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Saeculum Aureum
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The Alexander Sarcophagus, c. 312 B.C.E., İstanbul Archaeological Museums - speakers: Dr. Elizabeth Macauley-Lewis and Dr. Steven Zucker

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Bringing together previous posts : here is a Constantine I coin,  with the Farnese Hercules on the reverse; c. 312 AD

From http://www.constantinethegreatcoins.com/HERCVLI/

#AncientRome   #Constantine   #Herculese  
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Rome is threatened with a great loss. The King of Naples is going to transport the Farnese Hercules to his palace. All the artists are in mourning. - Goethe, letter to a friend, 16th January 1787  ["The Italian Journey"]

Goethe also mentions that the Herculese was found without legs and that the artist - Michelangelo's protege - Guglielmo della Porta - made a substitute legs for him. Not long after - the original ones were found; however della Porta legs stayed on, on Michelangelo's recommendation, as a sort of proof that the "modern" day sculpture can rival the ancient one. Goethe disagreed. In the year that the Hercules was transported to Naples, the original legs were finally reunited with the rest of the body, and are now both exhibited in the Archaeological museum in Naples, which I had the good fortune to visit myself some weeks ago.

Also interesting is the fact that the sculpture is signed by a certain Glykon, who made this marble copy of the lost bronze work by either Lysippos, or one of his circle. Herculese holds the apples of the Hesperides behind his back, having just finished his 12 labors. 

See more here 
Lysippos, Farnese Hercules, 4th century B.C.E. (later Roman copy by Glycon)

#Hercules   #Naples   #AncientRome  
The "Farnese Hercules" was recovered from the Baths of Caracalla in Rome in 1546. The 3.15 meter (approx 10.5 feet) statue was part of the Farnese collection in Rome for many years, but was moved to Naples in 1787 and is now displayed in the Museo Archeologico Nazionale. This iconic image, which has been copied widely, shows an older Hercules leaning on the pelt of the Nemean lion and holding the apples of Hesperides in the hand behind his back. (Image source: Wikimedia Commons)
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The so-called Belgrade cameo, 4th century, National Museum in Belgrade

Possibly representing either emperor Constantine, or his father, Constantius I - also known as Constantius Chlorus, the Roman emperor  from 293 to 306. The emperor is shown riding a horse over a battlefield strewn with corpses of defeated enemies; on one side a Roman soldier is taking a prisoner. The emperor is bear headed, but wearing a diadem. 

#Constantine   #Cameo   #AncientRome   #Serbia  
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Using the opportunity of emperor Constantine's becoming an emperor anniversary, to start a long over due National museum in Belgrade album. Here is an appropriate for this occasion, and the star of antiquity collection of said museum, Portrait of Emperor Constantine from 4th century. 

Emperor Constantine was born in what is today Niš in Serbia, and was then the city of Naissus, which is also where this rare bronze head of the emperor was found. 

Read the 1911 Scientific American article on the find (Eng)
http://www.narodnimuzej.rs/images/Narodni_muzej_Beograd_Digital_270_1911.pdf

#Constantine      #Bronze     #Portrait     #Serbia     #Naissus     #AncientRome  
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Constantine the Great was proclaimed Roman emperor #onthisday in 306. Here's a gold medallion of him at prayer http://ow.ly/zzfOo
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Discovering Tutankhamun - Ashmolean museum
24 July 2014 – 2 November 2014

More about the exhibition : http://www.ashmolean.org/exhibitions/discovertut/about/

#Exhibition   #AncientEgypt   #Tutankhamun  

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“Can you see anything?” asked George Herbert, the fifth Earl of Carnarvon.
“Yes,” replied Howard Carter, “Wonderful things.”

Read Alastair Sooke's take on King Tut, as a new exhibition opens at the Ashmolean and see also First Look: ‘Discovering Tutankhamun’ at the Ashmolean Museum http://www.apollo-magazine.com/first-look-discovering-tutankhamun-ashmolean-museum/ in the Apollo magazine

#AncientEgypt   #Tutankhamun   #Exhibition   #Press   #AlastairSooke  

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Mary Beard visits the Antalya museum and adds it to great museums that aren't as well known as they should be list, especially excited about the sculpture from the cenotaph of young Gaius Caesar, Augustus' would-be heir. Some of the recently discovered panels belonging to his mausoleum - she considers not only high quality works, but on the same level with those such as Ara Pacis Augustae.

The Antalya Museum -- and the memorial to Gaius Caesar by Mary Beard http://timesonline.typepad.com/dons_life/2014/07/the-antalya-museum-and-the-memorial-to-gaius-caesar.html

#AncientRome   #Antalya   #Turkey   #GaiusCaesar   #AugustanArt   #Sculpture   #MaryBeard     #Museum  
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How many Greek legends were really true?
By Armand d'Angour, University of Oxford

The culture and legends of ancient Greece have a remarkably long legacy in the modern language of education, politics, philosophy, art and science. Classical references from thousands of years ago continue to appear. But what was the origin of some of these ideas?

Read the article here :
http://www.bbc.com/news/business-27923256

#AncientGreece   #Press  
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