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Gulf Coast Mensa
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Gulf Coast Mensa - Local chapter of American Mensa
Gulf Coast Mensa - Local chapter of American Mensa

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When the butterfly emerged from its pupa, Robert Reed was stunned. It was a Gulf fritillary — a bright-orange species with a few tigerlike stripes. But this butterfly had no trace of orange anywhere. It was entirely black and silver. "It was the most heavy-metal butterfly I've ever seen," Reed says. "It was amazing to see that thing crawl out of the pupa." http://ow.ly/SJSU30fA0rk
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How would you describe your morning commute? If you're like most people, it starts with a ballpark estimate of how long it usually takes. Or maybe several estimates, depending on when you leave for work, how bad traffic is, or whether you're walking, driving, or taking the bus. http://ow.ly/1iIg30fA00B
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An international team of researchers reports that when children are praised for being smart not only are they quicker to give up in the face of obstacles they are also more likely to be dishonest and cheat. Kids as young as age 3 appear to behave differently when told "You are so smart" vs. "You did very well this time." http://ow.ly/4RIz30fzZCJ
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Awe-inspiring views of the universe were celebrated at the Insight Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2017 awards ceremony, held at the Royal Greenwich Observatory. http://ow.ly/FFFT30fzZll
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In 1912 an inventor in New York City named Joseph W. Jones filed a patent for a "Combined Road-Map and Odometer" that is arguably the forerunner to today's dashboard GPS navigation systems. Jones' invention was for a complex apparatus that would display route directions and landmarks as a car travels between two specific points. The disc in the patent drawing above describes the route from Columbus Circle in Manhattan to Waterbury, Connecticut. http://ow.ly/4tU230fzZ7Z
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Poison frogs harbor some of the most potent neurotoxins we know, yet scientists have long wondered — how do these frogs keep from poisoning themselves? Scientists are now a step closer to resolving that head-scratcher. And the answer has potential consequences for the fight against pain and addiction. http://ow.ly/5J3330fzYdV
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One of our most FAQ is "Should I join Mensa?" Get some perspective from our own members. http://ow.ly/wnCd30fKjsH
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It was well past midnight when Michael Abrams, Claire Bedbrook and Ravi Nath crept into the Caltech lab where they were keeping their jellyfish. They didn't bother switching on the lights, opting instead to navigate the maze of desks and equipment by the pale blue glow of their cellphones. The students hadn't told anyone that they were doing this. It wasn't forbidden, exactly, but they wanted a chance to conduct their research without their PhD advisers breathing down their necks. http://ow.ly/lWYC30fzXRF
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A tiny self-organized mesh full of artificial synapses recalls its experiences and can solve simple problems. Its inventors hope it points the way to devices that match the brain's energy-efficient computing prowess. http://ow.ly/MBJD30fzXAs
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Tom Vaughan, a photographer then living in Colorado's Mancos Valley, kept a hummingbird feeder outside his house. One morning, he stepped through the portico door and noticed a black-chinned hummingbird dangling from the side of the red plastic feeder like a stray Christmas ornament. At first, Vaughan thought he knew what was going on. "I'd previously seen a hummingbird in a state of torpor," he said, "when it was hanging straight down by its feet, regenerating its batteries, before dropping down and flying off." http://ow.ly/VT9Q30fzXgG
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