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Malakonda Reddy
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Rendered, Re-Render and RenderAs Attributes in Visualforce
Force.com Visualforce Tools:
‘Rendered’, ‘Render As’, ‘ReRender’ 
Imagine you want to generate a PDF report or a word document from a Visualforce page. What if you could set the ‘renderAs’ attribute to generate the entire Visualforce page in a described format? Wow!
 Example: rendering the Visualforce content in PDF format.
<apex:page renderAs=”pdf”>
//
//Visualforce content here
//
</apex:page>
 
renderAs
This attribute is used to render the whole document as PDF, or any other standard document format.
Rendered
The return type for this attribute is a boolean which is used to hide or show any Visualforce component. It is always defaulted to true.
rerender 
This attribute is used to refresh a particular section or a Visualforce code block.
The user types in the first text box. The block inside the Apex output panel refreshes and displays the second text box. Again, if the user starts typing in the second text box, the third text box appears. (Refer to images below.)
The user starts typing in text box.
tut1
When the user starts typing, the second text box automatically appears.
tut2
Image-3-  When the user types on  the second tab, third tab appears.
tut3
The Apex action support tag is used to handle the event of typing the text in the text box. All I have done is match the rerender value of the action support event with the Id of the output panel; and used the rendered attribute to return a boolean value. I used the LEN formula function in the Visualforce page to check the length of the previous text field. (See detailed code below.)
1:  <apex:page controller="renderedex" >  
2:  <apex:form >  
3:   <apex:pageBlock title="User Input" id="thePageBlock">  
4:       <apex:outputText value="Text1"></apex:outputText>  
5:       <apex:inputtext value="{!text1}">  
6:       <apex:actionSupport reRender="refresh" event="onkeyup" />       
7:       </apex:inputtext><br/>   
8:        <apex:outputPanel id="refresh" >  
9:                            <apex:pageblocksection rendered="{!LEN(text1)>0}">  
10:                           <apex:inputText value="{!text2 }" id="theTextInput2" label="Input 2" rendered="true" tabindex="2">  
11:                            <apex:actionSupport reRender="refresh1" event="onkeyup" />   
12:                            </apex:inputtext>  
13:                      </apex:pageblocksection>  
14:        </apex:outputPanel>  
15:        <apex:outputPanel id="refresh1" >  
16:                            <apex:pageblocksection rendered="{!LEN(text2)>0}">  
17:                            <apex:inputText value="{!text3 }" id="theTextInput3" label="Input 3" rendered="true" tabindex="3">  
18:                            </apex:inputtext>  
19:                            </apex:pageblocksection>  
20:        </apex:outputPanel>  
21:       </apex:pageBlock>  
22:  </apex:form>  
23:  </apex:page>           

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Talend Integration
Bimeda-QAD
Integration Change Process: Table of Contents 1.     Salesforce Connection Change . 1 2.    Billingaccount_Job . 6 3.    Debtors_Job . 8 4.    Product
Job . 10 5.    Pricesheet
Job . 12 6.    Invoice
Line item Job . 13 7.    Oreder
Request Lineit...

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What are Apex Collections?
Collections are a group of aggregate data. They act like containers for storing a collection of records. Examples outside of the Apex/database world include a deck of cards, Mail folders (your InBox), a book of recipes, a collection of stamps, etc.. With the help of Collections, we can address aggregate data in our Saleforce database.
Uses of Collections:
In Salesforce databases we have thousands of records in one object. Sometimes, we need to apply certain business logic only to a selected group of records.  For example: we have to do validation only for records which have Opportunity Status value equal to “closed lost”. In order to select this group of records, we can store the records in a Apex Collection variable.
Currently Salesforce supports three types of Collections. And, unlike Java, we don’t have hashMap, hashSet or a Queue. Apex supports only these three collection types.
List
Set
Map
Benefits of the Apex Collections:
Collection data types are Flexible. Collections give programmers agility in easily collecting the data from an object based on filters and applying business logic on those gathered records.
They efficiently handle bulk data. This is really handy. Developers and programmers save time by not doing low level plumbing on their code.
Apex uses a hash structure for all sets. It means that like Java developers, we are not going to refer to the algorithm that is used to implement the steps.
Set is an un-ordered collection of data. So the return value from the sets doesn’t rely on the position in which the data is stored.
The codes can be bulkified (handling multiple records simultaneously). This can be done by the code referencing the Collection type.
Defining Collections
Defining a List:
List<account> accName=new List<account>();  // We can store a Collection of account records inside the variable accName
 Defining a Set:
Set<id> storeIDS=new <id>(); // We can store a Collection of record id’s inside the variable storeIDS
Defining a Map:
Map<Id, Contact> cs = new Map<Id, Contact>(); // Map always comes with key value pairs. Just like how an entire table can be called with a primary key. We can call the value  of a Map by calling its key. In this example we have <Id, Contact> where Id  is the key and Contact(Sobject) is the  value. By calling the Id of the Map we can call its relevant contact record.
Conclusion:
We can handle large volumes of data by the effective usage of Collection data types. Collections are a programmer’s friend.

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Integration
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