p4CdSlFr
1
Wilfred mogire's profile photo
 
The Importance of Singing at Mass
     The goal of any congregation at any parish is to praise and worship God with all of its heart, mind, and soul.  We do this through our participation at Mass.  We do not just attend Mass.  In fact, we are called to assist and contribute.  How do we contribute?  Of course you may be thinking about the priests, servers, lectors, musicians, and anyone else in front that appear to be actively participating.  However, I speak of the congregation’s active role in the Mass.  To actively participate and contribute means to listen to the Word of God, pray collectively with the community, share in the Eucharist, and of course sing.  Why do I mention this at all?  Because we are missing a part of our worship when we do not sing.  Obviously there are Masses without song, but when there is song, it is our obligation to contribute as much as possible.
 
     Liturgical music has a deep tradition in Catholicism and the Mass.  In the old Latin Rite prior to second Vatican Council, there were two types of Masses: a High Mass, which is equivalent to our Christmas Midnight Mass or Easter Masses, and a Low Mass, which is equivalent to our regular Sunday Masses.  At one time in many churches, however, there was a High Mass celebrated every Sunday.  When one entered a church, one could feel the power and solemnity.  Such reverence and respect were present in these Masses.  The reason for this is because elements from the High Mass trickled down to the Low Mass.  One of these elements was Liturgical song.  The High Mass was sung.  In order to add the power and solemnity to the Low Mass, Liturgical song was a necessity.  A modern day parallel can be drawn between the Sunday and weekday Liturgies now.  These Masses are set apart mainly because of the use of music.  This helps us realize how important singing is.
 
     According to The General Instruction of the Roman Missal, “The faithful who gather together to await the Lord’s coming are instructed by the Apostle Paul to sing psalms, hymns, and inspired songs (see Col 3:16).  Song is the sign of the heart’s joy (see Acts 2:46).  Thus St. Augustine says rightly: ‘To sing belongs to lovers.’1  There is also the ancient proverb: ‘One who sings well prays twice.’”
 
     As it is suggested above, song is a prayer form.  When one chooses not to sing, one is effectively saying, “I am not going to say this prayer.”  Some of the most important prayers are sung.  The “Gloria”, the “Sanctus” or “Holy, Holy”, the Memorial Acclamation and the Great Amen to name a few are of primary importance.  These songs reflect the reason why we go to Mass in the first place: the Eucharist.  Even when the Our Father is sung, do you find yourself not singing it?  If you are not, you are leaving out the prayer that Jesus taught us.  When one chooses not to sing, one does not pray with the rest of the community.
 
     Bishop Joseph A. Fiorenza says this about song in his 1987 pastoral letter: Sunday, the Original Feast Day, a Pastoral Letter on the Sunday Eucharist, “The importance of song in our celebration of Liturgy cannot be overstated; it sets the tone throughout our worship. It begins with our gathering song and unites us as a holy people.”  Song has the power to unite us in the mystery of Christ’s presence in the Eucharist (Fiorenza, Sunday).  If one person chooses not to sing, then we cannot all be united as a congregation.
 
     The closing hymn is also very important to the Liturgy.  We share our bond as a congregation throughout the final song even after Father has left the sanctuary.  When one leaves prior to the end of the song, it is saying that neither this prayer is important nor is the community praying it.  The crowd of people leaving during the final hymn is very distracting because of the inevitable banging of kneelers.  If you absolutely must leave, please respect those who are still praying by moving out as quietly as possible in order not to disturb others.
 
     The musicians who share their talent do not come to Mass to perform for the congregation.  These include cantors, choir members, and instrumentalists.  It is their duty to enhance song and lead the congregation when necessary.  The musicians put in a lot of time rehearsing and preparing for the Liturgy.  It is not their job to entertain or sing for someone else.  Each of us has the responsibility to do that for ourselves and treat Liturgical song with the utmost dignity and respect.  There will be times when the congregation will not know a hymn or the musician is difficult to follow.  In these instances, we are still obligated to attempt to follow even if it means to just follow the song quietly.  The moments when one does not attempt to sing are when one chooses not to pray with the congregation.  Song is not an optional part of the Mass.  It is as necessary as all the spoken prayers, rituals, and silences.
 
     God has given us each gifts.  These include our voice.  It is understood that some people may have better singing voices than others, but that should not stop us from singing.  We are called to assist and contribute at Mass.  When it comes to singing, God gave you your voice; He deserves to hear it.
Add a comment...
Have him in circles
12 people
ntoribi ken's profile photo
Job Mogire's profile photo

Wilfred mogire

Shared publicly  - 
 
God has blessed us with a baby boy. His name will be called Joe Mogire Mogire.The mother went through a c/s and my boy was born weighing 4kg. This forced the nurses to refer him to the nursery for some observation. He is still doing well there, very handsome and healthy. In fact he is so big, strong and looks like a portrait of a blinking idiot.
1
Add a comment...

Wilfred mogire

Shared publicly  - 
1
Add a comment...

Wilfred mogire

Shared publicly  - 
1
Wilfred mogire's profile photo
 
The best of the turkana songs I have ever Done!
Add a comment...

Wilfred mogire

Shared publicly  - 
1
1
Add a comment...

Wilfred mogire changed his profile photo.

Shared publicly  - 
 
My wife and I during the Meru Music conference
1
Add a comment...
People
Have him in circles
12 people
ntoribi ken's profile photo
Job Mogire's profile photo
Work
Occupation
Teacher
Employment
  • Maria Salus Infirmorum kiongwani Music Academy
    Director, present
Places
Map of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has livedMap of the places this user has lived
Currently
Nairobi
Links
Contributor to
Story
Tagline
A young Catholic Musician in Kenya (0727 405 086). Has trained and recorded many choirs including st. Dominic Savio Tassia, Good Shepherd Kakuma, Sengera parish, St. Teresa Ikutani among others
Introduction
I was born in Sengera village of Kisii county, in the year 1983. Am married to my beloved wife Joyce M Mogire. I stay in Nairobi, Langata Estate.
Education
  • Catholic University of Eastern Africa
    Theology and Political Science, present
Basic Information
Gender
Male
Other names
Wilfred Emmanuel Joyce Mogire
Wilfred mogire's +1's are the things they like, agree with, or want to recommend.